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Coast Pilot 7 - Chapter 9 - Edition 49, 2017



Chetco River to Columbia River, Oregon

(1) This chapter describes 200 miles of the Oregon coast from the mouth of the Chetco River to the mouth of the Columbia River. Also described are the Chetco and Rogue Rivers, Port Orford, Coquille River, Coos Bay, Umpqua and Siuslaw Rivers, Yaquina Bay and River, Nehalem River, and Tillamook Bay. The cities of Coos Bay and North Bend on Coos Bay and Newport on Yaquina Bay are the only deep-draft ports on the Oregon coast. The principal dangers are unmarked Rogue River Reef, and Orford Reef, which is marked by a light.

(2) 
 COLREGS Demarcation Lines
(3) The lines established for this part of the coast are described in 33 CFR 80.1305 through 80.1360 chapter 2.

(4) Weather, Chetco River to Columbia River
(5) Fog and rain are the major weather headaches to the mariner along the Oregon coast. Summer and early fall bring light winds, mild temperatures, clear or partly cloudy skies, and frequent fog. While fog is a problem all along the coast, its frequency increases as you head south. Around Astoria, visibilities drop below 0.5 mile (0.9 km) on 4 to 6 days per month from August through October. At North Bend, this happens on 6 to 13 days per month from July through December. August is usually the worst month. Fog is thickest at night and in the morning. Conditions often improve by midafternoon, when skies clear or become partly cloudy. Temperatures climb into the mid-sixties (16.7° to 19.4°C) in summer and low sixties (16.1° to 17.2°C) in fall. At night, they drop into the low fifties (10.6° to 11.7°C) in summer and mid-forties (6.1° to 8.3°C) in autumn. Winds are generally light in summer and early fall. Northwesterlies and southwesterlies through southerlies are frequent, the latter becoming increasingly so in fall. Winds at North Bend on Coos Bay are an exception, and strongest in June, July, and August. They blow at 17 knots or more 15 to 20 percent of the time and at 28 knots or more 1 to 2 percent of the time.

(6) Rain (0.1 inch or more) falls on less than 10 days per month from May through September. It becomes more frequent in October and reaches a peak in January, when 15 to 20 rainy days occur on the average. Snow is uncommon, since temperatures are usually mild. Winter temperatures reach the low fifties (10.6° to 11.7°C) during the day and fall into the upper thirties (3° to 4°C) at night; extremes have dipped into the low teens (-11.7° to -10.6°C). Fog can occur in winter with fronts or under rare clear skies; it is more likely in early winter. Winter and spring winds are moderately strong, particularly south of Newport. From North Bend southward, winds reach 17 knots or more about 5 to 15 percent of the time and 28 knots or more about 1 to 3 percent of the time. Extreme wind speeds usually occur in either winter or early spring, and have climbed to around 50 knots. They are most common from a south direction. Winter winds along the entire coast are generally out of the southeast through south. Northwesterlies are also common. It is not until May that these directions switch roles and northwesterlies become more or as frequent. Spring warming is also a slow process. By April, temperatures are about 4° to 7° above January levels.

(7) 
 Charts 18602, 18600

(8) From the California-Oregon boundary for 3.8 miles to Chetco River, the coast is composed of low rocky cliffs, bordered by numerous rocks and ledges, covered and awash, and backed by a low narrow tableland. Several prominent rocky knolls rise from 100 to 200 feet above this tableland. Due to the numerous dangers, the coast should not be approached closer than 1.5 miles. The sea boundary between the Eleventh and Thirteenth Coast Guard Districts is at the state boundary between California and Oregon.

(9) Chetco Cove 15.5 miles north of Point St. George, affords some protection from NW winds, but is exposed in south weather. Chetco Point marks the northwest side of the cove. There are numerous visible and covered rocks fringing the shore of the cove and its approaches. Chetco River empties into the north side of the cove. The river is entered through a dredged channel which leads between two stone jetties to the Port of Brookings turning basin, about 0.3 mile above the jetties. The turning basin and a small-craft basin just north of it are protected to the west by a 1,800-foot-long dike. Another small-craft basin is about 250 yards southeast of the turning basin. A barge slip, just east of the turning basin, is at the north side of the mouth of the entrance channel to the lower small-craft basin. The river entrance channel is marked by a 030° lighted range. A light is on the outer end of the west jetty and a mariner radio activated sound signal is on the inner end of the east jetty, initiated by keying the microphone five times on VHF-FM channel 83A.

(10) A Federal project provides for a 14-foot entrance channel and turning basin from deep water in Chetco Cove to the turning basin just inside the breakwater protecting the Port of Brookings; access channels with project depths of 12 feet, lead north and south from the turning basin. (See Notice to Mariners and latest editions of charts for controlling depths.) An overhead power cable crossing the river about 0.6 mile above the jetties has a clearance of about 46 feet. The highway bridge has a clearance of 59 feet.

(11) 
 COLREGS Demarcation Lines
(12) The lines established for the Chetco River are described in 33 CFR 80.1305 chapter 2.

(13) 
 Coast Guard
(14) Chetco River Coast Guard Station is on the east side of the river 450 yards inside the entrance. A lookout tower atop a building at the station is used to observe the bar during heavy weather. The Coast Guard has established Chetco River Regulated Navigation Area Warning Sign, a rough bar advisory sign 13 feet above the water, visible from the channel looking seaward, on the north end of the Coast Guard moorings, to promote safety for small-boat operators. The sign is diamond-shaped, painted white with an international orange border, and with the words “Rough Bar” in black letters. The sign is equipped with two quick flashing amber lights that will be activated when hazardous conditions exist and the bar is restricted to recreational and uninspected passenger vessels. Boaters are cautioned, however, that if the lights are not flashing, it is no guarantee that sea conditions are favorable.

(15) A heavy weather flag a square RED flag with a square BLACK center, will be displayed on a pole that is located near the north end of the Coast Guard station and is visible to mariners from both directions to indicate that winds 48 knots and above are forecast for the area. Display of flags are required from one hour before sunrise to one hour after sunset. Weather flags are flown at select Coast Guard stations to supplement other weather notification sources. Light signals corresponding to these flags are not displayed at night. In all cases mariners should rely upon National Weather Service broadcasts as their primary source of government provided weather information.

(16) The upper and lower small-craft basins are used primarily by commercial fishing boats and pleasure craft. The upper basin has over 500 berths, most with electricity; gasoline, diesel fuel, water, ice, marine supplies, and a launching ramp are available. Berths with electricity and water are reported to be available in the lower basin. A 60-ton lift and wet and dry winter storage are available.

(17) From Chetco Cove for 4.5 miles to Cape Ferrelo, the coast is composed of high broken cliffs, bordered by numerous rocky islets and ledges extending, in some cases, over 0.5 mile offshore.

(18) Goat Island locally known as Bird Island, is 1.9 miles northwest of Chetco Point and 500 yards offshore. It has deep water off its west and southwest faces, but rocks and foul ground extend 350 yards south from the southeast point. The island is readily identified; its profile closely resembles that of Prince Island off Pyramid Point.

(19) Cape Ferrelo 4.4 miles northwest of Chetco Point, is the prominent headland north of St. George Reef and, though not projecting seaward to any extent, is conspicuous because of its bold, rugged face. Several rocks and islets lie up to 0.5 mile directly off the cape.

(20) From Cape Ferrelo for 9.5 miles to Crook Point, the coast is very rugged and rocky, with several large and prominent islets and reefs extending well offshore. In some cases, these form anchorages for small vessels in north weather.

(21) Whalehead Island the outer of two rocky islets 2.3 miles north of Cape Ferrelo, is 107 feet high. The inner of the two islets is 128 feet high. A rock awash lies 800 yards south of the highest point of the island.

(22) A rugged cliff from 200 to 300 feet high is 3.3 miles north of Cape Ferrelo. The face is about 1 mile long, and behind it rises a treeless triple-headed hill to heights of 700 to 800 feet.

(23) Thomas Creek 3.7 miles north of Cape Ferrelo, is crossed by the highest bridge in Oregon; the bridge stands 345 feet above the creek.

(24) Leaning Rock 49 feet high, is 0.5 mile offshore and 3.5 miles north of Whalehead Island. It has a perpendicular face on its northwest side and slopes gradually southeast. Several other rocks are near it.

(25) Between Whalehead Island and Crook Point are two prominent grassy areas in the forest near the crest of the hills about 2 miles apart and situated at an elevation of nearly 2,000 feet; the south one is known as Rocky Prairie.

(26) Yellow Rock 84 feet high, is 4.5 miles north of Whalehead Island and 0.5 mile offshore. The rock is yellowish in color and can be recognized from 4 miles offshore.

(27) Bosley Butte 8.5 miles northeast of Cape Ferrelo, shows above the coast ridges from the west and northwest as flat-topped with two summits separated by a slight depression. The northeast summit is rounded and somewhat larger, but is slightly lower than the east summit.

(28) Mack Arch is a double-headed rocky islet 0.8 mile offshore, 1.5 miles south of Crook Point and 8 miles north-northeast of Cape Ferrelo. The west head is 231 feet high and the east a little lower; both are black to near the summits, which are generally white from bird droppings. The arch, about 100 feet high, is under the east summit and shows prominently from south. A rock awash lies 125 yards south of the east point.

(29) The bight to the east-southeast of Mack Arch has been used as a temporary anchorage during moderate northwest weather. The rocks and reefs break the swell. In approaching the bight, pass to the south of Mack Arch about midway between it and Yellow Rock. Anchor in 11 fathoms, sand bottom, with Mack Arch bearing 296° and Yellow Rock bearing 155°. No breakers have been observed, but caution should be exercised as the place has not been closely surveyed.

(30) Mack Reef extends from Mack Arch to Crook Point and comprises many rocks, visible or sunken, varying in height from awash to 133 feet. From south these rocks stand out conspicuously when seen against the white sand dunes north of Crook Point. Mack Arch, because of its size and height, is the most prominent.

(31) Mack Arch Cove lies immediately east of Mack Reef and affords fair shelter in northwest weather in 6 to 7 fathoms, sandy bottom. In entering from south, pass east of Mack Arch, giving it a berth of about 150 yards, but taking care to avoid the rock 125 yards south of its east point. Then bring the 125-foot rock, in the north part of the reef, to bear 352° and steer for it on that bearing until up to the area abreast the group of rocks 0.5 mile north of Mack Arch.

(32) Crook Point is moderately low, but terminates seaward in a rocky knoll 175 feet high, with a slight depression immediately behind it. The rocks close to the point often show up during moderately thick weather; several have a very noticeable pinnacle formation.

(33) From the vicinity of Crook Point to the mouth of the Pistol River are sand dunes which show up prominently in clear weather and distinctly mark this section. In thick weather these dunes are not readily distinguished. From the mouth of the river to Cape Sebastian are numerous rocks and rocky islets extending 0.3 mile offshore, reaching in some cases a height of 150 feet. The Pistol River bar opens in the rainy season; its location varies from year to year.

(34) Hunters Cove a small constricted cove under the southeast face of Cape Sebastian, is formed partly by the cape and partly by Hunters Island in the entrance. The island is 0.2 mile in extent, rocky, flat-topped, and 113 feet high. Shoal water extends from it east to the beach. The cove is used occasionally by launches and small craft. During strong northwest weather the sea at the entrance is rather lumpy for small boats. With moderate southwest weather a heavy sea piles up across the entrance between the cape and Hunters Island.

(35) 
 Charts 18601, 18589

(36) Cape Sebastian 33.5 miles north of Point St. George, is conspicuous from either north or south. It is the seaward termination of a ridge transverse to the coast, and rises abruptly from seaward to a height of 694 feet, with a depression behind it, and then more gradually to a height of about 2,000 feet. The seaward face is precipitous and broken, and has a few trees; southward the lower part is grass covered. A rock covered 1¾ fathoms that seldom breaks is 0.5 mile offshore, 0.9 mile northwest of the west extremity of the cape.

