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Coast Pilot 7 - Chapter 10 - Edition 49, 2017



Columbia River, Oregon and Washington

(1) This chapter describes the Columbia River from its mouth at the Pacific Ocean to the head of navigation above Richland, WA. Also described are its two major tributaries, the Willamette River in Oregon and the Snake River in Washington and Idaho. The deep-draft ports of Astoria, Longview, Portland, and Vancouver are described as well as many smaller ports.

(2) Note: The nautical charts covering the Columbia, Willamette, and Snake Rivers show statute mile designations. However, the distances given in the text for these waterways are the nautical miles above their respective mouths with the statute mile equivalents shown in parentheses. Unless otherwise indicated, all other distances are given in nautical miles.

(3) Mile 0.0 on the Columbia River, is at the junction of the Main Channel Range and a line joining the outer ends of the jetties. The distance to the mouth of the Columbia River from a position 0.5 mile west of the Columbia River Approach Lighted Whistle Buoy CR is 5.8 (6.6) miles.

(4) Conversion tables, nautical miles to statute miles, and statute miles to nautical miles are in Appendix B. Mileage conversion scales are also shown on the nautical charts.

(5) 
 COLREGS Demarcation Lines
(6) The lines established for the Columbia River are described in 33 CFR 80.1365 chapter 2.

(7) 
 Caution
(8) The volcanic eruptions of Mount Saint Helens in mid-1980 caused extensive flooding with resulting heavy siltation in the lower Columbia River. Large amounts of mud, logs, and other debris entered Columbia River from Cowlitz River, just east of Longview at Mile 59 (68). In late 1980, dredging was done in the aforementioned area, however, mariners are advised to use caution in the Columbia River and its tributaries. Self-propelled hopper dredges, dredge barges and pipeline dredges may be encountered throughout the transit from sea to Bonneville Dam. Mariners should contact these vessels on VHF-FM channel 13 to make passing arrangements, and navigate with due caution through these areas.

(9) Rice Island, Miller Sands, Jim Crow Sands and Cottonwood Islands are used for dredging disposal sites. Elevations of these islands constantly change, as well as the overall shape and dimensions.

(10) 
 Charts 18003, 18007

(11) Columbia River rises in British Columbia, Canada, through which it flows for some 370 (425) miles before entering the continental United States in northeast Washington. Thence it flows south to its junction with Snake River, from which it curves west and forms the boundary between the States of Washington and Oregon for the remainder of its course to the Pacific Ocean. Its entrance is 548 miles north of San Francisco and 145 miles south of the Strait of Juan de Fuca. The length of the river is 647 (745) miles in the United States. Between the Cascade Mountains, the river flows through a canyon averaging about 5 miles wide between high cliffs on each side; of this width, the river occupies about 1 mile, the rest being marsh, low islands, and lowlands. Near the mouth, the river becomes wider, and in some places is 5 miles across.

(12) Columbia and Willamette Rivers are navigable by deep-draft vessels to Vancouver, WA, and Portland, OR. Barges navigate the Columbia River to Pasco and Kennewick, WA, 286 (329) miles above the mouth.

(13) Navigation on the tributary Snake River, which joins the Columbia at Pasco, is possible to Lewiston, Idaho. The hydro-electric powerplants at the dams on the Columbia provide the major supply of electricity for the entire Northwest.

(14) The commerce, both foreign and domestic, is extensive. The exports are principally logs, lumber, and forest products, grain, flour, chemicals, fruit, fish, general and containerized cargo, and general merchandise; the imports are coal, petroleum products, bulk salt, bulk cement, alumina, manufactured, and general and containerized cargo.

(15) There are numerous settlements and landings, but Astoria, OR; Longview, WA; Vancouver, WA; and Portland, OR are the principal shipping points. The distances above the mouth of the Columbia River to these ports are, respectively, 12 (14) miles, 58 (66) miles, 92 (106) miles, and 97 (112) miles; Portland is on the Willamette River 9 (10.5) miles above its junction with the Columbia. The Columbia River has major highways (State, U.S. and Interstate) on the south and north sides connecting principal cities and the towns in between.

(16) 
 Prominent features
(17) Columbia River Approach Lighted Whistle Buoy CR (46°11'05"N., 124°11'03"W.), about 5.3 miles southwest of the entrance to Columbia River, has red and white vertical stripes and is equipped with a racon.

(18) Mount Saint Helens nearly 8,500 feet high with a truncated-cone shape, is about 75 miles east of the entrance to the river. On a clear day it is visible when looking up the valley from seaward. Mount Hood and Mount Adams are lofty snow-covered peaks, which are also visible from parts of Columbia River on a clear day.

(19) In 1980, several volcanic eruptions occurred from Mount Saint Helens. Mount Saint Helens’ eruptions were the first in the continental United States since the volcanic eruption of Mount Lassen in northern California in 1915; both volcanoes are part of the Cascade Range.


(21) 
 Chart 18521

(22) Clatsop Spit on the south side of the entrance, is a low sand beach, extending about 2.5 miles northwest from Point Adams. There is a tendency for the shoal north of the spit to build up to the northwest because of spring freshets and northwest storms; vessels are cautioned to keep informed about conditions at the spit.

(23) Point Adams just inside Clatsop Spit, is a low sandy point covered with spruce and undergrowth to the edge of the sand beach and low dunes. The point usually shows well from seaward, particularly if it is hazy inside.

(24) Cape Disappointment the rugged north point at the Columbia River entrance, is the first major headland along the 20 miles of sand beach north from Tillamook Head. It comprises a group of rounding hills covering an area 2.5 miles long and 1 mile wide, divided by a narrow valley extending north-northwest. The seaward faces of these hills are precipitous cliffs with jagged, rocky points and small strips of sand beach. Cape Disappointment Light (46°16'33"N., 124°03'08"W.), 220 feet above the water, is shown from a 53-foot white conical tower with white horizontal band at top and bottom, and black horizontal band in the middle, on the south point of the cape. Cape Disappointment Coast Guard Station is at Fort Canby on the east side of the cape.

(25) From the south, Cape Disappointment shows as three low knobs, separated by low flat ridges. North Head Light shows on the west slope of the west knob. From the west, the cape is not prominent, but it stands out clearly when there is fog, haze, or smoke inside the cape. From northwest, the cape appears as a flat island with a slight depression in the center and a timbered knob at each end. From this direction, a low, flat hill with gently sloping sides between the cape and high ridges east appears as an island from a distance.

(26) McKenzie Head 0.8 mile northwest of Cape Disappointment Light, is 190 feet high and nearly round. On its seaward face it is covered with grass and fern; bare of trees. On its east face it is heavily wooded with spruce.

(27) North Head the extreme west point of the cape, is 270 feet high, with a very jagged, precipitous cliff, backed by a narrow grassy strip; the higher ground behind it is covered with trees. North Head Light (46°17'56"N., 124°04'41"W.), 194 feet above the water, is shown from a white conical tower, with black roof and round topmark, on the west point.

(28) The entrance to Columbia River is marked by two jetties. The south jetty extends 2.7 miles seaward from the northwest end of Clatsop Spit; the westernmost mile of the jetty is submerged. The north jetty extends 800 yards seaward from the shoreline on the north side of the entrance. The north and south jetties have suffered severe deterioration and may no longer be correctly represented on the nautical charts of the area. Mariners should ensure extra caution when transiting in the vicinity of the jetties and river entrance.

(29) 
 Channels
(30) Federal project depths in the Columbia River are 55 feet (48 feet in southern quarter) over the bar, thence 43 feet past the confluence of the Willamette and Columbia Rivers to the lower turning basin at Vancouver; and thence 35 feet through the upper turning basin at Vancouver. (See Notice to Mariners for controlling depths.) Additional information can be obtained from the Corps of Engineers, Portland, OR. (See Appendix A for address.)

(31) Above Vancouver the Federal project depth is 27 feet for about 75 (86) miles to The Dalles, thence 14 feet for about 87 (100) miles to McNary Dam. The Federal project also provides for a 15-foot barge channel which extends southeast from the south side of the upper turning basin at Vancouver and connects with the 27-foot channel about 1 mile upriver. An alternate barge channel, just south of and running parallel to the barge channel, extends southeast to the 27-foot channel. Controlling depths throughout the river channels and basins may be considerably less than project depths. The depths over the lower sills of the locks at The Dalles, John Day, and McNary Dams may be the controlling depth for this stretch of the river; the least sill depth (at McNary Dam) will usually exceed 12 feet at normal pool level. In the pool above McNary Dam to Pasco and Kennewick, depths range from 14 to 115 feet. Navigation on the Snake River is possible to Lewiston, ID. (See Notice to Mariners for controlling depths.) Additional information can be obtained from the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Portland, OR and Walla Walla, WA. (See Appendix A for addresses.)

(32) 
 Depths
(33) Minimum depths are given at mean lower low water from the entrance of the Columbia River to Harrington Point, thence at Columbia River Datum to Bonneville Dam on the Columbia River, and Willamette Falls Locks at Oregon City on the Willamette River. Columbia River Datum is the mean lower low water during lowest river stages. The staff gage at the Columbia River Pilots’ Office, at the foot of 14th Street at Astoria, OR, is set with zero at mean lower low water. The staff gages on the bars from Harrington Point to Portland, OR, are set with zero at Columbia River Datum. Above the Willamette Falls Locks, at Oregon City, depths of the Willamette River are at Willamette River Datum. Above Bonneville Dam depths of the Columbia River are referred to the normal pool level of the various dams on the Columbia River.