(37) From Cape Sebastian for 6 miles to the mouth of Rogue River, the coast is considerably broken, quite rugged, and low near the beach, and has a few outlying rocks.

(38) The outer of three exposed rocks off the entrance to Hunter Creek 3.7 miles north of Cape Sebastian, lies nearly 0.5 miles offshore.

(39) Rogue River 6 miles north of Cape Sebastian, is an important sport fishing stream. Several float landings and a hoist for trailer-drawn craft are just above the old lumber dock on the north side of the river near the mouth. Gold Beach on the opposite side of the river from Wedderburn is the larger town. The entrance to Rogue River is protected by stone jetties; buoys mark the approach. A seasonal light and sound signal are on the seaward end of the northwest jetty. A Federal project provides for a 13-foot entrance channel from the ocean along the north jetty to a point about 0.4 mile above the northwest jetty light. At this point, a dredged access channel continues east-northeast from the entrance channel then turns sharply south-southeast and leads between two jetties to a boat basin at Gold Beach. (See Notice to Mariners and latest editions of charts for controlling depths.)

(40) 
 Coast Guard
(41) The Coast Guard has a seasonal lifeboat station in the boat basin that operates from June to mid-September and can be reached on VHF-FM channel 12.

(42) The Coast Guard has established Rogue River Regulated Navigation Area Warning Sign, a seasonal rough bar advisory sign on the north side of the river, 0.6 mile upstream of the entrance, to promote safety for small-boat operators. The sign is diamond-shaped, painted with an international orange border, and with the words “Rough Bar” in black letters. The sign is equipped with two quick flashing amber lights that will be activated when hazardous conditions exist and the bar is restricted to recreational and uninspected passenger vessels. Boaters are cautioned, however, that if the lights are not flashing, it is no guarantee that sea conditions are favorable.

(43) A heavy weather flag a square RED flag with a square BLACK center, will be displayed on a pole that is located near the south side of the Coast Guard lifeboat station and is visible to mariners from both directions to indicate that winds 48 knots and above are forecast for the area. Display of flags are required from one hour before sunrise to one hour after sunset. Weather flags are flown at select Coast Guard stations to supplement other weather notification sources. Light signals corresponding to these flags are not displayed at night. In all cases mariners should rely upon National Weather Service broadcasts as their primary source of government provided weather information.

(44) 
 Caution
(45) The controlling depths in Rogue River channel and basin are usually considerably less than project depth and are subject to continual and pronounced change; vessels are advised not to enter the river without local knowledge.

(46) 
 COLREGS Demarcation Lines
(47) The lines established for the Rogue River are described in 33 CFR 80.1310 chapter 2.

(48) About 200 berths, some with electricity, gasoline, diesel fuel, water, ice, launching ramps, wet and dry winter storage, and marine supplies, are available in Gold Beach.

(49) A concrete arch highway bridge across Rogue River, 0.8 mile above the mouth, has a fixed span with a clearance of 30 feet. An overhead power cable with a clearance of 77 feet crosses the river about 0.2 mile east of the highway bridge. The bridge is prominent when off the mouth of the river.

(50) The north head at Rogue River entrance that reaches a height of 700 feet a mile north of the river, the marked depression in the coast range made by the river valley, and the rocks of Rogue River Reef are prominent from seaward.

(51) Rogue River Reef extending over 4 miles northwest from Rogue River entrance, includes many visible and covered rocks; because of the broken bottom, vessels should stay over 5 miles offshore when passing this area. A 0.5-mile-wide channel separates the reef from the beach, but it is not safe to use without local knowledge. Northwest Rock 4 miles northwest of Rogue River entrance, is the outermost visible rock of the reef. A rock, covered 2½ fathoms, is 0.3 mile west of Northwest Rock. Needle Rock 1.1 miles southeast of Northwest Rock, is the most prominent of the rocks in the reef; the needle is on the south side.

(52) North of Rogue River the coast trends north for 10 miles and then northwest to Cape Blanco. The mountains are high, irregular, dark, and covered with chaparral. The beach is bordered by numerous rocks for 5 miles, then is comparatively clear with the exception of Orford and Blanco Reefs.

(53) A group of covered and visible rocks, 1 mile long and 0.5 mile wide, lies 5 miles north of Rogue River and nearly 2 miles offshore; these rise abruptly from 12 fathoms. North Rock 7 feet high, is the largest and nearest to the beach. A rock, covered 1¼ fathoms, lies about 0.6 mile northwest of North Rock.

(54) The channel between Rogue River Reef and the mainland, and North Rock and the mainland, is sometimes used by coastwise freighters in clear weather. This channel should not be attempted by strangers.

(55) Brushy Bald Mountain nearly 9 miles northeast of Rogue River entrance and 3 miles inland, shows up in hazy weather as a flat rounded peak, with a gentle slope from a west and south direction.

(56) Sisters Rocks are a group of three rocky islets 10.5 miles north of Rogue River entrance. The smallest, 0.8 mile offshore, is the outermost. There is fairly smooth water in northwest weather under the lee of the largest islet.

(57) Colebrooke Butte 2 miles east of Sisters Rocks, appears from the west as a cone with gentle sloping sides. The upper part usually shows against the skyline and is readily recognized. From the south, it shows as a rounded peak which resembles Brushy Bald Mountain, though it is somewhat lower. The north part of the summit is tree covered and dark green, and the south part is grass and brush covered and light green. The slopes are timbered except for the lower part of the seaward slope, which is bare and brown.

(58) Lookout Rock 2.3 miles north of Sisters Rocks, is a prominent projecting cliff, with a marked depression behind it. The seaward face is precipitous.

(59) Bald Mountain 3.2 miles northeast of Lookout Rock, appears from offshore as an irregular knob at the northwest end of a long ridge. Rocky Peak on the southeast end of the ridge, is a sharp conical peak. From a southwest direction, three peaks or knobs show; from a north-northwest direction, two peaks show almost in range. These peaks were used by the early navigators as a landfall for Port Orford in coming from the north.

(60) Prominent Humbug Mountain 3.3 miles north of Lookout Rock and 4 miles south of Port Orford, is conical in shape, and its seaward face is steep and rugged.

(61) 
 Chart 18589

(62) Island Rock 1.3 miles off the seaward face of Humbug Mountain, is flat on top. A needle rock is 200 yards off its northwest end. These rocks are prominent when approaching Port Orford from south. Except for two small rocky patches, covered 6¾ and 10 fathoms, within 0.5 mile of the north end of Island Rock, there is deep water around these islands and between them and the beach.

(63) Redfish Rocks are a group of islets covering an area 0.5 mile square, lying 2 miles north of Island Rock and nearly 1 mile offshore. They are six in number and range from 10 to 140 feet in height. Many covered rocks lie within this area.

(64) Port Orford 6.5 miles south of Cape Blanco and 19 miles north of Rogue River, is a cove that affords good shelter in northwest weather, but is exposed and dangerous in south weather. It is easy of access and is probably the best natural northwest lee north of Point Reyes.


(66) The town of Port Orford on the north side of the cove, is the home of the famous yellow cedar; lumber is trucked from the town.

(67) The Heads forming the west point of the cove, appear from south as a long ridge with three knobs. The inner two are slightly higher and covered with trees. Tichenor Rock lies 175 yards south of The Heads.

(68) Klooqueh Rock 0.3 mile off the northwest face of The Heads, is black and conical in shape. It is prominent, especially when coming from the northwest inside Orford Reef. Rocky ledges are between this rock and shore.

(69) Anchorage may be had in about the center of Port Orford in 5 to 10 fathoms, sand bottom, however, it is reported that many anchors have been lost near the rocky 1¾-fathom shoal 0.2 mile east of the south end of the breakwater. The cove is marked by a lighted bell buoy and a light, 0.5 mile south and 0.8 mile east-northeast of Tichenor Rock, respectively. Small craft may anchor closer to The Heads where better protection is afforded against the northwest winds, which sweep with considerable force through the depression at the head of the cove.

(70) Battle Rock in the north part of the cove close to shore, is high, narrow, and black; it is detached only at extreme high tides. Visible and covered rocks extend up to 0.5 mile from shore around the cove.

(71) A wharf east of Graveyard Point is used mostly for commercial fishing. Fishing boats are lifted to cradles on the wharf with two large hoists. The wharf can accommodate vessels that are a maximum of: 44 feet in length, 15 feet in width and no more than 19 tons. Gasoline, diesel fuel, water, marine supplies, ice and dry boat storage is available on the wharf; minor repairs can be made. At times, shoaling causes the water depth alongside the wharf to be less than adequate for docking. Mariners are urged to contact the wharf office at 541–332–1306 for the latest conditions. A 550-foot breakwater extends southeast from Graveyard Point and provides some protection for the wharf.

(72) From The Heads for 6.5 miles to Cape Blanco, the coast extends in a general north-northwest direction. North of The Heads the shore is a narrow sand ridge, rising at one point to 160 feet, covered with grass, fern, and brush, and ending abruptly nearly 3 miles from The Heads at the edge of the Elk River Valley. North of this point are sand dunes extending to the mouth of Elk River a small unimportant stream. Beyond the mouth of Elk River to Cape Blanco, the coast consists of vertical cliffs, wooded to the edge, and in some places over 150 feet high.

(73) Orford Reef from 2 to 5 miles offshore between The Heads and Cape Blanco, is composed of a group of irregular rocks up to 149 feet high and ledges, many of which are awash or show a break. Kelp extends from Orford Reef to within 1.3 miles of the shore.

(74) Fox Rock and Southeast Black Rock 1.3 miles apart, about 5 miles southwest of Cape Blanco, are the southernmost rocks of Orford Reef; they usually show a heavy break. Northwest Rock 3 miles southwest of Cape Blanco, is the northernmost visible rock of Orford Reef, although several rocks, covered 5 fathoms, are 1.2 miles northeast of Northwest Rock.

(75) Blanco Reef extending 1.5 miles southwest from Cape Blanco, consists of numerous rocks and ledges, some of which are marked by kelp. Black Rock 1.2 miles southwest of Cape Blanco Light, is the southernmost visible rock of Blanco Reef. Pyramid Rock 1 mile west of the light, is the northernmost visible rock of the reef, although a rocky patch uncovers about 3 feet 0.4 mile to the north. Rocky patches, covered ½ to 6 fathoms, extend from 0.5 mile southwest of Black Rock to 0.4 mile west of Pyramid Rock.

(76) In clear weather small vessels with local knowledge sometimes use the passage inside Orford Reef and between Orford Reef and Blanco Reef.

(77) Cape Blanco projects about 1.5 miles from the general trend of the coast. It is a small bare tableland, terminating seaward in a cliff 203 feet high, with low land behind it. A large high rock lies close under the south side of the cape. From seaward the cape is not prominent, but, from north or south, it appears like a moderately low bluff islet. The group of buildings at Cape Blanco is very prominent.

(78) Cape Blanco Light (42°50'13"N., 124°33'49"W.), 245 feet above the water, is shown from a 59-foot white conical tower near the center of the flat part of the cape.

(79) Numerous covered and visible rocks extend 0.5 mile or more northwest from the cape.

(80) Gull Rock 1 mile north of Cape Blanco Light, is surrounded by covered rocks. Its seaward face is black and rugged, and the summit has two knobs, the higher being to the S. A rocky patch, covered 3 fathoms, lies 0.5 mile west of Gull Rock.

(81) Castle Rock 1.5 miles northeast of Cape Blanco Light and 300 yards off the mouth of Sixes River rises abruptly from the sea and is readily made out 10 miles to seaward. Many low rocks and ledges are within 400 yards, and several rocky islets are to the west and northwest.