(34) 
 Anchorages
(35) General anchorages are in the Columbia River. (See 33 CFR 110.1 and 110.228 chapter 2, for limits and regulations.)

(36) 
 Bridges and cables
(37) Clearances of bridges and cables over Columbia River and its tributaries are at mean lower low water below Harrington Point and at Columbia River Datum between Harrington Point and Bonneville Dam. Above Bonneville Dam the clearances are referred to the normal pool level of the various dams on the Columbia River. On the Willamette River above the Willamette Falls Locks, at Oregon City, clearances are referred to the datum of Newburg Pool. Minimum clearance of cable crossing the main channel of the Columbia and Willamette Rivers to Portland and Vancouver is 216 feet.

(38) 
 Caution regarding aids to navigation
(39) During the seasonal high-water conditions, aids to navigation may be destroyed or rendered unreliable. Mariners are warned to exercise caution in navigating the river and to obtain the latest information regarding aids to navigation by local inquiry and through local Notice to Mariners, available upon request to the Commander, 13th Coast Guard District, Seattle, (see Appendix A for address). Every effort is made to restore the aids to operating condition as soon as possible.

(40) 
 Weather, Columbia River, Oregon and Washington
(41) The maritime climate near the Columbia River’s mouth slowly turns continental as you head upstream. Temperatures become warmer in summer and colder in winter. Daily temperatures vary more. Rain and fog are less frequent, but the chance of snow is greater. In the Columbia River Gorge, winds are deflected and channeled by topography.

(42) Average winter daytime temperatures vary from the upper forties (8.9° to 9.4°C) near the mouth to the upper thirties (3.3° to 3.9°C) near the Snake River junction. At night, this range is from the mid-thirties (0.6° to 2.8°C) to the mid-twenties (-5.0° to -2.8°C). Cold spells occur with an outbreak of frigid Canadian air. Extreme temperatures range from the low teens (-11.7° to -11.1°C) near the coast to below zero upriver (-18.3°C). Snow, of a significant amount, falls on 2 to 5 days each year, and is most likely upriver. Occasionally, an ice storm or “silver thaw” will occur; this happens most often between the Gorge and Vancouver. While winds are strongest in late fall and winter, they seldom reach gale force along the Columbia. Extremes of 75 knots have occurred; strongest winds are usually out of the south or southwest. Wind flow is generally from the east through southeast in winter, and wind speeds reach 17 knots or more about 5 to 10 percent of the time. However, locally at Troutdale, winds blow at 17 knots or more up to 30 percent of the time. Fog drops winter visibilities below 0.5 mile (0.9 km) on about 3 to 6 days per month.

(43) Spring temperatures rise slowly near the mouth of the Columbia, compared to the rise upriver. By April, daytime temperatures upriver average in the midsixties (17.2° to 19.4°C), while those near the mouth are in the midfifties (11.7° to 13.9°C). Average low temperatures are near 40°F (4.4°C) everywhere. Rain and fog become less frequent than they were in winter. Gales are rare and winds of 17 knots or more blow less than 5 percent of the time except locally around The Dalles, where winds of 17 knots or more occur 18 to 25 percent of the time from April through August. By April, winds are generally out of the west through northwest. Flooding on the Columbia is most likely to occur from April through June, when snow melt at its headwater is most rapid. While flooding is kept under control, to a great extent, by multi-purpose dams, heavy rains during the melting season can trigger floods.

(44) Summer winds remain west through northwest and generally light. Near the mouth of the river, these maritime winds have a cooling effect. They keep average daytime temperatures below 70°F (21.1°C) at Astoria and below 80°F (26.7°C) at Portland. This effect diminishes upstream, and east of the Cascades daytime temperatures average close to 90°F (32.2°C). Lows at night fall into the low fifties near the coast and upper fifties (14.4° to 15.0°C) inland. Rain falls on only a few days per month, usually in the form of showers or thunderstorms. Toward late summer, fog becomes a hazard near the mouth. At Astoria, visibilities fall below 0.5 mile (0.9 km) on about 4 days in August.

(45) Fog spreads upstream to Portland and Troutdale by September. During the fall, fog reduces visibilities to less than 0.5 mile (0.9 km) on 4 to 8 days per month, west of the Columbia River Gorge. The difference in fog east and west of the Gorge does not extend to temperatures. The temperature range is smallest in fall. In October, daytime high temperatures range from the low sixties (16.1° to 16.7°C) near the mouth to the midsixties (17.2° to 19.4°C) upriver, while average low temperatures vary from the mid-forties (6.1° to 8.3°C) near the coast to the low forties inland (5.0° to 5.6°C. By October, winds begin to blow more out of the east through southeast and become stronger. While gales are infrequent, winds of 17 knots or more occur 4 to 10 percent of the time. Rain falls on about 5 to 15 days per month west of the Cascades and 2 to 6 days per month to the east.

(46) 
 Lower Columbia Region Harbor Safety Plan
(47) The Lower Columbia Region Harbor Safety Committee has developed a Lower Columbia Region Harbor Safety Plan that formally establishes Standards of Care for the Columbia River and its navigable tributaries from the seaward approaches to the Columbia River Entrance to Bonneville Dam. The standards contained in the Lower Columbia Region Harbor Safety Plan complement and supplement existing federal, state, and local laws. These standards were developed and adopted by local experts to improve maritime safety but do not replace the good judgment of a ship’s master in the safe operation of a vessel. The Harbor Safety Plan provides important safety information and good marine practices for professional and recreational mariners transiting the Lower Columbia Region. The Harbor Safety Plan is available at lcrhsc.org.

(48) 
 Routes, Columbia River approach
(49) The lights at the entrance and at Willapa Bay 28 miles north, are distinguishing marks for determining a vessel’s position and subsequent shaping of her course.

(50) In thick weather, great caution is essential on the approach from any direction. The currents are variable and uncertain. Velocities of 3 to 3.5 knots have been observed between Blunts Reef and Swiftsure Bank, and velocities considerably in excess of those amounts have been reported. Under such conditions, vessels should keep outside the 30-fathom curve until Columbia River Approach Lighted Whistle Buoy CR has been made.

(51) In clear weather, vessels should have no difficulty in entering the river as the aids to navigation are numerous. In thick weather, however, when aids cannot be seen, strangers should not attempt to enter without a pilot.

(52) Dredges will usually be found at work in the channels; these dredges should be passed with caution and reduced speed. (See 33 CFR 162.225 chapter 2, for navigation regulations.)

(53) Weather, Cape Disappointment
(54) An estimate of bar conditions, visibility, and weather may be obtained by radio from the Coast Guard station at Cape Disappointment.

(55) 
 Currents
(56) The currents in the Columbia River and approaches are described in the Tidal Current Tables.

(57) 
 Caution
(58) The Columbia River bar is reported to be very dangerous because of sudden and unpredictable changes in the currents often accompanied by breakers. It is reported that ebb currents on the north side of the bar attain velocities of 6 to 8 knots, and that strong northwest winds sometimes cause currents that set north or against the wind in the area outside the jetties.

(59) In the entrance the currents are variable, and at times reach a velocity of over 5 knots on the ebb; on the flood they seldom exceed a velocity of 4 knots. The current velocity is 3.5 knots, but this tidal current is always modified both as to velocity and time of slack water by the river discharge. On the flood there is a dangerous set toward Clatsop Spit, its direction being approximately east-southeast; on the ebb the current sets along the line of buoys. Heavy breakers have been reported as far inside the entrance as Buoy 20, north of Clatsop Spit.

(60) (See the Tidal Current Tables for daily predictions.)

(61) 
 Freshets
(62) The annual high-water freshet stage on the Columbia occurs in the latter part of May, but on Willamette River the peak-flow period usually begins mid-December and continues through February, according to measurements taken by the U.S. Geological Survey over the past 70 years. Thus, the Willamette is low or nearly so at the time of the peak flow on the Columbia in late May. This causes the Willamette to apparently change direction under the influence of the stronger flow or “backup” from the Columbia, which change is apparent at least as far up the Willamette as the city of Portland.

(63) On Columbia River, the freshet flow causes some shoaling in the dredged cuts, but redredging is done to maintain project depths.

(64) Since logging is one of the main industries of the region, free floating logs and submerged deadheads or sinkers are a constant source of danger in the Columbia and Willamette Rivers. The danger is increased during spring freshets. Deadheads or sinkers are logs which have become adrift from rafts or booms. One end of the sinker settles to the bottom while the other end floats just awash, rising and falling with the tide.

(65) 
 Ice
(66) Ice forms occasionally in both the Willamette and Columbia Rivers, but it is seldom heavy enough to affect navigation seriously.

(67) Pilotage, Columbia River and Bar
(68) Pilotage across the Columbia River bar and up or down the river is compulsory for U.S. vessels enrolled or sailing under Registry and all foreign vessels, except foreign recreational or fishing vessels not more than 100 feet in length or 250 gross tons international.

(69) Columbia River Pilots and Columbia River Bar Pilots serve Columbia River and its tributaries, from the entrance over the bar to the head of navigation. Larger ports served are Astoria and Portland, OR; Vancouver, Kalama, and Longview, WA.

(70) Pilotage is provided by the Columbia River Bar Pilots for the river entrance, from the open sea 5 miles from shore by a line described in ORS 776.025 to a line across the Columbia River along longitude 123°44’00” W., and by the Columbia River Pilots from the line across the Columbia River along longitude 123°55'00" W., to the head of navigation on the Columbia or Willamette Rivers and their tributaries. The State of Oregon has also established a Columbia River bar precautionary zone, 7 miles seaward of the Columbia River bar pilotage ground out to 12 miles from shore described in ORS 776.030 of which no person shall pilot any vessel intending to enter or depart the Columbia River bar pilotage ground, except pursuant to instructions from the Columbia River bar pilots. The Columbia River Pilots office address is: 13225 N. Lombard, Portland, OR 97203; telephone 503–289–9922; Fax 503–289–9955. The Columbia River Bar Pilots office address is: 100 16th Street, Astoria, OR 97103; telephone 503–325–2641; Fax 503–325–5630; email dispatch@columbiariverbarpilots.com

(71) All vessels requesting the service of the Columbia River Bar Pilots are requested to give notification of their time of arrival directly to the Columbia River Bar Pilots, Astoria (not through agent) at least 12 hours in advance by telephone or fax, or email to the pilot office in Astoria. The Columbia River Bar Pilots office is capable of communicating by VHF radio with vessels offshore at distances greater than 60 miles. If the arrival time changes due to weather or other causes, the Columbia River Bar Pilots are to be notified no later than 4 hours before the original ETA expires. Failure to communicate in a timely manner directly to the Columbia River Bar Pilots may result in delay. Marine exchange, vessel agents and Columbia River Pilots are advised of information received by the Columbia River Bar Pilots. When incoming from sea without the service of a Columbia River Bar Pilot, vessels or agents must give notice to the Columbia River Pilots between the hours of 0800 and 1600, and at least 12 hours prior to estimated time of arrival at Astoria. The call may be placed to the Columbia River Bar Pilots office in Astoria, OR.

(72) When ordering a Columbia River Bar Pilot, the following information is required:

(73) 1. Complete name and type of vessel.

(74) 2. The date and time of vessel ETA at the Pilot Station.

(75) 3. Maximum fresh water draft. If vessel is not even keel, provide fore and aft fresh water drafts.

(76) 4. Any pertinent special information or instructions about the vessels and its arrival.

(77) Embarking and disembarking Columbia River Bar Pilots is accomplished by helicopter or boat. All vessels are required to contact Columbia River Bar Pilots via VHF channel 9, 13, or 16 at least two hours before their ETA. The call sign for the Bar Pilot office is KOK-360. Vessels will be asked to confirm arrival time and are advised to call in again when 15 miles from the CR buoy via VHF channels 9 or 13. At that time vessels will be advised of pilot boarding instructions. The primary method of pilot boarding is by helicopter. The Bar Pilots also keep one of 2 pilot boats on standby at all times. Vessels should not approach the CR buoy until advised by a pilot. While awaiting a pilot boarding by helicopter or pilot boat, vessels should stay within a marshaling area approximately 5 miles west of the CR buoy. Pilots boarding by helicopter will generally board within 4 to10 miles northwest to southwest of the CR buoy. Boarding by pilot boat generally takes place in the vicinity of the CR buoy.

(78) 
 Helicopter Transfer Procedures
(79) 
 General:
(80) Operations will be in accordance with ICAO regulations and with the International Chamber of Shipping’s Guide to Helicopter/Ship Operations rules. The pilot helicopter SEAHAWK is 43 feet long with a rotor span of 36 feet and has a yellow body with the word PILOT prominently displayed on the side. Vessel configuration, sea state and wind force will determine if a hoist or landing will be conducted. To provide the highest degree of safety for boarding, the Master may be requested to alter course or speed of the vessel, if safe to do so. The objective is to provide minimum roll of the vessel at the time of transfer.

(81) 
 Communication:
(82) 1. After initial contact, the arriving vessel shall call in to Columbia River Bar Pilots on VHF channel 9 when 15 miles from the CR buoy.

(83) 2. Pilot helicopter “SEAHAWK” will then be dispatched to the vessel with the Marine Pilot.

(84) 3. The arriving vessel must remain on VHF channel 9 for helicopter operations until the marine pilot is safely transferred and the helicopter has departed the area.

(85) 
 Masters, prior to helicopter arrival must confirm the following:
(86) 1. Check that no wires or aerials are above the helicopter maneuvering zone.

(87) 2. Check that no loose objects are in or near the helicopter maneuvering zone.

(88) 3. At night the vessel should be illuminated with all available deck lighting, but not in such a way as to blind the helicopter crew. Deck lights must remain ON until the helicopter has departed the area.

(89) 4. Assisting crewman should wear eye protective goggles.

(90) 5. Camera flashlight equipment must not be used as it will interfere with the helicopter crew's night vision.

(91) 6. If requested by helicopter-pilot, switch ship's radar to “stand-by”.

(92) 7. DO NOT CHANGE COURSE OR SPEED unless instructed by helicopter.

(93) 8. If conditions are rough, a trail/tag line may be used:

(94) a. The vessel crew tending the trail line must ensure that the line is not tied to the vessel and does not become fouled with the vessel.

(95) b. The vessel crew tending the trail line shall use it to guide the Marine Pilot to the intended hoist area using only enough force to stabilize and keep the Pilot from swinging into hazards.

(96) c. The trail line, when used, must NOT be fastened to the vessel.

(97) 
 Land on Deck operations:
(98) 1. All vessel crew assisting with the transfer must remain clear of designated helicopter maneuvering zone.

(99) 2. No vessel crew should ever approach the helicopter unless directed.

(100) 3. Never pass in back or in front of the helicopter while it approaches or is on deck.

(101) 
 Pilot Boat Transfer Procedures
(102) If the arriving vessel is advised that the pilot boat be utilized for pilot transfer, one of two boats will be used, as follows:

(103) The pilot boat ASTORIA is 72 feet long and has a yellow hull and yellow super structure with the word PILOT prominently displayed on the side of the house. The pilot boat COLUMBIA is also 72 feet long and has an orange hull and orange superstructure with the word PILOT prominently displayed on the side of the house. When either the ASTORIA or COLUMBIA are used, speed of the vessel should be approximately 10 to 12 knots and the pilot ladder should be rigged 2 meters above the waterline. With either boat, the ladder should be rigged on the side indicated by the pilot boat, as close to midship as possible, with no manropes, and clear of all discharges and obstructions. The ladder must be rigged in accordance with SOLAS requirements, and must be well lighted at night. When regulations require a combination ladder, it must be rigged as close to 7 meters above the water as possible. Manropes are required on outbound vessels.

(104) When transferring pilots off Astoria, pilot boat CONNOR FOSS is used. It is 63 feet in length with a dark green hull and white superstructure. The word PILOT is prominently displayed on the superstructure. When using the CONNOR FOSS, the pilot ladder should be rigged midship, 2 meters above the waterline, in accordance with SOLAS requirements. Maximum speed of the vessel should be 9 knots.

(105) Inbound vessels with drafts of 36 feet or greater are requested to arrive at Astoria 2 hours prior to Astoria high tide in order to take advantage of tidal conditions. Outbound vessels with drafts of up to 36 feet but less than 38 feet can generally sail at any time, but occasionally sailing times must be delayed to avoid transiting the river during extremely low tides. Outbound vessels with drafts of 38 feet or greater must have sailing times set to take advantage of optimum tidal conditions.

(106) Masters of vessels arriving at the Columbia River when the bar is not passable are advised to stand offshore at least 10 miles west of the Columbia River Approach Buoy “CR” and await instructions from the Columbia River Bar Pilots. Using the open roadstead in the vicinity of the Columbia River entrance as an anchorage is dangerous in any weather, and IS NOT recommended by the Columbia River Bar Pilots.

(107) A fixed amber light is maintained by the Columbia River Bar Pilots atop the pilot office at Astoria. When this light is exhibited it will inform outward bound vessels that desire a Bar Pilot that the bar is not passable and that the vessel should remain in port.

(108) Baker Bay is a shoal open bight, east of Cape Disappointment, formed by the cape and the recession of the land north. Sand Island low and flat, fronts the bay on the southwest side.

(109) A dredged channel leads north from the Columbia River along the west side of Sand Island thence to the Port of Ilwaco mooring basin about 3 miles above the entrance. The entrance is between two detached jetties marked at the channel ends by lights. The channel is marked by lights, daybeacons, lighted and unlighted buoys. The entrance usually has swells and is subject to continual change; the channel should be navigated only at high water with local knowledge. The rest of Baker Bay is covered with shoals and abandoned fish traps.

(110) Ilwaco is the base for a large commercial and sport fishing fleet. Berths with electricity, gasoline, diesel fuel, ice, water, and other supplies are available. The largest marine railway can handle vessels up to 75 feet long for all types of repairs. Lifts up to 50 tons are also available. Wet winter boat storage is available at this port. Machine and carpentry shops are at this boatyard. The Port of Ilwaco administers the docks and facilities of the port. For information about the channel or facilities, contact the port manager or harbormaster at 360–642–3143 or on VHF-FM channel 16.

(111) Desdemona Sands marked by a light near the west end, is a shoal area extending southeast for about 8 (9.2) miles from just inside the entrance to Columbia River. Desdemona Sands has the main river channel to the south and a secondary channel to the north. The southern section of Desdemona Sands is composed of shifting sand shoals that dry at low water. Only shallow draft vessels should attempt to navigate Desdemona Shoals; mariners are urged to use caution in the area.