(82) Blacklock Point is a precipitous rocky point 2.5 miles north-northeast of Cape Blanco. The cliff is 157 feet high. A sharp high point, bordered by rocks, stretches out nearly 300 yards. A narrow curved line of rocks extends 0.8 mile west-southwest from the point. A rock that breaks in heavy weather is 1 mile northwest of the point. Rocky patches, covered 4 fathoms, are within 1.3 miles of the point in a west and northwest direction.

(83) 
 Chart 18580

(84) From Cape Blanco for 112 miles to Yaquina Head, the coast is remarkably straight and trends in a north-northeast direction. It differs considerably from the coast to the south. The coastal mountains are much lower, the difference being more marked because of the high mountains inland. The shore consists of high yellow sand dunes and cliffs broken by bold rocky headlands of moderate height and backed by low pine-covered hills. There are few outlying dangers, the outermost being Blacklock Point, Coquille Rock, and Cape Arago.

(85) From Blacklock Point the shore continues rocky with cliffs gradually decreasing in height for 1.5 miles north, thence for about 11 miles the shore is a broad sandy beach backed by dunes and long narrow lakes. The tree line is at an average distance of 0.2 mile from the sea. From the end of the sand beach for 2 miles to the mouth of Coquille River, the shore again consists of rocky cliffs, 40 to 80 feet high, with several outlying rocks as much as 0.5 mile from shore. Covered dangers extend 1.6 miles west from Coquille Point. The land directly behind this stretch of coast is comparatively flat and wooded, rising to heights of 1,000 feet in 2.5 to 3 miles.

(86) 
 Charts 18588, 18580

(87) Coquille River is 18 miles north of Cape Blanco. Some fishing boats operate from Bandon about 0.8 mile above the mouth.

(88) Coquille Point is 0.6 mile south of Coquille River entrance. Several rocky islets extend 0.5 mile off the point and rocks showing breakers in any swell extend 1.2 miles west and a mile northwest of the point.

(89) Coquille Rock 1.6 miles northwest of the point, is covered 28 feet and breaks in heavy weather.

(90) A long, low area of shifting dunes is north of the Coquille River entrance. The conical tower and dwelling of an abandoned lighthouse is near the inner end of the north jetty.

(91) 
 COLREGS Demarcation Lines
(92) The lines established for the Coquille River are described in 33 CFR 80.1315 chapter 2.

(93) The entrance to Coquille River is protected by jetties; a light and sound signal are on the south jetty. A Federal project provides for a depth of 13 feet from the entrance to Bandon. (See Notice to Mariners and latest editions of charts for controlling depths.) The channel is subject to frequent change, and the deepest water is not always on the entrance range. Local knowledge is essential when the bar is rough. It is reported that the bar breaks even in calm seas and mariners should favor the north in approaching the entrance range. The reported depth above Bandon is about 6 feet to Coquille, 21 miles above the entrance.

(94) 
 Coast Guard
(95) A Coast Guard motor lifeboat is stationed at the mooring basin at Bandon on the south side of the river about 0.8 mile above the entrance.

(96) The Coast Guard has established Coquille River Regulated Navigation Area Warning Sign, a seasonal rough bar advisory sign 29 feet above the water, visible from the channel looking seaward on the south shore just north of the Coast Guard station, to promote safety for small-boat operators. The sign is diamond-shaped, painted with an international orange border, and with the words “Rough Bar” in black letters. The sign is equipped with two quick flashing amber lights that will be activated when hazardous conditions exist and the bar is restricted to recreational and uninspected passenger vessels. Boaters are cautioned, however, that if the lights are not flashing, it is no guarantee that sea conditions are favorable.

(97) A small-craft basin, on the south side of the river about 0.9 mile above the entrance, has about 180 berths and a launching ramp; marine supplies and fuel (via truck) are available. The 310-foot wharf of a former lumbermill, northeast of the small-craft basin, has reported depths of 12 feet alongside. A machine shop is at Bandon.

(98) A highway bridge, 3 miles above the entrance, has a lift span with clearances of 28 feet down and 74 feet up; the span remains in the closed position. (See 33 CFR 117.1 through 117.59 and 117.875 chapter 2, for drawbridge regulations.) An overhead cable east of the bridge has a clearance of 72 feet.

(99) The village of Prosper is 4 miles above Coquille River entrance.

(100) Several power cables cross the river between Prosper and Coquille; the least clearance is 68 feet.

(101) Coquille 21 miles above the entrance, is the distributing center for several agricultural communities of the river valley and has railway connections with the interior.

(102) 
 Chart 18580

(103) North of the entrance to the Coquille River the sand dunes extend for about 4 miles and are then succeeded by cliffs. Fivemile Point 6 miles north of the river entrance, is a rocky cliff 60 feet high with a cluster of rocks, 10 to 40 feet high, extending more than 0.3 mile offshore.

(104) North of Fivemile Point the coast consists of cliffs, 40 to 80 feet high, which rise to heights of 100 to 250 feet 2 miles south of Cape Arago and are cut by deep gulches, named the Seven Devils. Numerous rocks of varying shapes and sizes border the beach.

(105) South Cove immediately under the south point of Cape Arago, is used extensively as a summer anchorage by small craft and fishing boats with local knowledge.

(106) Cape Arago 29 miles north-northeast of Cape Blanco, is an irregular jagged point projecting about a mile from the general trend of the coast. There are no high mountains immediately behind the cape, and it is conspicuous only when the mountains in the interior are obscured. The seaward face of the cape, 2.5 miles long in a north direction, is a narrow wooded tableland 50 feet high, with rugged and broken cliffs and outlying rocks of the same height as the cliff. Immediately off the cape are reefs extending northwest for about a mile. A small cove near the north end, inside the reefs, is sometimes used by small boats with local knowledge.

(107) 
 Charts 18587, 18580

(108) Baltimore Rock 3.2 miles north-northeast of Cape Arago, is covered 9 feet and usually breaks. It is the outermost rock of a covered ledge extending northwest from the shore. A lighted buoy is 0.2 mile north of the rock. East of Baltimore Rock, Mussel Reef extends about 0.8 mile northwest from Yoakam Point and has a least depth of 18 feet; mariners should exercise caution in this area.

(109) Coos Head 229 feet high, is on the south side of the entrance to Coos Bay. The cliffs of Coos Head are about 100 feet high and terminate in several small rocky points with sand beaches between them. The buildings of a former government facility are conspicuous on the bluffs just SW of Coos Head.

(110) Coos Bay 33 miles north of Cape Blanco, is used as a harbor of refuge and can be entered at any time except in extreme weather. Coos Bay is one of the most important harbors between San Francisco and the Columbia River, and one of the largest forest products ports in the world. Principal foreign exports are logs, woodchips, lumber, and plywood. The coastwise trade consists mainly of logs.

(111) From the entrance the bay extends northeast for 8 miles with widths of 0.3 to 1 mile, then bends southeast for about 4 miles to the mouth of Isthmus Slough. The dredged channel through the bay is bordered by marshland and intersected by several sloughs.

(112) 
 Prominent features
(113) Coos Head and Umpqua River Light are good guides to the entrance. The sand dunes north toward Umpqua River are prominent. The entrance to the bay is protected by jetties. A light with a seasonal sound signal marks the north jetty. A lighted whistle buoy is 1.8 miles west-northwest of the entrance. The channels are marked with lighted ranges, lights, buoys and daybeacons. Although no longer lighted, Cape Arago Lighthouse is a prominent 44-foot white octagonal tower attached to a building on a rocky, partially wooded island close inshore, 2.5 miles north of the cape.

(114) 
 Routes
(115) Vessels should make sure of the entrance range before standing close in. There is usually a current sweeping either north or south just off the jetties, and this current should be guarded against. The entrance ranges should be watched carefully until clear of all dangers. The south current is often encountered during the summer. With strong south winds during the winter, the current sometimes sets to the north.

(116) Approaching from any direction in thick weather, great caution is essential. The currents are variable and uncertain. Velocities of 3 to 3.5 knots have been observed offshore between Blunts Reef and Swiftsure Bank, and greater velocities have been reported. The most favorable time for crossing the bar is on the last of the flood current, and occasionally it is passable only at this time.

(117) 
 COLREGS Demarcation Lines
(118) The lines established for Coos Bay are described in33 CFR 80.1320 chapter 2.

(119) 
 Channels
(120) A Federal Project provides for a 37-foot channel across the bar to a point 1.1 miles above the mouth of Isthmus Slough, and thence, 22 feet to Millington, 14.7 miles above the entrance to the bay. Turning basins at North Bend and Coos Bay have project depths of 37 feet. (See Notice to Mariners and latest editions of charts for controlling depths.)

(121) 
 Coast Guard
(122) The Coast Guard has established Coos Bay South Slough Regulated Navigation Warning Sign, a rough bar advisory sign on the east end of the breakwater at Charleston Boat Basin in about 43°20'48"N., 124°19'18"W., to promote safety for small-boat operators. The sign is diamond-shaped, painted white with an international orange border, and with the words “Rough Bar” in black letters. The sign is equipped with two quick flashing amber lights that will be activated when hazardous conditions exist and the bar is restricted to recreational and uninspected passenger vessels. Boaters are cautioned, however, that if the lights are not flashing, it is no guarantee that the sea conditions are favorable.

(123) 
 Anchorage
(124) Anchorage for small craft can be had almost anywhere in the bay outside the dredged channels and below the railroad bridge.

(125) 
 Caution
(126) Due to the rapid and severe onset of weather from the North Pacific Ocean, anchorage in the ocean outside of Coos Bay is reported not safe and is dangerous during the winter months. Like all unprotected areas along the Oregon coast, large swells and heavy winds characterize the area during the winter. These conditions can suddenly and unexpectedly besiege the unwary with catastrophic results. The prevailing direction of both swell and wind will drive disabled or improperly handled vessels onto the shore.


(127) 
 Dangers
(128) Guano Rock on the south side of the entrance channel and 280 yards northwest of Coos Head, uncovers only at extreme low water.

(129) A submerged section of the north entrance jetty extends about 300 yards west of the visible jetty; and a submerged section of the south entrance jetty extends about 100 yards west of the visible jetty. Because of the submerged jetties, it is reported that there are breakers in these areas most of the time. Extreme care must be exercised at all times.

(130) A submerged jetty extends 500 yards off the east shore of Coos Bay just inside the entrance, 0.8 mile northeast of Coos Head. In entering with a strong northwest wind, large vessels have difficulty in making the turn and may find themselves being set toward the submerged jetty.

(131) 
 Bridges
(132) The Coos Bay Railroad bridge across Coos Bay, 7.5 miles above the entrance, has a swing span with a vertical clearance of 12 feet. Mariners should use extreme caution when passing through the bridge because of unpredictable changing winds, currents, and sea conditions reported in this area. The bridgetender monitors VHF-FM channel 18A and works on channel 13; call sign KT-2006. A fixed highway bridge 8.1 miles above the entrance, has a clearance of 123 feet across the main channel. A power cable, 100 yards west of the fixed bridge, has a clearance of 167 feet. (See 33 CFR 117.1 through 117.59 and 117.871 chapter 2, for drawbridge regulations.)

(133) 
 Currents
(134) Current observations in the entrance to Coos Bay indicated a velocity of about 2 knots. The greatest observed ebb velocity was a little over 3 knots. Predictions for the entrance may be obtained from the Tidal Current Tables. During long runouts an ebb current of 5 knots has been reported at Guano Rock.

(135) Pilotage, Coos Bay
(136) Pilotage is compulsory for all foreign vessels and all U.S. vessels under registry. Pilotage is optional for U.S. vessels in the coastwise trade that have onboard a pilot licensed by the Federal Government for these waters.

(137) Pilotage for Coos Bay, its tributaries and Yaquina Bay is available from Coos Bay Pilots Association 686 N Front Street, Coos Bay, OR 97420; telephone 541–267–6555; Fax 541–267–5256.