(112) A boat basin is at Hammond; the entrance is marked by a light and a daybeacon on the east and west jetties, respectively. In 2008, a reported depth of 5 feet was available in the basin channel with shoaling to lesser depths at the south end. Berths with electricity, for about 140 craft, gasoline, diesel fuel, water, ice, marine supplies, and a launching ramp are available at the basin. Wet winter storage and minor repairs are available in the basin.

(113) A packing plant wharf is about 0.5 mile southeast of the boat basin at Hammond.

(114) Warrenton on the Skipanon Waterway at Mile 9.5 (11), is the base of a large sport fishing fleet. About 1 mile above the entrance to the waterway is a basin with a marina on the south side. Berths with electricity, gasoline, diesel fuel, water, ice, marine supplies, and a launching ramp are available. A marine railway that can handle boats up to 80 feet long is at the marina for hull repairs.

(115) The channel to the turning basin is marked by a 198°30' lighted range; lights mark the channel entrance.

(116) Above the waterfront area, the river is crossed by a fixed highway bridge with a clearance of 17 feet. A power cable upstream from the bridge has a clearance of 21 feet.

(117) Scarboro Hill 820 feet high, is on the Washington side about 7 (8) miles east of Cape Disappointment. It is a long, gradually rising ridge, covered with grass, fern, and some trees. A number of conspicuous light-colored buildings of the historical Fort Columbia State Park may be seen near the base of the hill.

(118) A dredged marked channel leads from Columbia River near the east end of Baker Bay to a basin at Chinook on the Washington side. Berths with electricity, gasoline, diesel fuel, water, ice, a launching ramp, and some marine supplies are available at the basin. A packing company wharf is at the basin. A 6-ton hoist is available for engine repair work. Wet winter storage is available in the basin.

(119) Smith Point at Mile 11.3 (13.0) on the Oregon side, is the W termination of a high, wooded ridge; it is the first prominent point on the south bank southeast of Point Adams. The ridge culminates in Coxcomb Hill 595 feet high, behind Astoria. The Astoria Column on the top of the hill is prominent.

(120) Youngs Bay is a shoal body of water just west of Smith Point. It receives the waters of Youngs River and Lewis and Clark River. The docks of a marine repair yard are 0.5 mile above the Old Route 101 highway bridge crossing the Lewis and Clark River. The yard can handle vessels up to 350 tons for hull and engine repairs. Traffic on the two rivers is confined chiefly to tugs handling log rafts just above the highway bridges. Small tugs operate to the town of Olney on Youngs River at high tide.

(121) A dredged channel leads from Columbia River through Youngs Bay to naturally deep water at the mouth of Youngs River. In 2007, the controlling depth in the dredged channel was 4 feet. A channel, marked by buoys and daybeacons, leads souith from the dredged channel in Youngs Bay to the mouth of the Lewis and Clark River. In 1992, the mouth of the river had shoaled to bare.

(122) Youngs Bay is crossed by U.S. Route 26/101 vertical-lift highway bridge with clearances of 39 feet down and 74 feet up, about 0.3 mile above the mouth. The bridgetender monitors VHF-FM channel 16 and works on channel 13, call sign WHG-914. The highway bascule bridge, 2.1 miles above the bay entrance at the entrance to Youngs River, has a clearance of 24 feet. (See 33 CFR 117.1 through 117.59 and 117.899 chapter 2, for drawbridge regulations.) In 2003, the north draw leaf of the bascule span was disabled. The least clearance of overhead cables across Youngs River to about 4 miles above the mouth is 103 feet.

(123) Over Lewis and Clark River, 0.8 miles above the mouth, is a highway bascule bridge with a clearance of 25 feet. The power cable at the bridge and the two about 1.8 miles above the mouth have a least clearance of 64 feet. The highway bridge, 4.8 miles above the mouth, has a fixed span 18 feet wide with clearance of 10 feet. (See 33 CFR 117.1 through 117.59 and 117.899 chapter 2, for drawbridge regulations.) Clearances and depths on Youngs River and Lewis and Clark River are at mean lower low water.

(124) Point Ellice on the Washington side 11 (12.7) miles inside the entrance, is the termination of a spur from the mountain ridge back of Scarboro Hill. The point is rounding and rocky, but not high. Two high hillocks lie behind the point. In this area there are many abandoned fish traps and pile structures that extend into the river.

(125) Astoria at Mile 12 (14) on the Oregon side, extends from Youngs Bay to Tongue Point. It is the principal city on the Columbia River below Longview, WA. It has connections with the interior by both rail and highway.

(126) 
 Anchorages
(127) General anchorages are north and west of Tongue Point. (See 33 CFR 110.1 and 110.228 chapter 2, for limits and regulations.)

(128) The fixed highway bridge between Astoria and Point Ellice has a clearance of 193 feet (205 feet at the center) over the main channel near Astoria. The span over the north channel near Point Ellice has a clearance of 48 feet.

(129) 
 Currents
(130) Above Astoria the current velocity is 1 to 3 knots except during the freshet period when the ebb is considerably increased although not enough to affect navigation seriously.

(131) Weather, Astoria
(132) Astoria’s perennially verdant landscape is hemmed by rather low mountains on the north, east, and south. On the west it is open to the Pacific Ocean over 4 miles (7 km) or more of low green dunelands and the last 10 miles (19 km) of the Columbia River.

(133) The average temperature in Astoria is 51°F (10.6°C). The average maximum is 58°F (14.4°C) while the average minimum is 44°F (6.7°C). Ninety degree-plus readings have been recorded only during the June through September period and the all-time high is 100°F (37.8°C) recorded in July 1961. Temperatures less than 40°F (4.4°C) have been recorded in every month and only June through September have escaped below-freezing temperatures. The extreme minimum is 6°F (-14.4°C) recorded in December of 1972 and 1990.

(134) The average precipitation for Astoria is just over 67 inches (1702 mm). December is the wettest month averaging 10.50 inches (267 mm) while July is the driest month averaging only 1.10 inches (27.94 mm). An average of 240 days each year record precipitation. Snowfall is unusual. The average annual snowfall total is only 4.3 inches (109.2 mm) but every month except June through September has recorded at least a trace. An average of 191 days each year has fog and it is somewhat evenly distributed throughout the year. May is the most fog-free month while October records the most foggy days.

(135) Weather hazards occasionally occur. Storms may sink or wreck ships. Even in fair weather, wind and wave may combine to produce a type of breaker known as the “widow-maker” and swamp a boat. Heavy rains inundate lowlands, and high tides aggravated by gales may push seawater across highways and up beaches. Rains may cause earthslides, mostly in highway cuts. Storms may fell trees or break power and phone lines. Lightning strikes are rare. Showers of small hail may briefly whiten the ground during many of the months. Occasionally in winter there may be rather brief periods of freezing temperatures, with snow or ice.

(136) The climate of Astoria is generally characterized by summers with cool breezes and waters, moderate temperatures and periods of fog. Heat waves are uncommon and usually brief. Winters often bring dampness, increased precipitation, storms, winds and cloudness with brief periods of freezing temperatures, snow and ice. (See Appendix B for Astoria climatological table.)

(137) Pilotage, Astoria
(138) See Pilotage, Columbia River and Bar, indexed as such, earlier this chapter.

(139) 
 Towage
(140) Tugs to 3,600 hp are available at Astoria with 12 hours notice. Arrangements for tugs are usually made in advance by ships’ agents. Barges of various size and application are available with prior arrangement.

(141) 
 Quarantine, customs, immigration and agricultural quarantine
(142) Astoria is a customs port of entry. (See Vessel Arrival Inspections, chapter 3.)

(143) Quarantine is enforced in accordance with regulations of the U.S. Public Health Service. (See Public Health Service, chapter 1.)

(144) 
 Coast Guard
(145) Two Coast Guard cutters are stationed at Astoria. A Coast Guard Air Station is at Warrenton-Astoria Regional Clatsop County Airport.

(146) 
 Harbor regulations
(147) Harbor regulations are prescribed by the Port of Astoria Board of Commissioners. The direct operation of the port is controlled by a port manager who is appointed by the Board.

(148) 
 Wharves
(149) The Port of Astoria is a municipal corporation embracing all of Clatsop County as a port district. The district extends from the mouth of the Columbia River to Westport (46°07'55"N., 123°22'07"W.), and includes the towns of Hammond, Warrenton and Astoria. The port owns a substantial part of the waterfront at Smith Point, and operates a well-equipped modern terminal with three piers. The port offices are at the head of Pier 2. For the latest information about depths alongside the piers, contact port authorities at 503–325–4521. Water and electrical shore power connections are available at most of the berths. General cargo at the port is usually handled to and from vessels by ships' tackle. Additional equipment, if available, is listed under Mechanical Handling Facilities in the table.


(151) 
 Supplies
(152) Most marine supplies and services are available at Astoria. Facilities for bunkering ocean-going vessels are maintained at Pier 2, about 0.3 mile east of the bridge. Bunkering is available at anchorage, arrangements can be made at least 12 hours in advance through the ships agent or Brix Maritime on VHF-FM Channel 10. Fishing vessels are fueled at Carmichael-Columbia Oil Inc. wharf, about 0.5 mile east of the bridge.

(153) 
 Repairs
(154) The largest marine railway in the Astoria area can handle vessels to 400 tons. Complete hull, engine, and electronic repairs can be made. Complete salvage equipment is available in Astoria.