(138) The pilot boats monitor VHF-FM channels 13 and 16 and use channels 12 and 18A as working frequency.

(139) The pilot boats, COOS BAY and NORTH BEND, are 75-foot-long tugs with black hulls, orange pilothouses, and white stacks. The pilot boats used the standard pilot lights at night. Vessels are handled 24 hours a day, weather permitting.

(140) Arrangements for pilots are usually made by ships’ agents or by telephone. A 24-hour notice of time of arrival is requested. The pilots usually board vessels about 1 mile northwest of Coos Bay Approach Lighted Whistle Buoy K. Vessels are requested to maintain a speed of about 4 to 5 knots and rig the ladder, without manropes, about 3 meters above the water.

(141) 
 Towage
(142) Tugs to 2,000 hp are available and are used for docking and mooring. The two pilot boats, the largest tugs available, do most of the dock assist work in the port.

(143) 
 Quarantine, customs, immigration and agricultural quarantine
(144) Coos Bay is a customs port of entry. (See Vessel Arrival Inspections, chapter 3.)

(145) Quarantine is enforced in accordance with regulations of the U.S. Public Health Service. (See Public Health Service, chapter 1, for details.)

(146) 
 Coast Guard
(147) Coos Bay Coast Guard Station is on the south side of Charleston Boat Basin, 0.7 mile southeast of Coos Head. North Bend Coast Guard Air Station is at Southwest Oregon Regional Airport.

(148) 
 Harbor regulations
(149) The port authority, Oregon International Port of Coos Bay, is controlled by a Board of Port Commissioners and a port manager. Harbor regulations are prescribed by the Port Commissioners and enforced by the port manager. The port manager’s office is at 125 Central Avenue, Suite 300, Coos Bay.

(150) 
 Wharves
(151) Most of the deep-draft facilities in the Port of Coos Bay are at the cities of Coos Bay and North Bend; only these facilities are listed in the table. The alongside depths are reported depths; for information on the latest depths contact the port manager or the private operators. All the facilities described have direct highway connections and most have connections to a Class I railroad. Water is available at most of the wharves, but electrical shore power connections are only available at reference numbers 1 and 6 in the table. Special handling equipment, if available, is mentioned under Mechanical Handling Facilities in the table.


(153) 
 Supplies
(154) Most marine supplies and services are available at Coos Bay. Fuel oil is available at one fuel pier. Diesel oil and water are available.

(155) 
 Repairs
(156) There are no facilities for major repairs to large oceangoing vessels in Coos Bay; the nearest such facilities are in Portland, OR. Above-the-waterline repairs can be made at several machine shops on the waterfront. There are two 1,000-ton drydocks at Coos Bay which can handle vessels up to 180 feet in length and 45 feet in width. The largest marine railway can handle vessels to 1,200 tons, 137 feet long, 45 feet wide, and 12 feet in draft. Hull and engine repairs can be made here. Electronic repairs can be arranged for. (See Charleston Boat Basin, this chapter, for small-craft facilities and repairs.)

(157) 
 Communications
(158) The cities of Coos Bay and North Bend are served by U.S. Highway 101 and a Class I railroad. Two state highways connect to Interstate Highway 5 inland. Southwest Oregon Regional Airport is just northwest of North Bend.

(159) South Slough shoal and navigable only for small boats, extends 4 miles south from its junction with Coos Bay near the entrance. A Federal project provides for a 17-foot entrance channel extending south from the junction for about 0.6 mile to the Charleston Boat Basin, thence a 16-foot channel continues to a highway bascule bridge. (See Notice to Mariners and latest editions of chart for controlling depth information.)

(159.01) The channel from junction with Coos Bay to Charleston Boat Basin is subject to shoaling. A regulated navigation area warning sign is on the west side of the channel, approaching Charleston Boat Basin. The sign is diamond-shaped, white with orange border worded ROUGH BAR and has lights that flash when the bar is restricted to recreational and uninspected passenger vessels. Contact the nearest U.S. Coast Guard unit for further information. Additionally, mariners are advised to seek local knowledge when transiting this area.

(160) Charleston Boat Basin operated and maintained by the Port of Coos Bay, is 0.3 mile north of Charleston, across the slough from Barview. The basin is used by commercial and sport fishermen. About 500 berths with electricity, gasoline, diesel fuel, water, ice, a launching ramp, and marine supplies are available. A pumpout station and wet and dry winter boat storage are available in the basin. A repair facility at the basin has a drydock that can handle vessels to 300 tons, 90 feet long, and 30 feet wide, and a marine railway that can handle craft 70 feet long, 22 feet wide, and 6 feet draft for hull and engine repairs. Electronic repairs can also be made at the basin. Four fish piers are in the basin, and three fish packing facilities are just south of the basin on South Slough. Coos Bay Coast Guard Station is on the south side of the basin.

(161) A Coast Guard buoy storage area is in Coos Bay about 150 yards E of the channel and about 2.5 miles above the entrance jetties.

(162) The highway bridge over South Slough, 1 mile south of the entrance, has a bascule span with a clearance of 22 feet. (See 33 CFR 117.1 through 117.59 and 117.892 chapter 2, for drawbridge regulations.) Power and television cables south of the bridge have a least clearance of 71 feet.

(163) The west shore of Coos Bay as far as the bend is formed by a sandspit covered with dunes, partly wooded, and in some places as much as 90 feet high. On the east shore and above the bend are low rolling hills with houses and several prominent buildings.

(164) Haynes Inlet and North Slough which join the bay through a common entrance on the north side, are navigated by small boats. Haynes Inlet and North Slough channels are marked by private daybeacons. A causeway with a fixed bridge over North Slough has a clearance of 15 feet. The causeway extends east and joins the State highway fixed bridge over Haynes Inlet, which has a clearance of 20 feet (27 feet at center).

(165) North Bend 9.5 miles above the entrance, is a city with many sawmills and factories; considerable lumber is shipped from here. North Bend Fire Department has a fire boat and launches dock along the city. Coos Bay 12 miles above the entrance, is the principal city on the bay and is the distributing center for the area, which is primarily devoted to lumbering, fishing, and agriculture. Coos Bay also includes the Empire district, which is 4 miles above the entrance. North Bend and Coos Bay form practically one continuous city extending along the shore from North Point to the mouth of Coalbank Slough.

(166) Three sloughs empty into Coos Bay between the city of Coos Bay and Coos River. Coalbank Slough is unused. Isthmus Slough is used for logging operations to Millington. The highway bridge across the slough has a bascule span with a clearance of 18 feet. (See 33 CFR 117.1 through 117.59 and 117.879 chapter 2, for drawbridge regulations.) The overhead power and television cables just north of the bridge, and the overhead power cable 0.9 mile south of the bridge, have clearances of 100 and 150 feet, respectively. Catching Slough is navigable for several miles by light-draft vessels. The fixed highway bridge across the mouth has a clearance of 40 feet. The power cable for about 1.7 miles above the bridge have a least clearance of 57 feet; other overhead cables upstream have a least known clearance of 13 feet.

(167) Coos River empties through two channels into the bay at its head. The north unmarked channel follows the east side of the bay and empties abreast of North Bend. Marshfield Channel marked by a lighted range, lights, and buoy, crosses the flats and empties abreast the city of Coos Bay.

(168) Coos River divides at a point 3.2 miles above Graveyard Point into South Fork and Millicoma River. A highway bridge across the river, 0.9 mile above Graveyard Point, has a lift span with clearances of 28 feet down and 54 feet up. (See 33 CFR 117.1 through 117.59 and 117.873 chapter 2, for drawbridge regulations.) The least clearance of the overhead power cables crossing Millicoma River is 40 feet. Allegany 7.5 miles above the confluence, is the head of navigation on Millicoma River. Dellwood 8.2 miles above the confluence, is the head of navigation on South Fork.

(169) A fixed highway bridge crossing South Fork 0.5 mile above the confluence has been removed; two concrete piers remain. A fixed highway bridge crossing South Fork 1.9 miles above the confluence has a clearance of 38 feet. Several overhead power and telegraph cables cross South Fork; least clearance is 42 feet.

(170) 
 Chart 18580

(171) From Coos Bay for 19.5 miles to Umpqua River, the coast consists of sand beaches and dunes backed by moderately low hills. The mouth of Tenmile Creek is 13.7 miles north of Coos Head.

(172) 
 Charts 18584, 18580

(173) Umpqua River is entered 22.7 miles north of Coos Bay. Some lumber, sand, crushed rock, and oil are barged on the river, but commercial traffic is very light. The customs port of entry is at Coos Bay.


(175) The south point at the entrance to the river is marked by sand dunes, partly covered with trees, that reach elevations of 300 feet. About a mile below the entrance is a bright bare spot in the dunes that shows prominently among the trees. Shifting sand dunes about 100 feet high are on the spit on the north side of the entrance.

(176) Umpqua River Light (43°39'44"N., 124°11'55"W.), is shown from a white conical tower just south of the mouth of the river. Trees surround the light, but the lantern shows over the tops.

(177) The entrance to the river is protected by jetties. The south jetty extends 1,200 yards seaward from the shoreline and is marked by a light with a seasonal sound signal and radar reflector. About 160 yards of the outer end of the jetty is submerged. A lighted whistle buoy, about 0.9 mile west of the south jetty light, marks the approach. A 086.1° lighted range and lighted buoy mark the entrance channel which is subject to frequent changes. The middle jetty extends from the shoreline and connects with the outer section of the south jetty. The north jetty extends 1,100 yards seaward from the shoreline. The river channels are marked by lighted ranges, lights, buoys, and daybeacons. A Coast Guard lookout tower is about midway out on the middle jetty.

(178) 
 COLREGS Demarcation Lines
(179) The lines established for the Umpqua River are described in 33 CFR 80.1325 chapter 2.

(180) 
 Channels
(181) A Federal project provides for depths of 26 feet in the entrance channel, thence 22 feet to Gardiner and Reedsport, and 22 feet in the turning basin at Reedsport. (See Notice to Mariners and latest edition of chart for controlling depths.)

(182) The channel over the bar is reported shoalest usually during September. Later in the season the river cuts a deeper channel through the bar. Depths in the channels and basins may vary considerably between dredging operations.

(183) 
 Coast Guard
(184) The Coast Guard has established Umpqua River Regulated Navigation Area Warning Sign, a rough bar advisory sign visible from the channel looking seaward, on Winchester Point about 1.5 miles inside the river entrance, to promote safety for small-boat operators. The sign is diamond-shaped, painted white with an international orange border, and with the words “Rough Bar” in black letters. The sign is equipped with two quick flashing yellow lights that will be activated when hazardous conditions exist and the bar is restricted to recreational and uninspected passenger vessels. Boaters are cautioned, however, that if the lights are not flashing, it is no guarantee that conditions are favorable.

(185) A heavy weather flag a square RED flag with a square BLACK center, will be displayed on a pole that is located on the north side of the Coast Guard lookout tower at the Umpqua River entrance and is visible to mariners from both directions to indicate that winds 48 knots and above are forecast for the area. Display of flags are required from one hour before sunrise to one hour after sunset. Weather flags are flown at select Coast Guard stations to supplement other weather notification sources. Light signals corresponding to these flags are not displayed at night. In all cases mariners should rely upon National Weather Service broadcasts as their primary source of government provided weather information.

(186) Umpqua River Coast Guard Station is in East Basin about 2.3 miles from the entrance.

(187) 
 Supplies
(188) Gasoline, diesel fuel, water, and fuel oil for launches may be obtained at Reedsport.

(189) 
 Repairs
(190) A machine shop is at Reedsport; a marine railway here can handle craft to 150 feet. A tidal graving dock for barges, 260 feet long and 60 feet wide, is operated by this firm across the river. Hull and engine repairs for small craft can be made at East Basin.

(191) West Basin and East Basin 1.8 and 2.3 miles above the entrance respectively, are small-craft basins entered through dredged channels that lead from the main river channel. The entrance channel to West Basin is marked by a light and daybeacon and the entrance to East Basin is marked by two lights. (See Notice to Mariners and the latest edition of chart for controlling depths.)

(192) The village of Winchester Bay is a fishing resort on the east side of East Basin. A fish wharf with cold storage and ice plant on its outer end is on the west side of the basin. Berths with electricity, gasoline, diesel fuel, water, ice, launching ramps, marine supplies, and an 8-ton crane are available in East Basin.

(193) Gardiner is on the northeast bank of the river, 8.5 miles inside the entrance. A dredged channel branches off the main channel and leads to a turning basin near the town. There is a public small-craft launching ramp at Gardiner.

(194) Reedsport on the southwest bank of the river, 10 miles inside the entrance, is a station on the railroad and the principal town on the river. A plywood plant and a sawmill are in the town. The plywood plant wharf, at the entrance to Scholfield Creek, is in ruins and not used. The sawmill barges lumber intermittently from the port wharf, which is between the swing bridges; the wharf has about 18 feet along the loading face. A lumber wharf, used occasionally, is on the northwest end of Bolon Island.

(195) The U.S. Route 101 highway bridge crossing the river at the upper end of the turning basin at Reedsport has a swing span with a clearance of 36 feet. Just west of the bridge is a power cable with a clearance of 152 feet; the least clearance of cables above the highway bridge is 95 feet. The railroad bridge, 500 yards above the highway bridge, has a swing span with a clearance of 16 feet. (See 33 CFR 117.1 through 117.59 and 117.893 chapter 2, for drawbridge regulations.)

(196) At high tide Umpqua River is navigable by vessels of 6-foot draft to Scottsburg 14.8 miles above Reedsport.

(197) Scholfield Creek enters Umpqua River north of Reedsport. The entrance to the creek is marked by daybeacons. A fixed highway bridge with a clearance of 20 feet crosses the creek 0.9 mile above the mouth and a railroad bridge with a 30-foot fixed span and clearance of 16 feet crosses the creek 2 miles above the mouth. Overhead power cables with a least clearance of 41 feet cross the creek between the two bridges.

(198) Smith River enters Umpqua River from the northeast at Reedsport. The controlling depth is about 5 feet for 5 miles above the mouth, thence 2 feet to Sulphur Springs Landing 18 miles above the mouth. The highway bridge, 2.7 miles above the mouth, has a retractable span with a clearance of 22 feet. (See 33 CFR 117.1 through 117.49 chapter 2, for drawbridge regulations.) An overhead telephone cable with a clearance of 67 feet crosses the river just below the bridge.

(199) 
 Chart 18580

(200) From Umpqua River for 21 miles to Siuslaw River, the coast is straight and consists of sand dunes broken only by the mouths of Threemile Creek Tahkenitch Creek Siltcoos River and the stream from Cleawox Lake.

(201) 
 Charts 18583, 18580

(202) Siuslaw River 8.3 miles south of Heceta Head Light, has some logging operations, and finished lumber is barged to Pacific ports. Prominent from offshore is wooded Cannery Hill on the east side of the river 1.4 miles above the entrance. The customs port of entry is at Coos Bay.

(203) 
 COLREGS Demarcation Lines
(204) The lines established for the Siuslaw River are described in 33 CFR 80.1330 chapter 2.

(205) The river is entered through a dredged channel between two partially submerged jetties; caution is advised. The river then leads south to a turning basin off the town of Florence, 4.4 miles above the entrance, thence east for about 2 miles to Cushman. A light, seasonal sound signal, and a Coast Guard tower are on the north jetty. The channel is marked by a 094.3° lighted entrance range and by other ranges and navigational aids to 1 mile above Florence. The uncharted buoys at the mouth of the river are frequently shifted to mark the best water. The bar at the entrance is narrow, and the depths vary greatly because of storms and freshets. The entrance and south jetty shoals tend to build during late winter and spring. Mariners are advised to contact Siuslaw River Coast Guard Station on VHF-FM channel 16 before attempting to cross the bar. A Federal project provides for an 18- to 16-foot depth in the entrance channel to the highway bridge at Florence; thence 16 feet in the turning basin; thence 12 feet to Cushman. (See Notice to Mariners and latest editions of the chart for controlling depths.)

(206) The Coast Guard has established Siuslaw River Regulated Navigation Warning Sign, a rough bar advisory sign 37 feet above the water, visible from the channel looking seaward, on the Coast Guard lookout tower on the north jetty, to promote safety for small-boat operators. The sign is diamond-shaped, painted white with an international orange border, and with the words “Rough Bar” in black letters. The sign is equipped with two quick flashing amber lights that will be activated when hazardous conditions exist and the bar is restricted to recreational and uninspected passenger vessels. Boaters are cautioned, however, that if the lights are not flashing, it is no guarantee that sea conditions are favorable.

(207) A heavy weather flag a square RED flag with a square BLACK center, will be displayed on a pole that is located on the southwest corner of the Coast Guard station and is visible to mariners from both directions to indicate that winds 48 knots and above are forecast for the area. Display of flags are required from one hour before sunrise to one hour after sunset. Weather flags are flown at select Coast Guard stations to supplement other weather notification sources. Light signals corresponding to these flags are not displayed at night. (See illustration, Chapter 1.) In all cases mariners should rely upon National Weather Service broadcasts as their primary source of government provided weather information.

(208) Siuslaw Coast Guard Station is on the east side of the river, 1.3 miles above the entrance.

(209) Florence is a small town on the north bank of Siuslaw River 4.4 miles above the entrance. A bascule highway bridge with a clearance of 17 feet crosses the river from Florence to Glenada a small settlement on the south bank of the river opposite Florence. (See 33 CFR 117.1 through 117.59 and 117.889 chapter 2, for drawbridge regulations.) An overhead power cable with a clearance of 23 feet crosses the river about 150 yards east of the bridge; the cable is submerged at the main channel. Another overhead power cable with a clearance of 88 feet crosses the river about 1 mile above the bridge.

(210) A cannery wharf, and a small port-operated boat basin, and marina are at Florence; fish are shipped by truck. Another marina, about 0.15 mile west of the bridge, has about 80 berths, dockside electricity, gasoline, water, ice, launching ramp, and marine supplies; minor engine repairs can be made. The Port of Siuslaw Marina, about 0.3 mile east of the bridge, has over 250 berths, gasoline, diesel fuel, water, ice, some marine supplies, and launching ramps. Wet and dry winter storage is also available.

(211) Cushman on the north bank of the river 2 miles above Florence, has lumber and shingle mills. The products from these mills are shipped by rail and barge. A small-craft repair facility here has a marine railway that can handle craft to 60 feet long, for engine and hull repairs. A 50-ton hoist is also available for handling small craft. About 50 berths with electricity, water, and a launching ramp are available. Wet and dry winter storage is also available at this facility. A large marine supply firm is at Cushman. An overhead power cable with a clearance of 75 feet crosses the river at Cushman. The railroad bridge across the river, 1 mile above Cushman, has a swing span with a clearance of 15 feet. (See 33 CFR 117.1 through 117.59 and 117.889 chapter 2, for drawbridge regulations.) An overhead power cable with a clearance of 80 feet crosses the river at Mapleton.

(212) Light-draft vessels can go to Mapleton 17 miles above the mouth, but the channel is narrow and crooked. A barge facility, about 14 miles above the mouth of the river, ships wood products and some perishable goods downriver.

(213) 
 Chart 18580

(214) From Siuslaw River for 7.5 miles to Heceta Head, the coast is composed of sand dunes that are quite conspicuous in contrast with the dark trees partly covering them.

(215) Heceta Head 28.5 miles north of Umpqua River Light, has a seaward face 2.5 miles long with nearly vertical cliffs 100 to 200 feet high. The summit of the head reaches an elevation of 1,000 feet 0.5 mile from the cliffs and is covered with grass and a few pines. A sharp black conical rock, 180 feet high, marks the extreme west and north part of the head, and is easily made out from either north or south. Cox Rock 1.5 miles south of the south part of the head, is conical and usually white on top with bird droppings.

(216) Heceta Head Light (44°08'15"N., 124°07'42"W.), 205 feet above the water, is a private light shown from a 56-foot white conical tower on a bench cut in the high bluff near the west extremity. Because of the high bluff north of the light, vessels from north will not make out the tower or buildings until abreast of the station.

(217) Heceta Bank 70 miles north-northwest of Cape Blanco and 30 miles offshore west of Heceta Head, covers an irregular area about 30 miles long and 10 miles wide. The least depth on the bank is 25 fathoms, but the depths are irregular. The depths north and south of the bank are considerably greater.

(218) From Heceta Head to Cape Perpetua, a distance of 9 miles, the coast consists of high broken rocky cliffs, except for the first 2 miles which are composed of much lower sloping sandy cliffs, backed by a strip of clear land. The hills behind reach an elevation of over 800 feet in less than 0.5 mile from the beach, and are heavily wooded.

(219) Tenmile Creek 5 miles north of Heceta Head, is marked by a sand beach about 0.3 mile long at its mouth.

(220) Cape Perpetua is 9 miles north of Heceta Head and consists of two projecting points; the north point is the bolder of the two. The cape reaches a height of 800 feet a short distance from the beach and 1,000 feet at a distance of 0.8 mile. The rocky cliff forming the face of the north point is reddish. A few rocks that uncover are close to its face.

(221) Yachats River navigable only for canoes, breaks through the coast hills immediately north from Cape Perpetua.

(222) The coast for 2.5 miles north of Cape Perpetua consists of cliffs, 15 to 30 feet high, with a narrow strip of grassy land 0.2 to 1 mile wide behind them. Thence for 5.5 miles to Alsea Bay there are low bluffs, with a broad sand beach in front and comparatively low wooded country behind them.

(223) Table Mountain 11 miles northeast of the mouth of Alsea Bay, is flat-topped, covered with dead trees, and looks whitish. Another summit is 0.6 mile southwest of Table Mountain.

(224) Mary Peak a prominent mountain 24 miles east of the entrance to Yaquina Bay, is wooded on its sides, but its summit is covered with grass.

(225) 
 Chart 18561

(226) Alsea Bay is 68 miles north of Cape Arago. The north point is low, broad, and sandy, but the south point is an abrupt sandstone cliff about 100 feet high, covered with trees. The entrance has a shifting bar with a depth of about 6 feet. With a rising tide, the bar fills in with sand and the full effect of the tide cannot be counted on. There are considerable fishing and crabbing in the bay and river, but boats rarely cross the bar. Waldport a mile inside the entrance, is the principal settlement. A marina with about 100 berths, gasoline, and a launching ramp is on the northeast side of the town. The river, marked by seasonal private buoys, is navigable by small craft to about 10 miles above the mouth. There are several marinas along the river above Waldport; most have berths and gasoline. Outboard engine repairs can be made at a marina about 3 miles above the mouth.

(227) The fixed bridge of the Oregon Coast Highway crossing Alsea Bay, a mile inside the entrance, has a clearance of 66 feet.

(228) 
 COLREGS Demarcation Lines
(229) The lines established for Alsea Bay are described in 33 CFR 80.1335 chapter 2.

(230) The 11.5-mile coast between Alsea Bay and Yaquina Bay is nearly straight, and consists of a low sand beach backed by dunes at each end with bluffs up to 100 feet high between; the land behind is low and wooded with areas of second-growth timber. Rocks covered 2 to 4 fathoms extend almost 2 miles offshore. Seal Rocks abreast the highest part of the bluffs about 5 miles north of Alsea Bay entrance, extend up to 0.5 mile offshore for 2 miles; the tallest is 20 feet high.