(155) 
 Small-craft facilities
(156) Two mooring basins for small craft and fishing vessels are maintained by the Port of Astoria. The West Basin, 0.3 (0.3) mile west of the south end of the Astoria Bridge, has 15 feet reported through the entrance and depths of about 5 feet at the floats. The entrance to the basin is marked by private lights. Berths with electricity, gasoline, diesel fuel, water, ice, and some marine supplies are available. All types of repairs can be made at several private firms on the basin. A 10–ton hoist at a packing company just west of the basin can handle small craft in emergencies. The East Basin, 2 (2.3) miles east of the Astoria Bridge, has berths and a launching ramp; however, no services are available. Reported depths of 15 feet through the entrance and 10 feet at the floats are available. West Basin has wet winter storage, and East Basin has wet and dry winter storage.

(157) 
 Communications
(158) U.S. Highway 101 extends north and south from Astoria, and U.S. Highway 30 extends inland to Portland, OR. Astoria is served by a Class I railroad. The Clatsop County Airport, south of Youngs Bay, is served by a charter airline that handles passengers and freight.

(159) Tongue Point at Mile 16 (18) on the Oregon side, is a bold, rocky peninsula, 308 feet high, covered with trees and connected with the south bank by a low, narrow neck; it projects into the river for 0.8 mile. A buoy depot of the Coast Guard is on the west side of the peninsula near its inner end. On the east side are the concrete piers of the former naval base.

(160) Cathlamet Bay is east of Tongue Point and south of the main ship channel. The bay is subject to frequent change with shifting shoals and channels. There are many islands which are covered with tule in the summer, but in the winter they are almost indiscernible. Protected anchorage for small craft can be found in the area between Mott Island and Lois Island in 12 to 17 feet. A submerged obstruction with a least depth of 5 feet is close to the middle of this area in about 46°11'24"N., 123°44'18"W. The John Day Channel extends between Tongue Point and John Day Point. At the junction with the John Day River just north of the point, the name changes to South Channel which follows the shore closely to and around Settler Point to Svensen; these channels are marked by lights and daybeacons. A railroad swing bridge crosses John Day River near the mouth and has a reported clearance of 8 feet. (See 33 CFR 117.1 through 117.59 and 117.881 chapter 2, for drawbridge regulations.) Several power cables cross the river and have a least clearance of 30 feet at mean lower low water. Many houseboats are moored along John Day River. The east part of Cathlamet Bay (chart 18523) is used mostly for logging operations and log storage.

(161) Grays Bay on the Washington side extends from Grays Point to Harrington Point north of the Main Ship Channel. Extensive mud flats are in the northeast section of the bay and are subject to frequent change. A dangerous submerged rock is off Rocky Point in 46°17'15"N., 123°43'40"W. Deep River flows into the north part of the bay. The channel is marked and follows the shore from Grays Point around Portuguese Point and Rocky Point. This river is used only by small pleasure craft and sport fishermen and for logging operations. Depths of about 6 feet are available for about 2 miles above the mouth, above which it is shoal and probably good for no more than 2 feet.

(162) Grays River entered just east of Deep River, is another small stream used only by pleasure craft. Depths are not more than 2 feet, and much of the stream is blocked by snags and sunken logs.

(163) 
 Chart 18523

(164) Between Harrington Point Mile 20.5 (23.6), and Crims Island Mile 47.5 (54.6), Columbia River main channel follows the north bank to Three Tree Point thence swings around the bend, holding to the northeast shore as far as Hunting Islands where it swings along the south shore until off the southeast end of Puget Island; thence it follows the north bank from Cape Horn past Abernathy Point and north of Crims Island and Gull Island.

(165) 
 Currents
(166) In this section the current velocity is about 1 knot. Because of the river flow, which combines with the current, the upstream flow is weak or nonexistent and the downstream flow attains velocities of 2 to 3 knots.

(167) 
 Local magnetic disturbance
(168) Differences of as much as 3° from the normal variation have been observed along this section of the river.

(169) Steamboat Slough northeast of Price Island at Mile 29.3 (33.7) on the Washington side, and Elochoman Slough on the east side of Hunting Islands at Mile 31.3 (36), are used by fishing boats, tugs, and for log storage. Gasoline and diesel fuel are available at Skamokawa just above the northwest end of Steamboat Slough. A small marine railway, owned by a private packing firm, can be used if prior arrangements are made. In 2000, the controlling depth was 1 foot along the southeast edge of the entrance channel (shoaling to bare across the remainder of the entrance) and in the channel bend off Skamokawa.

(170) At Mile 35 (39.9), a power cable with a least clearance of 230 feet crosses the main channel to Puget Island. The tower on the east side of the channel on Puget Island is prominent.

(171) Cathlamet Channel joins the main channel at Mile 32.3 (37.2) on the Washington side. It is used by fishing boats, tugs, log rafts, and barges, and for some log storage above the city of Cathlamet. A mooring basin is at Cathlamet with its entrance on Elochoman Slough; 190 berths (some with electricity), gasoline, diesel fuel, water, ice, wet and dry winter boat storage, a pumpout station, a launching ramp, and marine supplies are available. A fixed highway bridge crosses the channel from Cathlamet to Puget Island; the clearance is 75 feet for the north span. A power cable, 0.5 mile above the bridge, has a clearance of 310 feet.

(172) Three wharves, owned and operated by Fort James, are at Wauna on the Oregon side at Mile 36.2 (41.7). The wharves are in line and together provide a total of 3,000 feet of continuous berthing space. Depths alongside are 20 to 50 feet and deck heights are 11 to 15 feet. A clamshell bucket unloads wood chips into a receiving hopper served by a conveyor system. Wood chips, sawdust, and fuel oil are received, and paper products are shipped.

(173) Westport Slough at Mile 37.4 (43) on the Oregon side, leads to a ferry dock at the village of Westport. A lumbermill wharf, in ruins, is just east of the ferry slip. In 1989-2009, the midchannel depth was 4 feet to the ferry dock. The ferry operates between Westport and the ferry landing 0.5 mile north of Pancake Point on Puget Island, and carries passengers and automobiles. Above Westport the slough was used for log storage; decaying and submerged piling may present hazards to vessels operating close to shore. About 7 feet can be carried to Kerry 2.4 miles above the mouth. Overhead power cables 0.8 and 1 mile above the mouth of the slough have clearances of 74 and 76 feet, respectively.

(174) Wallace Slough at Mile 41 (47) south of Wallace Island, is used by fishing boats and house floats. A depth of 4 to 5 feet can be carried through the slough.

(175) Beaver Slough enters Wallace Slough near the southeast end of Wallace Island. The slough is used by fishing boats and house floats. A fixed bridge with a 30–foot span and clearance of 8 feet crosses the west arm of the slough near its mouth. An overhead power cable with a clearance of 68 feet crosses the slough about 2 miles above the mouth.

(176) Clatskanie River is a tributary of Beaver Slough. A railroad swing bridge, about 0.6 mile above the mouth, has a clearance of 16 feet through the east draw. (See 33 CFR 117.1 through 117.59 and 117.865 chapter 2, for drawbridge regulations.) There is a wharf at Clatskanie. Gasoline, diesel fuel, and water are available in cans from the town; mariners supplies, ice, and a launching ramp are also available. Several sawmills once operated along the river. Logs were stored throughout the area, and remnants of piling and related structures may present hazards close to shore. In 1998, depths of about 2 feet could be carried through Beaver Slough to the mouth of Clatskanie River; thence 2 feet could be carried in the river to the town of Clatskanie; local knowledge is advised. Numerous shoals and snags have been reported in Beaver Slough and Clatskanie River.

(177) Port Westward a former Army ammunition terminal, is the site of a general cargo terminal. The main wharf, just west of the entrance to Bradbury Slough, is 1,200 feet long, has 40 feet reported alongside and a deck height of 20 feet, and can be used for shipment and receipt of general cargo.

(178) Bradbury Slough at Mile 46.6 (53.6) southwest of Crims Island, has depths of 9 feet as far as the upper end where it shoals to 3 feet. There once was extensive log storage along the Crims Island shore. Remnants of pilings and log storage related structures may present hazards close to shore.

(179) 
 Chart 18524

(180) Between Crims Island and Saint Helens, Mile 75 (86), the main channel starts its southeast swing, passing south of Fisher Island and Hump Island and north of Walker Islandand Lord Island; thence, under the Longview fixed bridge, thence west of Cottonwood Island east of Sandy Island and west of Martin Island and Burke Island. Numerous jetties along this stretch are usually marked by lights or daybeacons.

(181) 
 Currents
(182) In this section, the average velocity on the ebb is 2.0 knots. Flood currents can be experienced at low river levels after spring freshet and until the fall rainy season.

(183) 
 Local magnetic disturbance
(184) Differences of as much as 8° from the normal variation have been observed along this section of the Columbia River.

(185) Coal Creek Slough at Mile 48.9 (56.3) on the Washington side, empties into the river at Stella. The slough is used for moorage of small craft. It was also used for log storage, and piling and related structures present hazards close to shore. Power cables over the deeper part of the slough have a least clearance of 65 feet.

(186) Fisher Island Slough north of Fisher Island, is used as the Longview Yacht Basin, by small fishing vessels, and as log-storage grounds. A depth of 7 feet may be carried through the channel. Remnants of log storage grounds may still be found throughout the transit.

(187) Power cables over the main channel at Mile 54.2 (62.4), at Lord Island, have a least clearance of 216 feet.

(188) The channel between Walker Island and the Oregon shore is used for log-raft storage. The power cables south of Lord Island have a least clearance of 115 feet.