(231) Stonewall Bank 17 miles southwest of Yaquina Head Light and 14 miles offshore, is 9 miles long in a north direction and 2.5 miles wide. There is a least depth of 13 fathoms on the bank. An unmarked submerged obstruction is close southwest of Stonewall Bank in about 44°29.8'N., 124°24.9'W.

(232) Yaquina Head 32.5 miles north of Heceta Head, is distinguished by two conical hills covered with grass. The outer one is 356 feet high and the inner 390 feet high, with a low saddle between them. The extremity of the point, which projects about a mile from the general trend of the coast, is broken and rocky, but comparatively low. One mile inland from the point, the grass-covered land changes to a dense forest and the hills rise rapidly. Two covered ledges lie north of the point 0.6 mile from the beach. There is a covered rock and considerable kelp about a mile south of the point. A patch of rocks that uncovers 8 feet is about a mile north of Yaquina Head Light. South to Yaquina Bay, the coast consists of broken yellow cliffs, bordered on the south part by broad sand beaches.

(233) Yaquina Head Light (44°40'36.3"N., 124°04'46.0"W.), 162 feet above the water, is shown from a 93-foot white conical tower on the flat bench projecting at the west extremity of the head.

(234) Yaquina Reef and its continuation north is a ridge of hard sand and rock covered 4 to 25 feet and marked by breakers. The reef extends from the submerged outer end of the north jetty and parallel to the shore to Yaquina Head. The submerged wreck of the ship JOHN ASPIN is about 0.65 mile north from the outer end of the north jetty.

(235) South Reef with a least depth of 8 feet, is a continuation of Yaquina Reef, the two being separated by the entrance channel.

(236) 
 Chart 18581

(237) Yaquina Bay entrance is 4 miles south of Yaquina Head Light. The bay is a tidal estuary, the harbor itself being merely the widening of Yaquina River just inside the entrance.

(238) The north point of Yaquina Bay entrance is a sandy bluff, 120 feet high. A lighthouse and a Coast Guard lookout tower are on the high part of the point. When viewed from the northwest, the circular lighthouse tower on the roof of a two-story frame dwelling obscures the lower portion of the lookout tower. The south entrance point is a low sand beach backed by dunes rising to 150 feet.

(239) The entrance to Yaquina Bay is protected by jetties 330 yards apart. The long north jetty, with the outer 100 yards submerged, extends out to Yaquina Reef. A seasonal sound signal is near the seaward end of the south jetty and a light is about 200 yards inside the seaward end. A lighted whistle buoy is 1.5 miles southwest of the entrance. The channels are marked by lighted ranges, lights, and buoys. Between the jetties, numerous submerged rocks lie along the outside of the charted entrance channel limits.

(240) During the summer, when the swell is approximately parallel with the coast, the bar is comparatively smooth, being partially sheltered by Yaquina Head. In winter, however, the heavy west swell makes the bar very rough. A smooth bar and a favorable tide are necessary for large vessels leaving Yaquina Bay.

(241) 
 Coast Guard
(242) The Coast Guard has established Yaquina Bay Entrance Regulated Navigation Area Warning Sign (44°37'29"N., 124°03'27"W.), at the Coast Guard station on the north side of the river at Newport. The sign is 22 feet above the water and diamond-shaped, painted white with an international orange border, with the words ROUGH BAR. The sign is equipped with four quick flashing lights that will be activated when the bar is restricted to recreational and uninspected passenger vessels. Vessel operators are cautioned, however that if the lights are not flashing, it is no guarantee that sea conditions are favorable.

(243) A heavy weather flag a square RED flag with a square BLACK center, will be displayed on a pole that is located on the western corner of the Coast Guard station and is visible to mariners from both directions to indicate that winds 48 knots and above are forecast for the area. Display of flags is required from one hour before sunrise to one hour after sunset. Weather flags are flown at select Coast Guard stations to supplement other weather notification sources. Light signals corresponding to these flags are not displayed at night. (See illustration, Chapter 1.) In all cases mariners should rely upon National Weather Service broadcasts as their primary source of government provided weather information.

(244) 
 COLREGS Demarcation Lines
(245) The lines established for Yaquina Bay are described in 33 CFR 80.1340 chapter 2.

(246) 
 Channels
(247) A Federal project provides for a 40-foot entrance channel, thence 30 feet from the first turn in the channel to and in the turning basin at McLean Point, thence 18 feet to Yaquina, thence 10 feet to Toledo at the head of the project. Controlling depths may be considerably less than these project depths. (See Notice to Mariners and latest editions of the charts for controlling depths.)

(248) At the entrance to Yaquina Bay and River, the buoys cannot be relied upon to indicate the best water, and in the river, depths are subject to frequent change. Recreational boaters unfamiliar with the area are advised to contact the Coast Guard on VHF-FM channel 16 or telephone 541–265–5381 for the latest bar conditions, advisory, or to arrange an escort when unfamiliar with bar conditions. Professional mariners desiring to enter Yaquina Bay and River should employ a pilot or someone with local knowledge.

(249) A fixed highway bridge across the channel, about 1.3 miles above the entrance, has a clearance of 129 feet. Yaquina Bay Coast Guard Station is on the north side of the bay, 400 yards northeast of the bridge.

(250) NOAA's Marine Operations Center-Pacific operates a pier on the south side of Yaquina Bay, one-quarter mile east of the highway bridge, which serves as the shipbase for the Administration’s Pacific Fleet. The north face of the pier has a 520-foot berth, 260-foot berth and another 520-foot berth, from west to east, with 24 to 27 feet alongside. The east end of the south face of the pier has a 230-foot berth with 22 to 26 feet alongside. The berths are marked by four private lights. There is a 215-foot floating dock inshore at the east end of the pier. The waters inside the pier are restricted to authorized traffic only. To report emergencies or suspicious activity at this pier contact the Facilities Manager at (541) 867-8735.

(251) Newport just inside the north entrance point, is the principal town on the bay and river. The town has a considerable fishing industry with several small fish-processing plants. Lumber, logs, paper and plywood, either barged from upper river mills or delivered by truck, are shipped from the wharves at McLean Point just east of Newport.

(252) 
 Currents
(253) The current velocity is about 2.4 knots on the flood, and 2.3 knots on the ebb, in Yaquina Bay entrance. Near Newport docks the velocity is about 0.5 knot. Off Yaquina, and 1 mile south of Toledo, the velocity is about 1.4 knots. (See the Tidal Current Tables for predictions.)

(254) Pilotage, Yaquina Bay
(255) Pilotage is compulsory for all foreign vessels and U.S. vessels under register. Pilotage is optional for U.S. vessels in the coastwise trade that have onboard a pilot licensed by the Federal Government for these waters. Pilotage for Yaquina Bay is available from Coos Bay Pilots Association. See Pilotage, Coos Bay, indexed as such, earlier this chapter for details.

(256) Pilots usually board vessels about 0.5 mile west of Yaquina Bay Approach Lighted Whistle Buoy Y (44°35'52"N., 124°06'47"W.).

(257) 
 Towage
(258) Tugs are available from Toledo and Coos Bay.

(259) 
 Quarantine, customs, immigration and agricultural quarantine
(260) Newport is a customs port of entry. (See Vessel Arrival Inspections, chapter 3.)

(261) Quarantine is enforced in accordance with regulations of the U.S. Public Health Service. (See Public Health Service, chapter 1.)

(262) 
 Wharves
(263) There are two deep-draft wharves in Yaquina Bay. The wharf at McLean Point, about 1 mile east of the highway bridge has two berths. Berth 1, just north of the turning basin, has 465 feet of berthing space, 30 to 32 feet reported alongside, and a deck height of 21 feet. Berth 1 was reported under construction until June 2011. Berth 2 (barge dock), just northeast of the turning basin, has 250 feet of berthing space, 25 feet reported alongside, and a deck height of 15 feet. A concrete Ro/Ro extension connected to Berth 2 has 140 feet of berthing space in line with Berth 1, 30 feet reported alongside, and a deck height of 14 feet. Logs, lumber, plywood, and paper are shipped from both berths. The wharf is owned and operated by the Port of Newport.

(264) 
 Small-craft facilities
(265) The Port of Newport operates a boat basin on the south side of the bay about 350 yards east of the bridge. The basin is protected to the north and west by jetties marked on the outer ends by a daybeacon and a light, respectively. A dredged entrance channel leads through the jetties, thence south along the west jetty turning east at the foot and terminating at a boat ramp at the head of the boat basin. In 2008, the controlling depth was 6 feet. Gasoline berths, diesel fuel, electricity, water, ice, and a pumpout facility are available. Hull, engine, and shaft repairs can be made. Facilities can be contacted on VHF-FM channel 12 by hailing the Port of Newport South. The Port of Newport Internet address is portofnewport.com.

(266) The Port of Newport operates a commercial moorage on the north shore about 0.7 mile above the highway bridge; a marina is also in this area. The moorage area is protected from the main channel by a detached breakwater marked by a light at each end. Berths for about 206 vessels, gasoline, diesel fuel, electricity and water are available; marine supplies can be obtained in Newport. The marina can be contacted on VHF-FM channel 12 by hailing “Port of Newport North”. A marine repair facility is just north of Oneatta Point 3.8 miles above the highway bridge at the entrance to the bay. The facility has two travel lifts, one 15-ton and one 70-ton, and two 60-ton cranes.

(267) 
 Communication
(268) Communication is by highway and air. The municipal airport is about 4 miles south of Newport. A U.S. highway extends north and south along the coast, and a State highway leads to the interior.

(269) Yaquina is a small settlement 4.2 miles above the entrance. A power cable across Yaquina River, 0.5 mile above Yaquina, has a clearance of 77 feet. At Yaquina, there is moorage and a 6,000 pound hoist. Fuel and supplies can be purchased. Several small marinas are along the river between Newport and Toledo. (See Newport small-craft facilities description.)

(270) Toledo about 11.5 miles above the entrance has large lumbermills and a papermill. The least depths alongside the wharves are 10 feet. Toledo also has a moorage capability for about 20 boats 65 feet or less. There is access to a 40-ton travel lift and a 300-ton marine dry dock. The fixed highway bridge, 0.5 mile above Toledo, has a clearance of 34 feet. An overhead pipeline with a clearance of 54 feet crosses Depot Slough just above the mouth. Overhead pipelines 0.3 mile above the mouth of the slough have a clearance of 18 feet.

(271) 
 Chart 18520

(272) From Yaquina Head to the mouth of Columbia River, the coast is fairly straight. The headlands are Cape Foulweather, Cascade Head, Cape Lookout, Cape Meares, Cape Falcon, and Tillamook Head. The 30-fathom curve follows the general trend of the coast about 3.5 miles offshore, without indicating the several headlands. When about opposite Tillamook Head, the curve swings W and is about 7.5 miles off the end of Clatsop Spit.

(273) 
 Chart 18561

(274) From Yaquina Head for 5.5 miles to Cape Foulweather, the coast consists of yellow and white sandstone cliffs, low and broken. Iron Mountain 1.5 miles northeast of Yaquina Head Light, is a 654-foot-high hill. When viewed from the south, the highest third of the hill is bare and composed of a red rock formation, the north side and lower part of the hill are covered with thick brush.

(275) A low flat rock, 8 feet high, is 0.4 mile offshore 2.8 miles north of Yaquina Head.

(276) Otter Rock 11 feet high, is 3.2 miles north of Yaquina Head and 0.6 mile offshore. Gull Rock 56 feet high, is 1.2 miles north of Otter Rock and 0.4 mile offshore. In line between the two rocks is a kelp field with several rocks, covered and awash. Covered rocks that break are 0.5 to 1 mile north of Gull Rock.

(277) Cape Foulweather is a prominent headland with about 6 miles of seaward face consisting of rocky cliffs over 60 feet high. The cape is formed by several grass-covered headlands, separated by densely wooded gulches. Near the middle of the cape is a strip of flat land, 0.5 mile long and 0.2 mile wide, bare of trees. The highest point of the cape is near the south part. A grassy patch is conspicuous on the southwest slope. A white building with a red roof, 0.7 mile north-northeast of Gull Rock, is prominent on the high bluff just south of Cape Foulweather. About 0.9 mile southeast of the extreme west point of the cape is a rocky point 445 feet high, and east of the point the hills rise to 1,100 feet in 0.6 mile. Dangers extend for nearly 2 miles north of the north point of Cape Foulweather and about 600 yards offshore.

(278) The coast highway follows the shoreline closely at Cape Foulweather.

(279) Depoe Bay 8 miles north of Yaquina Head, has one of the best small-boat shelters along this part of the coast. The bay proper has foul ground on both the north and south sides, but the channel leading to the narrow dredged channel to the inner basin is deep and well marked. The foul areas break in moderate seas and are marked by kelp. Prominent from seaward is the concrete arch bridge over the entrance to the basin. A lighted whistle buoy is 1.1 miles west of the entrance to the bay. A lighted bell buoy and 085.5° lighted range mark the entrance to the bay and the approach to the dredged channel to the basin, respectively. A mariner radio activated sound signal, located on the south side of the entrance is about 50 yards southwest of the bridge, and is initiated by keying the microphone five times on VHF-FM channel 83A.

(280) 
 COLREGS Demarcation Lines
(281) The lines established for Depoe Bay are described in 33 CFR 80.1345 chapter 2.

(282) The fixed concrete arched bridge over the entrance is unusual in that its width of 30 feet is less than the clearance of 42 feet. The navigator is cautioned against the dangerous surge in the narrow entrance to the basin. Boats over 50 feet long cannot enter the basin without a special waiver from the harbormaster, and then only at highwater. The entrance should not be attempted at night or in rough weather without local knowledge. Depoe Bay Coast Guard Station at the inner basin, monitors VHF-FM channel 16 or may be contacted at 541–765–2123.

(283) 
 Coast Guard
(284) The Coast Guard has established Depoe Bay Regulated Navigation Area Warning Sign, a rough bar advisory sign 25 feet above the water, visible from the channel looking seaward, on a building on the north side of the basin entrance channel, to promote safety for small-boat operators. The sign is diamond-shaped, painted white with an international orange border, and with the words “Rough Bar” in black letters. The sign is equipped with two quick flashing amber lights that will be activated when hazardous conditions exist and the bar is restricted to recreational and uninspected passenger vessels. Boaters are cautioned, however, that if the lights are not flashing, it is no guarantee that sea conditions are favorable.

(285) A heavy weather flag a square RED flag with a square BLACK center, will be displayed on a pole that is located approximately 50 yards north of the bridge across the entrance to Depoe Bay, on the west side of highway 101 to indicate that winds 48 knots and above are forecast for the area. Display of flags are required from one hour before sunrise to one hour after sunset. Weather flags are flown at select Coast Guard stations to supplement other weather notification sources. Light signals corresponding to these flags are not displayed at night. (See illustration, Chapter 1.) In all cases mariners should rely upon National Weather Service broadcasts as their primary source of government provided weather information.

(286) The town of Depoe Bay is on the north side of the basin. The basin has a concrete bulkhead, mooring floats, and a tidal grid for minor hull repair work. Also available are berths with electricity, gasoline, diesel fuel, water, ice, launching ramp, and marine supplies. Hull and engine repairs can be made.

(287) 
 Chart 18520

(288) From Cape Foulweather for 9.5 miles to the entrance of Siletz Bay, the coast continues as yellow broken bluffs, 40 to 100 feet high, bordered by about 3 miles of sandy beaches. From the north point of the bluffs to the bay entrance are sand dunes covered with low brush.

(289) The entrance to Siletz Bay is 15 miles north of Yaquina Head. The entrance channel is subject to frequent change, and drafts of 4 or 5 feet are considered the deepest that can be safely taken in at high water.

(290) The north point at the entrance is a low bluff with a narrow sand beach. The south point is a low sandspit about 250 yards wide. The dunes on the spit are thinly wooded near the shore, but become thickly wooded inland. Several houses are on the spit. The bay inside the entrance is shoal. Siletz River enters the bay at the southeast end.

(291) Taft and Cutler City are communities on the bay; both are parts of Lincoln City which is 1.8 miles north. There are several marinas on the bay; a facility just above the highway bridge at the mouth of Siletz River has gasoline, water, ice, a launching ramp, and some marine supplies. Outboard engine repairs can be made here. The highway bridge just below the marina has a clearance of 31 feet.

(292) From Siletz Bay the coast extends 7 miles north to the Salmon River. For 2.5 miles of this stretch to the outlet of Devils Lake the yellow standstone cliffs are 80 to 100 feet high. The lake is a large body of freshwater, 10 feet above sea level, that empties through a narrow stream. At 0.5 mile west-southwest of the mouth of the stream is a covered rock that generally breaks. For 3 miles north from the outlet of the lake, the bluffs are 20 to 60 feet high, rising to grassy hills. A broad beach and ledges of rocks are along the shore.

(293) Salmon River empties at the south extremity of Cascade Head; the entrance is nearly closed by sandbars.

(294) Immediately south of Salmon River is a rocky cliff whose seaward face is 0.6 mile long. The summit is a dome-shaped butte 510 feet high. From here a rolling grassy plateau with a few trees extends south and east to the river. A rock, 46 feet high, is 700 yards west of this cliff, and about a mile south is a covered rock 630 yards off the beach. Immediately south of and in line with Cascade Head, opposite the mouth of the river, are three grayish rocks about 765 yards offshore. These have heights of 56 feet on the north, 25 feet in the center, and 47 feet on the south.

(295) Cascade Head 23 miles north of Yaquina Head, is very jagged and heavily wooded. The face of the cliff is 3 miles long, is over 700 feet high in places, and is cut by several deep gorges through which the waters of three creeks are discharged in cascades 60 to 80 feet high. Several rocks are about 0.1 mile offshore.

(296) Two Arches 30 feet high, is a rock 0.9 mile north of the south point of Cascade Head. The arches are visible from north; the inner is the larger.

(297) From Cascade Head for 9.5 miles to Cape Kiwanda, the coast is a low sand beach with a narrow marsh behind the south part. Rolling hilltops, occasionally wooded, rise to an elevation of 500 feet behind the beach.

(298) Neskowin Rock at the high-water line about 0.3 mile north of the north extremity of the cliffs marking Cascade Head, rises abruptly from the sand beach to 113 feet in height. The rock is dark brown and wooded on top.

(299) North of Neskowin Rock the Oregon Coast Highway is about 0.5 mile inland. At night the headlights of automobiles traveling this road cause intermittent flashes as they make the turns and might be mistaken for lights of vessels.

(300) Nestucca River empties into Nestucca Bay 5.5 miles north of Cascade Head. The channel over the bar changes frequently in position and depth, and only light-draft vessels having local knowledge are able to cross. A fixed highway bridge at Pacific City has a clearance of 10 feet. The river has many snags that change the depths and shift the channel. Even in a moderate sea, the bar is extremely dangerous. The point on the side side of the entrance consists of several low-rolling, grassy hillocks, about 400 to 500 feet high, which approach very close to the beach. The north point is the south extremity of the sandspit and dunes that extend to Cape Kiwanda.

(301) Pacific City is a summer resort about 3 miles above the entrance to Nestucca Bay. Gasoline and supplies are available in the community.

(302) Haystack Rock 327 feet high, 0.5 mile southwest of Cape Kiwanda and 0.5 mile offshore, is a prominent landmark. The rock is conical and dark for about half its height, and in summer the top is whitened by bird droppings.

(303) Cape Kiwanda 33 miles north of Yaquina Head, is a low yellow rocky point, much broken and eroded, that projects about 0.5 mile from the general trend of the coast. Behind the cape are bright sand dunes, 500 feet high, which are prominent from seaward. Just south of Cape Kiwanda is a beach resort area; a public launching ramp is here. A whistle buoy is about 0.7 mile west of the cape.

(304) From Cape Kiwanda the coast extends 7.5 miles in a general north direction to Cape Lookout. It is broken about halfway by the entrance to Sand Lake which is shallow and not navigable. The coast consists of sand beaches and dunes until about a mile north of Sand Lake where it changes to vertical sandstone cliffs, 50 to 100 feet high. These continue to Cape Lookout.

(305) Cape Lookout 40 miles north of Yaquina Head, projects west for 1.5 miles, forming a narrow rocky promontory 432 feet in height at its seaward extremity. The south face is nearly straight, and its precipitous cliffs have numerous caves. The north face is sloping and covered with a thick growth of timber. The ridge that forms the cape runs at about right angles to the coast, reaching an elevation of some 2,000 feet, 3.8 miles inland. The north face of the cape is smooth and bold for the first mile, and then is much broken and marked by caves and several cascades. Fair shelter in northwest winds may be had under the south side of the cape in 6 to 8 fathoms, sandy bottom.

(306) North of Cape Lookout for 4.5 miles, the land falls to a low narrow sandy peninsula, separating Netarts Bay from the ocean. The sand dunes on the peninsula are visible for 10 or 12 miles.

(307) Netarts Bay is a shallow lagoon most of which is bare at low water. The village of Netarts is on the North shore a mile inside the entrance. Only light-draft boats with local knowledge can enter. A small-boat basin with two floating piers and a launching ramp are at Netarts. North of the entrance to Netarts Bay, for 1.5 miles to the rocks forming the south part of Cape Meares, the coast is a sandy beach, backed by cliffs 50 to 120 feet high. These cliffs, topped by sand dunes varying in height from 150 to 200 feet, are good landmarks.

(308) 
 COLREGS Demarcation Lines
(309) The lines established for Netarts Bay are described in 33 CFR 80.1350 chapter 2.

(310) 
 Chart 18558

(311) Cape Meares 48 miles north of Yaquina Head, is high and rocky, with a 2-mile-long seaward face. The north part is the higher, with nearly vertical cliffs 640 feet high. The west point is narrow, covered with fern and brush, and terminates seaward in a cliff 200 feet high.

(312) Three Arch Rocks are the largest of a cluster extending 350 yards off the south point of the cape. They range in height from 204 to 275 feet. The largest arch is in the middle of the lowest rock, and is about half the height of the rock above water. These rocks are the favorite resort of sea lions, whose barking can be heard a considerable distance with a favorable wind.

(313) Pillar Rock (45°29'22"N., 123°58'49"W.) lies off Cape Meares and is 75 feet high. Pyramid Rock 0.4 mile northwest of Pillar Rock is 110 feet high and leans seaward. A submerged rock covered 34 feet, lies 0.4 mile northwest of Pyramid Rock.

(314) From Cape Meares to Kincheloe Point, the coast is a low partly wooded sandspit, with dunes 40 to 50 feet high. It forms the west shore of Tillamook Bay. A sand dike prevents a breakthrough north of Cape Meares, at Pitcher Point.

(315) Tillamook Bay entrance is 42 miles south of the Columbia River, 25.5 miles south of Tillamook Rock, and 5 miles north of Cape Meares. The bay has a tidal area of about 13 square miles, most of which, at low tide, presents a succession of sand and mud flats. There is no commercial traffic in the bay except for fishing boats and pleasure craft.


(317) Kincheloe Point is low and sandy and appears to be an island from a distance to the north. The north side of the entrance is the termination of a high wooded ridge extending between the bay and Nehalem River. Green Hill opposite Kincheloe Point, is a 400-foot spur that terminates in a bluff rounded point. The prominent hill is covered by ferns, grass, and dense brush with trees on top.