(189) The Lewis and Clark Bridge at Mile 57.3 (66.0) between Longview and Rainier, has a fixed span with a clearance of 187 feet. The bridge piers are marked by buoys.

(190) Longview at Mile 57.3 (66) on the Washington side is a major river port. Papermills, lumbermills, and an aluminum plant are in the city. Waterborne commerce includes lumber and wood products, flour, alumina and aluminum ingots, and general cargo.

(191) 
 Prominent features
(192) The Lewis and Clark Bridge with its high towers is easily the most prominent feature in approaching Longview from either up or down the river. Upon closer approach, the many stacks and tanks of the mills can be identified; most are charted.

(193) 
 Anchorages
(194) Deep-draft vessels may anchor northwest of Lewis and Clark Bridge adjacent to the main ship channel (Slaughters Channel); depths in this anchorage are 30 to 41 feet. A secondary anchorage, southeast of the bridge and just south of the main ship channel, may also be used. Depths in this anchorage are 35 to 40 feet off Rainier and 18 to 35 feet opposite Cottonwood Island. Care should be exercised not to obstruct the dredged channels. (See 33 CFR 110.1 and 110.228 chapter 2, for limits and regulations.)

(195) 
 Currents
(196) Average current velocity, on the ebb, at Longview is 2.0 knots.

(197) Pilotage, Longview
(198) See Pilotage, Columbia River and Bar, indexed as such, early this chapter.

(199) 
 Towage
(200) Tugs to 3,600 hp are available at Longview.

(201) 
 Quarantine, customs, immigration and agricultural quarantine
(202) Longview is a customs port of entry. (See Vessel Arrival Inspections, chapter 3.)

(203) Quarantine is enforced in accordance with regulations of the U.S. Public Health Service. (See Public Health Service, chapter 1.)

(204) 
 Harbor regulations
(205) The Port of Longview is a municipal corporation governed by a board of commissioners and administered by a port manager.

(206) 
 Wharves
(207) The deep-draft facilities at Longview include six berths owned and operated by the Port of Longview, and the privately owned and operated facilities of two large paper companies and an aluminum plant. Only the deep-draft facilities are listed in the table. Depths alongside the port-owned wharves are reported to be maintained at 40 feet; for information on the latest depths contact the port authorities or private operators. All the facilities described have direct highway connections and plant trackage with direct railroad connections. The port-owned properties have a total covered storage area of 1 million square feet and open storage area of 75 acres. Water and electrical shore power connections are available at the port wharves and some of the private facilities. Special handling equipment, if available, is mentioned under Mechanical Handling Facilities in the table.


(209) The Weyerhaeuser facilities (Table Ref. Nos. 2-4) northwest of the Lewis and Clark Bridge are reached by a side channel. The channel is marked by a 115° private lighted range.

(210) 
 Supplies
(211) Provisions and some marine supplies and services are available. Fuel oil and water are available at the wharves.

(212) 
 Repairs
(213) There are no facilities for major repairs to large oceangoing vessels in Longview; the nearest such facilities are in Portland. Some above-the-waterline repairs can be made, and there are several machine shops in the city. The Port of Longview has cranes to 65-ton capacity which can be used to lift private craft if prior arrangements are made.

(214) 
 Communications
(215) Longview is served by Interstate Highway 5 and U.S. Highway 30, and by three transcontinental railroads.

(216) Cowlitz River flows into Columbia River at Mile 59 (68), just east of Longview. The mouth of the river is heavily silted as a result of the volcanic eruptions of Mount Saint Helens in 1980. Large amounts of mud, logs, and other debris entered Columbia River from Cowlitz River. In 1980, dredging was done in the area but the Federal project is no longer maintained by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. Mariners are advised to use extreme caution and seek local knowledge prior to entering Cowlitz River. The tide varies from 4 feet at the mouth to zero at Ostrander 7.8 miles above the mouth. At Kelso a stage of 20 feet is reached during ordinary freshets and a stage of 25 feet at extreme floods.

(217) Five fixed bridges and several overhead power/television cables cross the river between the mouth and Ostrander; least clearances for the bridges are 10 feet and for the cables are 67 feet. A bascule bridge, 1.4 miles above the mouth of the river, has a clearance of 25 feet. (See 33 CFR 117.1 through 117.59 and 117.1037 chapter 2, for drawbridge regulations.)

(218) At Kelso there are several private wharves including a sand and gravel wharf, a public landing, and several small craft floats, at one of which gasoline is available.

(219) Rainier is on the Oregon side opposite Longview. The town of Rainier operates a small-craft basin; berths, gasoline, water, ice, a launching ramp, a pumpout station, wet winter boat storage, and marine supplies are available. Diesel fuel may be obtained at the tugboat moorage just east of the city basin.

(220) Carrolls Channel between Cottonwood Island and the Washington shore of Columbia River, is used for log storage and fishing boats.

(221) Two State fish hatcheries are on Kalama River at Mile 63.5 (73.1). Kalama on the E bank about 3 (3.5) miles above Cottonwood Island, is the site of two lumber mills.


(223) A marina and mooring basin are at Kalama. Berths with electricity, gasoline, diesel fuel, water, a launching ramp, a pumpout station, and wet and dry winter boat storage are available at the marina.

(224) The channel circling the west side of Sandy Island is used by tugs hauling log rafts and barges.

(225) Martin Slough between Martin Island and Burke Island and the Washington shore, formerly a booming and log storage area, as was Burke Slough between Burke Island and the Washington shore. Mariners are cautioned that submerged piling and hazardous structures may exist throughout the area close to shore.

(226) Columbia City is a municipality at Mile 73 (84) on the Oregon side. The main channel follows along the waterfront.

(227) At the south end of Deer Island Slough about 1.5 miles north of Columbia City, is the pier of a chemical plant.

(228) Saint Helens at Mile 75 (86) opposite the mouth of Lewis River, is the site of a pulp and paper mill.

(229) Berths with electricity, gasoline, water, ice, and some marine supplies are available at the marina at Saint Helens. Engine repairs can be made. There are a large number of houseboats and boathouses in the vicinity of the marina. A launching ramp and wet winter boat storage are available at the marina.

(230) A dredged channel, marked by private daybeacons, leads to a marina in Scappoose Bay SW of Saint Helens. The marina is owned by the Port of Saint Helens and can provide berths with electricity, gasoline, water, ice, marine supplies, a launching ramp and wet winter storage.

(231) Lewis River enters Columbia River at Austin Point Mile 75.7 (87.0), on the Washington side. Depths are about 3 feet over the mouth, but just below the first bridge a bar reduces the depth to less than 1 foot. Some recreational traffic moves up to Woodland 5.7 miles above the mouth, at high water. The railroad swing bridge 1.8 miles above the mouth remains in the closed position and has a clearance of 28 feet. (See 33 CFR 117.1053 chapter 2, for drawbridge regulations.) The other bridges, all fixed, have clearances of 34 feet or more.

(232) From Saint Helens, Columbia River follows a south course to the mouth of the Willamette River, Mile 88 (101.2), and then turns southeast to Vancouver, Mile 92 (106).

(233) 
 Chart 18525

(234) Multnomah Channel is a 19-mile waterway separated from the Columbia River near Saint Helens and from the Willamette River near Portland by Sauvie Island. A power cable about midway through the channel has a clearance of 100 feet. A fixed highway bridge, near the south end, has a clearance of 77 feet. There are several full service marinas and yacht clubs along the channel. Covered berths, electricity, gasoline, diesel fuel, water, ice, marine supplies, launching ramps, and pump-out stations are available. Hull, engine, and electronic repairs can be made and an 80-ton marine lift and 60-ton marine railway are available. There are several houseboats along the channel, and most of the channel south of Coon Island is designated a no wake zone.

(235) Warrior Rock the point on the east side of Warrior Point at the north end of Sauvie Island, is marked by a light. In thick fog vessels seldom attempt to pass the light; they anchor either above or below the point until the weather clears.

(236) 
 Local magnetic disturbance
(237) Differences of as much as 6° from the normal variation have been reported between Warrior Rock and Duck Club Light 6 off Duck Club 1.5 miles south.

(238) Lake River the outlet for Vancouver Lake flows north for 9.5 miles to its junction with Columbia River at the north end of Bachelor Island Mile 76 (88). The reported controlling depth was 6 feet in 1973 to the small-craft harbor at Ridgefield 2.5 miles above the mouth. A marina is at Ridgefield; berths, water, ice, a launching ramp, and some marine supplies are available. The town of Ridgefield operates a public small-craft dock and launching ramp just south of the marina. Wet winter boat storage is at the marina.

(239) A marina, in the channel behind the elongated island west of Shillapoo Lake, has berths, with electricity, gasoline, water, ice, a launching ramp, and marine supplies. A 2½-ton hoist is available for launching small craft. Reported depths of 5 feet can be carried through the channel and to the river north of the marina, however, the channel south of the marina is closed by shoals.

(240) 
 Charts 18526, 18527

(241) At Mile 88 (101.2), Columbia River is joined by Willamette River its largest tributary below the Cascade Mountains. The Willamette drains a large territory and is important as the site of the city of Portland, 9 (10.4) miles above its mouth.



(244) The Federal project depth in Willamette River is 40 feet to the Broadway Bridge in Portland, thence, maintained by the Port of Portland, 30 feet between Broadway Bridge and Ross Island. (See Notice to Mariners and latest editions of charts for controlling depths on the Willamette River to the Broadway Bridge.) Additional information can be obtained from the Corps of Engineers, Portland, OR. (See Appendix A for address.) Contact the Port of Portland for the controlling depths of the section of the channel maintained by the port.

(245) (See 33 CFR 162.225 chapter 2, for navigation regulations on Willamette River.)

(246) From the entrance of the Willamette River to the Willamette Falls Locks at Oregon City, overhead clearances and depths are at Columbia River Datum. Above the Willamette Falls Locks depths of the Willamette River are at Willamette River Datum and clearances are at the datum of Newburg Pool.

(247) Kelley Point Junction Light (45°39'11"N., 122°45'46"W.), 39 feet above the water, is shown from a pile structure with a red and green triangular daymark on the end of the dike extending from Kelley Point on the east side of the entrance to the river.

(248) Columbia Slough a narrow back channel roughly parallel to Columbia River, empties into the Willamette about 0.4 (0.5) mile above its mouth. Least depth in the slough is usually less than 2 feet. A dam has been constructed across the slough about 7.3 miles above the mouth.

(249) The fixed bridges over the slough have a least clearance of 15 feet. The least clearance of the overhead power and telephone cables is 42 feet.

(250) In the vicinity of Post Office Bar Range 2 (2.4) miles above the mouth of Willamette River, deep-draft vessels favor the west side of the river, while smaller vessels and tows usually hug the east side because of lesser current. Overhead power cables with a least clearance of 230 feet cross the river 0.3 mile above the junction with Multnomah Channel. The twin towers supporting the cables are the most conspicuous features in this area.

(251) Portland on Willamette River about 9 (10.4) miles from its mouth, is the principal city of the Columbia River system and one of the major ports on the Pacific coast. The port has several deep-draft piers and wharves on both sides of the Willamette River between its junction with the Columbia and Ross Island. In addition there are extensive facilities for small vessels and barges south of Hawthorne Bridge and at North Portland Harbor, south of Hayden Island. It has extensive commerce, both foreign and domestic, and is the port of call for many lines of coastwise, intercoastal, and transpacific vessels.

(252) The Port of Portland created by the State in 1891, is controlled by a Port Commission and administered by an executive director. The port owns several marine terminals, Port of Portland Ship Repair Yard, and dredges the channel between Broadway and Ross Island Bridges; it also assists the Corps of Engineers with other dredging in the Willamette and Columbia Rivers. The port also operates an international airport and three general aviation airports. A 30-inch hydraulic pipeline dredge is owned by the port. In addition to dredging the port waterfront and river channel, the port conducts hydrographic surveys periodically along all port-owned piers and wharves.

(253) 
 Anchorages
(254) The anchorage areas that are generally used in the Columbia River are Kelley Point Anchorage, east of Kelley Point and on the southwest side of Vancouver Lower Channel and Hayden Island Anchorage, between the north end of Hayden Island and Vancouver Range (See 33 CFR 110.1 and 110.228 chapter 2, for limits and regulations.) Hayden Island anchorage has two anchor buoys for use by bulk carriers/large vessels. In 2004, an anchor was reported to have been lost in Hayden Island Anchorage in about 45°38'32"N., 122°44'01"W.

(255) A special anchorage in the Columbia River is between Tri-Club Island (Sand Island) and Lemon Island about 6.5 miles above the railroad bridge. (See 33 CFR 110.1 and 110.128 chapter 2, for limits and regulations.)

(256) 
 Regulated navigation areas
(257) Regulated navigation areas have been established in the waters of the Willamette River along both sides of the river. These areas encompass sediment caps which have been placed over contaminated soil on the river bed. Anchoring, dredging or trawling in these areas is prohibited. See 33 CFR 165.1 through 165.13 165.1322 165.1323 165.1326 and 165.1337 chapter 2, for limits and regulations.

(257.01) Caution
(257.02) There are several cable and pipeline areas along the length of the Willamette River, the bulk of them being between Mile 2.6, near Multnomah Channel, through Mile 16.6, near the Sellwood Bridge. These areas are typically concentrated around bridge crossings, however, there are a few exceptions. A large cable and pipeline area, the northern limit of which is at Mile 11.4, extends southward to Mile 13.7, near the Ross Island Bridge. Not all submarine pipelines and cables are required to be buried, and those that were originally buried may have become exposed. Mariners are urged to use extreme caution in these areas. If anchorage is necessary, it is requested that vessel operators contact the Port of Portland before anchoring or performing construction activities.

(258) 
 Weather, Portland and vicinity
(259) The coast range provides limited shielding from the maritime influence of the Pacific Ocean. The Cascade Range provides a steep high slope for the lifting moisture-laden westerly winds which produces heavy rainfall in the western Cascade piedmont region. They also form the barrier for the Columbia River basin region and dry continental air masses. Airflow is usually northwest in Portland in spring and summer and southeast in fall and winter, interrupted occasionally by outbreaks of dry continental air east through Cascade passes and across ridge tops. When such an outbreak occurs, extreme high or low temperatures are usually experienced in the Portland area.

(260) Portland has a very definite winter rainfall climate. About 88 percent of the annual total occurs in October through May, nine percent in June and September, while only 3 percent comes in July and August. The average annual precipitation is 37.33 inches (948.2 mm). December is the wettest month and July, the driest. Precipitation is mostly rain; on the average only 17 days each year have snow. Snowfall is seldom more than a couple of inches, and it generally lasts only a few days. The annual average is only seven inches (178 mm) with January having the most. Snowfall has fallen in every month from November through May. The greatest measured snowfall in 24-hours was just under 11 inches (279 mm) recorded in January 1971.

(261) Each season is clearly marked. Winter is mild, cloudy, and wet with southeast surface winds predominating. Summer is marked by mild temperature, with prevailing northwest winds and very little precipitation. Fall and spring are transitional in nature, with frequent periods of ground fog. An average of 18 days during October record foggy conditions while only three days during July can expect fog. At all times, incursions of marine-tempered air are a frequent moderating influence. Outbreaks of continental air from east of the Cascade Mountains flow through the Columbia Gorge at near sea level and spread into the Portland area associated with the movement of Pacific storms offshore on a northeast storm track. In winter this brings the coldest weather and the extremes of low temperature are registered in the cold airmass. Freezing rain and ice glaze often are transitional effects. In summer the hot, dry, continental air brings the highest temperatures. Extreme temperatures below zero are very infrequent. The absolute lowest ever reached is 3°F below zero (-19.4°C) recorded in February 1950. Extreme temperatures above 100°F (37.8°C) have occurred during each month from May through September; the absolute highest temperature is 107°F (41.6°C) recorded in July 1942, July 1965 and August 1981. Temperatures 90°F (32.2°C) or higher are reached every year, but seldom persist for more than 2 or 3 days before the warm spell is broken by a flow of cool, moist air from the ocean. The average annual temperature for Portland is 53.9°F (12.1°C). The average maximum is 63°F (17.2°C) while the average minimum is 45°F (7.2°C).

(262) Destructive storms are infrequent in the Portland area. Surface winds seldom exceed gale force. Thunderstorms are infrequent occurring, on average, only seven days each year. Tornadoes with the funnel cloud reaching the ground are rare and there are rare occurrences of heavy rain even though winter rains may persist for days at a time.

(263) Ice forms occasionally, but it is seldom heavy enough to affect navigation seriously, although navigation by small craft may be difficult.

(264) (See Appendix B for Portland climatological table.)

(265) Pilotage, Portland
(266) See Pilotage, Columbia River and Bar, indexed as such, earlier this chapter.

(267) 
 Towage
(268) Dock assist tugs to 3,600 hp are available in Portland. No lighterage is necessary, but occasionally lumber is transferred by barge from lumbermills to vessels.

(269) 
 Quarantine, customs, immigration and agricultural quarantine
(270) Portland is a customs port of entry. (See Vessel Arrival Inspections, chapter 3.)

(271) Quarantine is enforced in accordance with regulations of the U.S. Public Health Service. (See Public Health Service, chapter 1.)

(272) 
 Coast Guard
(273) A marine safety unit and station are located in the Swan Island Industrial Park at Portland. (See Appendix A for address.)

(274) 
 Harbor regulations
(275) The regulations are enforced by the City of Portland harbormaster and Multnomah County Sheriff River Patrol; copies of the regulations (Title 19) may be obtained on the Internet at portlandoregon.gov or, for a nominal fee, by contacting the City Auditors Office at 1221 SW 4th Avenue, Room 140, Portland, OR 97204. The harbormaster may be contacted by phone 503–823–3767 or by writing Portland Fire Bureau, Attn: Harbormaster, 55 SW Ash Street, Portland, OR 97204.

(276) 
 Wharves
(277) The Port of Portland operates several modern marine terminals. In addition to the port-owned piers and wharves there are many privately owned deepwater facilities and many barge wharves in the harbor. Only the deep-draft facilities are listed in the facilities table. The alongside depths are reported depths. (For information on the latest depths contact the port authorities or the private operators.) All the Port of Portland operated facilities have rail trackage, water, and electrical shore power connections, as well as many of the privately operated facilities. All wharves have highway connections. Floating and shore-based mobile cranes of up to 65-ton capacity are available, but most general cargo is handled by ship's tackle. Special handling equipment, if available, is mentioned under Mechanical Handling Facilities in the table.


(279) 
 Supplies
(280) Marine supplies of all kinds are available in Portland. Bunker fuel, diesel oil, and lubricants are available. Most large vessels are bunkered at their berths by barge. Water is available at most of the berths.