(318) Tillamook Bay Coast Guard Station is on the north shore west of Garibaldi. A lookout tower is near the intersection of the north entrance jetty and the shore.

(319) 
 COLREGS Demarcation Lines
(320) The lines established for Tillamook Bay are described in 33 CFR 80.1355 chapter 2.

(321) The entrance to Tillamook Bay is protected by jetties. The north jetty extends about 600 yards offshore; the westernmost 150 yards of the jetty is submerged. The south jetty extends 1000 yards offshore with the westernmost 100 yards submerged. Extreme caution should be taken in the vicinity of the jetties. A Federal project provides for an 18-foot entrance channel that crosses the bar and leads eastward between the jetties through the north part of Tillamook Bay to an inactive turning basin just west of Miami Cove. An access channel leads to a 12-foot small boat basin at the town of Garibaldi. (See Notice to Mariners and latest editions of charts for controlling depths.)

(322) The main approach to Tillamook Bay is from the south. A lighted whistle buoy is 1.3 miles south-southwest of the seaward end of the north jetty and a lighted bell buoy is near the entrance. The north jetty is marked by a light and seasonal sound signal. There is a leading light marking the center of the jetties which signals when the mariner is clear of the south jetty and safe to make the approach into the bay. Mariners should use caution while making the approach to the jetties due to frequent shoaling and heavy breakers in the vicinity of the approach channel. The channel to Garibaldi is marked by lights. Caution is advised during periods of heavy seas.

(323) Several visible and covered rocks are on the north side of the dredged channel. Sow and Pigs across the channel from Kincheloe Point and nearly 500 yards off the north shore, is a rocky ledge that uncovers 1 to 6 feet. The ledge is dangerous when entering with a flood current, as the current sets toward it.

(324) 
 Currents
(325) The current velocity is 3 knots in the entrance to Tillamook Bay.

(326) 
 Coast Guard
(327) The Coast Guard has established Tillamook Bay Regulated Navigation Area Warning Sign, a rough bar advisory sign on the north side of the entrance channel near the lookout tower, visible from the channel, to promote safety for small-boat operators. The sign is diamond-shaped, painted white with an international orange border and with the words rough bar in black letters. The sign is equipped with two quick flashing amber lights that will be activated when hazardous conditions exist and the bar is restricted to recreational and uninspected passenger vessels. There is also a regulated navigation area warning sign on the north side of the channel near the entrance to Garibaldi boat Basin with similar characteristics. Boaters are cautioned that if the lights are not flashing, it is no guarantee that sea conditions are favorable.

(328) Garibaldi a lumber and fishing town, is on the north shore 2 miles inside the entrance. A grey concrete stack and a silver elevated tank are conspicuous. There are several small fish companies at Garibaldi.

(329) The town has a boat basin for commercial and sport fishing vessels. Berths for about 250 craft, electricity, gasoline, diesel fuel, water, ice, a launching ramp, and marine supplies are available at the basin. A drydock in the basin can handle craft to 100 tons, 68 feet long, or up to 9 feet in. draft. Repair work must be arranged for independently of the drydock operator; complete marine repairs can be made.

(330) South of Garibaldi, unmarked Bay City Channel follows the east side of Tillamook Bay to the south end where it continues through narrow and crooked Hoquarten Slough to Tillamook, 11 miles above Tillamook Bay entrance. The channel has a depth of about 6 feet to Bay City, 4.4 miles above Tillamook Bay entrance, but south of this point depths are less than 3 feet to Tillamook. During freshets, snags are carried into the upper part of the bay where they form a menace to navigation.

(331) Bay City has a small oyster cannery on an earth-fill pier. Fishing and crabbing are carried on in the vicinity, but all shipments are made by truck or rail.

(332) Tillamook is noted for the production of cheese. It is the distributing center for a rich farming and dairying section.

(333) Tillamook River empties into the south part of Tillamook Bay just west of the entrance to Hoquarten Slough. A fixed highway bridge with a clearance of 15 feet crosses the river about 0.7 mile above the mouth. A small marina is just south of the bridge on the west bank of Trask River just inside the mouth; berths with electricity, water, ice, gasoline, a launching ramp, and marine supplies are available. Outboard engine repairs can be made. This marina is open only during the summer. Depths of about 2 feet can be carried in Tillamook River to the highway bridge. Wet and dry winter boat storage is available at the marina.

(334) 
 Chart 18520

(335) From Tillamook Bay to Nehalem River, the coast is nearly straight for about 5 miles. Several lakes in this stretch are separated from the beach by wooded sand dunes. The heavily wooded hills begin to rise 0.5 mile to 0.8 mile from the beach and in 1 mile reach elevations of 1,000 to 1,600 feet.

(336) Twin Rocks are 700 yards offshore and 2 miles north of the entrance to Tillamook Bay. Their bases are so close together that they usually look like one rock. The south and larger has an arch in it.

(337) 
 Chart 18556

(338) Nehalem River 5 miles north of Tillamook Bay entrance, is tidal for about 10 miles from the entrance. Above this point the river is a mountain stream full of riffles and obstructed by boulders. The river constitutes a natural outlet for an extensive area of heavily timbered country. Lumbering and fishing are the principal industries. Sawmills are along the lower river.

(339) 
 COLREGS Demarcation Lines
(340) The lines established for the Nehalem River are described in 33 CFR 80.1360 chapter 2.

(341) Nehalem Beach the north point at the entrance, is a narrow sandspit, bare of trees, and with dunes of moderate elevation over the north part. The south side of the entrance is a low broad sand beach, backed by wooded country rising to elevations of 400 feet.

(342) The entrance is protected by jetties extending 600 yards from the shoreline, though there are a number of breaks in the jetties. A private range marks the entrance channel. Mariners are advised to seek local knowledge before using the entrance channel because of seasonal changes.

(343) The depths on the bar and within the bay are not sufficient for coastwise shipping. The controlling depth is about 4 feet on the bar, and 3 to 8 feet to Wheeler. The channel is changeable.

(344) A marina is on the east side of the river just inside the entrance. Berths with electricity, gasoline, water, ice, launching ramp, and marine supplies are available. Engine repairs can be made; wet winter boat storage is also available.

(345) Brighton is a small settlement on the east shore, 1 mile inside the entrance to the river. A marina is at Brighton. Berths with electricity, gasoline, water, ice, and a launching ramp is at the marina. Dry winter storage and engine repairs are available. Wheeler 4.7 miles above the entrance, has an abandoned sawmill, a launching ramp, and wharf in ruins. All traffic is by truck.

(346) Nehalem is a small settlement on the west shore of the river, 6.3 miles above the entrance. A fixed highway bridge over the river just below Nehalem has a clearance of 30 feet. Close north of this bridge is an overhead power cable with a clearance of 52 feet. A surfaced launching ramp is on the east side of the river about 0.1 mile below the highway bridge.

(347) 
 Charts 18520, 18003

(348) The coast is low and sandy for about 3 miles north of Nehalem River entrance, then a dense forest begins which rises gradually to the south slope of Neahkahnie Mountain. There are grassy hillocks, 40 to 100 feet high, in the vicinity of the beach.

(349) Cape Falcon 17 miles north of Cape Meares and 10 miles south of Tillamook Rock, projects about 2 miles from the general trend of the coast. The seaward face, less than 0.5 mile in extent, is very jagged with numerous rocks under the cliffs. The southwest point of the cape is composed of nearly vertical cliffs, 200 feet high, and is partially timbered. Falcon Rock 0.7 mile west of the cape, is small and not very conspicuous.

(350) Smuggler Cove a small bight just south of Cape Falcon, is an excellent anchorage for small boats. The best anchorage is close to the north shore in 4 to 5 fathoms, protected from all except southwest winds. Care should be taken to avoid two rocks, bare at extreme low water, that are about 150 yards from the north shore of the cove and rise abruptly from deep water.

(351) Neahkahnie Mountain 2.8 miles inland of Cape Falcon, is a prominent landmark, and the most important feature for locating Nehalem River. The west summit of the double-headed mountain is rounded and 1,900 feet high, but the east summit is serrated and divided into three peaks of nearly equal height. The entire southeast slope is bare of timber, but is covered with grass and fern. The seaward face terminates in rocky broken cliffs over 500 feet high, and there are a few rocks about 100 feet from the beach. The two summits are visible from south; from north, the west summit hides the east and is very conspicuous.

(352) Northeast of Cape Falcon, and 2 to 3 miles back from the shoreline, is a group of peaks; the highest and most prominent has a rounded summit, with a very gentle slope to the south and a more marked and abrupt drop to the north. It is very conspicuous from west in clear weather.

(353) Arch Cape rocky and precipitous, projects slightly from the general trend of the coast. It is the termination of a mountain ridge rising to 2,775 feet about 3 miles east. The cape is bare of timber. A high rock is close to the cape and connected with it at low water. A smaller rock is about 100 yards seaward of the larger. There are several other high rocks in the vicinity of the cape.

(354) Castle Rock derives its name from its remarkable resemblance to a medieval castle with two towers, the taller of which is on the seaward end. It is about 0.8 mile west of the highest part of Arch Cape, and is the outermost bare rock. The upper part of the rock is covered with bird droppings and shows up very distinctly in sunlight. A rock awash is about 0.9 mile off the cape and 0.4 mile southwest of Castle Rock; another rock, bare at lowest tides, is 0.5 mile offshore and 1 mile south of Castle Rock.

(355) Hug Point is a small cliff close to the beach, 1.8 miles north of Arch Cape; the cliffs in its vicinity are above 180 feet high.

(356) Double Peak halfway between Cape Falcon and Tillamook Head, is the seaward end of a ridge extending east that reaches a height of 1,050 feet in less than 0.7 mile from the shore. It is heavily wooded and pitches abruptly to the sea, ending in a rocky broken cliff 100 feet high and 0.2 mile long. A rock is close to and abreast of the south end of the cliff; another rock is close to and abreast the north end. A ledge, with two rocks that uncover about 4 feet, is about a mile west-southwest of the highest part of the cliff.

(357) From Double Peak, the coast extends north for 2.7 miles to the mouth of Ecola Creek and then turns sharply northwest for the same distance to the west point of Tillamook Head. The coast is high and wooded with broken cliffs bordered by numerous rocks, except at Cannon Beach at the mouth of Ecola Creek.

(358) Haystack Rock 1.5 miles north of Double Peak, is the largest of a cluster of rocks stretching out from the low-water line to 10 fathoms. A rock awash at low water and surrounded by about 9 fathoms is 0.8 mile southwest of Haystack Rock.

(359) Tillamook Head 76 miles north of Yaquina Head, ends in two points which are 0.5 mile apart. The cliffs are 560 feet high at the south point and 1,000 feet high at the north point. A pinnacle rock is at the foot of the north cliffs, and extending offshore from it for 300 yards is a cluster of rocks, 45 to 150 feet high, the outer one being the lowest. The summit of the head is flat and densely wooded, with slightly lower land behind it.

(360) Tillamook Rock nearly 1.2 miles west of the south point of Tillamook Head, has an abandoned lighthouse and buildings on it. The west face leans a little seaward. A rock awash is between Tillamook Rock and the nearest part of Tillamook Head.

(361) North of Tillamook Head the coast is a broad sand beach extending for 17 miles to Clatsop Spit, on the south side of the entrance to Columbia River. Low sandy ridges, covered with grass, fern, and brush, extend parallel with and back of the beach. Necanicum River a small stream, empties at the summer resort of Seaside 2.5 miles from the north side of Tillamook Head.

(362) Saddle Mountain double-headed and 3,283 feet high, is the landfall for the approach to the Columbia River. The mountain is 14 miles east of Tillamook Rock and is visible 50 miles offshore. From northwest, the mountain appears to be triple-headed; the northeast peak appears cone shaped, sharp, and lowest; the middle peak is irregularly cone shaped; and the south and highest peak is a flat-topped cone.