(281) 
 Repairs
(282) Portland is a major ship repair center on the Pacific coast. The Port of Portland, Swan Island Ship Repair Yard, on Swan Island on the east side of Willamette River, is the major repair facility at the Port of Portland. There are three floating drydocks here with a maximum lift capacity of 87,000 tons. Complete repair facilities and services are available at the yard, including construction, conversion and above and below waterline repairs. The yard has over 9,500 feet of ship repair berths to a maximum alongside draft of 40 feet (depending on river stage). There is a 157,050-barrel ballast treatment plant for the offloading of oily slops.

(283) Several firms are available for undertaking outfitting and repair work. Marine railways with hauling capacities to 1,000 tons and cranes to 70 tons are available for full repairs and to any type of vessel.

(284) 
 Communications
(285) Portland is served by several major railroads and airlines. Portland International Airport is about 2 miles north of the city. Many barge lines provide service up the Columbia River to Richland, WA., 214 (246) miles from Portland; barge service is also available on the Willamette River to Salem, OR, 73.6 (84.7) miles above the mouth, and on the Snake River to Lewiston, ID, 324 (373) miles from Portland.

(286) 
 Small-craft facilities
(287) Most of the small-craft facilities, including practically all of the moorage, is in North Portland Harbor and along the south bank of the Columbia River between Interstate 5 highway bridge and the west end of Government Island. Complete facilities are available. Berths with electricity, gasoline, diesel fuel, water, ice, marine supplies, launching ramps, pumpout stations, and wet and dry winter boat storage can be obtained at many marinas. Hull, engine, and electronic repairs can be made. Drydocks to 70 tons, 55 feet long, and 16 feet wide are available in North Portland Harbor.

(288) 
 Chart 18528

(289) Navigation of Willamette River above Portland is hazardous due to the rocks, shoaling bars, and strong currents. Local knowledge and midchannel courses are recommended. Present chart coverage extends only to Newberg, 43.4 (50) miles above the mouth. Many of the daybeacons in the Willamette River are seasonal. The navigational aids above Newberg are not maintained. Navigation should be with local knowledge only. The Portland Coast Guard should be contacted for the latest information concerning navigation of Willamette River above Salem.

(290) Below the falls at Oregon City, ordinary fluctuation of stage of water is 15 feet and extreme fluctuation due to flood conditions is 30 to 50 feet. Above Oregon City, ordinary fluctuation is 12 to 20 feet and extreme is 20 to 27 feet.

(291) Depths and clearances of bridges and cables are at Columbia River Datum below the Willamette Falls Locks. Above the Willamette Falls Locks depths of the Willamette River are at Willamette River Datum and clearances are at the datum of Newberg Pool.

(292) The minimum clearances of the overhead power cables crossing the river from Portland to Newberg are: 77 feet to Willamette Falls Canal; 72 feet over Willamette Falls Canal; and 75 feet to Newberg.

(293) Between Portland and Willamette Falls most of the terminals are privately owned mill wharves and oil-receiving facilities. Above the falls are small privately owned wharves or natural landings.

(294) A public launching ramp is on the west side of the river at a park about 13.5 (15.7) miles above the entrance.

(295) Sellwood fixed highway bridge, 14.5 (16.7) miles above the mouth, is under construction (2011). Consult Local Notice to Mariners or USCG for latest conditions. A public mooring is on the east side of the river at a park just north of the bridge. A repair facility is directly across the river from the park; gasoline, water, and a launching ramp are available. A lift to 7 tons are available for all types of repairs to light- draft boats.

(296) A launching ramp is at Milwaukie 16.2 (18.6) miles above the mouth. Minor engine and hull repairs can be made on light-draft boats. Dry winter boat storage is available.

(297) A fixed railroad bridge, 17.4 (20) miles above the mouth, has a clearance of 74 feet.

(298) A wharf on the west bank of the river, 0.3 (0.3) mile above the railroad bridge, has 840 feet of berthing space with a depth of 16 feet alongside; the deck is 30 feet high and marked by private lights. Electric belt conveyors serve barge-loading spouts and a 15-acre open storage area in the rear. The wharf ships wood chips by barge and is owned by the Port of Portland and operated by James River Corporation.

(299) The channel passes east of Hog (Rocky) Island 1.6 (1.8) miles above the railroad bridge. Copeleys Rock 150 yards east of the south end of the island, is covered 10 feet and should be avoided.

(300) Oregon City on the east bank 22.6 (26) miles above the mouth, is connected with West Linn by two fixed highway bridges; one, about 0.2 (0.2) mile below the Willamette Falls canal locks, has a vertical clearance of 74 feet. The second, 0.6 (0.7) miles below the north end of the locks, has a clearance of 76 feet.

(301) A marina, on the east bank just above the lower highway bridge, has about 350 berths, electricity, gasoline, water, ice, provisions, wet winter storage, a launching ramp, and marine supplies. Engine repairs can be made.

(302) A large papermill is on each bank of the river at Willamette Falls Canal.

(303) Willamette Falls Canal on the west bank 22.8 (26.2) miles above the mouth, has four locks with a total lift of 50 feet; usable lock dimensions are 175 feet long, 37 feet wide, and 5 feet deep over the miter sills at low water. A bascule highway bridge across the canal has a vertical clearance of 27 feet closed. The least clearance of the power cables and pipeline that cross the canal is 67 feet. (See 33 CFR 207.680 chapter 2, for regulations concerning administration and navigation of the canal and locks.) Upbound vessels may expect a delay at the approach to the locks and through the locks during weekdays because of the downbound traffic from the papermills. The lock is equipped with a radiotelephone. The lockmaster can be contacted on VHF-FM channel 14; call sign WUJ–363.

(304) A warehouse and other buildings of a papermill are on the west bank alongside the canal locks. An 850-foot timber wharf is on the east side of the canal.

(305) From the entrance to Tualatin River 24.8 (28.5) miles above the mouth, for over 4 miles, Willamette River is shallow and winding; buoys and unlighted ranges mark the channel.

(306) Walnut Eddy is on the east bank 29.4 (33.8) miles above the mouth.

(307) 
 Cable ferry
(308) The Canby ferry crosses the river about 1.1 (1.3) miles above Walnut Eddy. The ferry carries passengers and vehicles, and operates from 0645 to 2115 daily except during periods of high water. When the ferry is underway, the cable is suspended below the water surface at varying depths. When the ferry is docked, the cable is dropped to the bottom. DO NOT ATTEMPT TO PASS A MOVING CABLE FERRY.

(309) Near Wilsonville 33.7 (38.8) miles above the mouth, there are twin fixed highway bridges and a fixed railroad bridge, with clearances of 74 feet and 76 feet, respectively. A marina, on the south bank under the railroad bridge, has about 115 berths, with electricity, gasoline, water, ice, and marine supplies. The marina has a launching ramp and can make hull and engine repairs. Marine towing service for small craft is also available at this marina.

(310) A quarry is on the north side of the river about 300 yards west of the railroad bridge. Mariners are advised to exercise caution because barges and tugs may be operating in the area.

(311) Near Butteville 37.3 (43.0) miles above the mouth, there is a small-craft marina with about 35 berths, electricity, gasoline, water, ice, a launching ramp, and some marine supplies available. Minor engine repairs can be made. The fixed highway bridge, 42.1 (48.4) miles above the mouth, has a clearance of 68 feet at the main span. At Newberg 43.4 (50.0) miles above the mouth, there is a fixed highway bridge with a clearance of 88 feet. An overhead power cable with a clearance of 55 feet, crosses the river 44.9 (51.7) miles above the mouth.

(312) From Newberg to Corvallis, Willamette River is more tortuous and turning, and can be difficult for the small craft; the stretch contains numerous gravel bars, pools and snags. Mariners should exercise due caution for shallow water transits. The tributary Yamhill Riverempties into Willamette River about 3 miles above Newberg. Depths in Yamhill River of about 3 feet are reported to Dayton, 4 miles above its mouth.

(313) 
 Cable ferry
(314) The Wheatland ferry crosses Willamette River about 63 (72.5) miles above the mouth. The ferry carries passengers and vehicles, and operates between 0530 and 2145 daily except when the river level exceeds 16 feet. Warning signs and warning lights mark the crossing. The ferry is guided by two cables. The upper cable, 80 feet above the river level, controls the ferry during normal conditions. The low water cable, near the bottom at all times, controls the ferry when the river level drops below 12 feet. The low water cable is dropped to the bottom when the ferry is not operating. DO NOT ATTEMPT TO PASS A MOVING CABLE FERRY.

(315) Salem capital of the State of Oregon, is 74.4 (85.6) miles above the mouth. Several moorings and floats for log-rafts and small craft are here; berths, gasoline, diesel fuel, water, ice, launching ramps, and marine supplies are available at several small marinas. Hull engine, and electronic repairs can be made in Salem.

(316) A power cable at the north city limits of Salem has a clearance of 86 feet. Minimum clearance of the bridges is 64 feet at the fixed highway bridges, and 42 feet down and 87 feet up at the railroad lift bridge. The railroad lift bridge is maintained in the closed position. (See 33 CFR 117.897 chapter 2, for bridge regulations.)

(317) At Independence 83 (95.5) miles above the mouth, there is a small-craft launching ramp, but no facilities.

(318) The town of Buena Vista is 92 (106) miles above the mouth of the river.

(319) 
 Cable ferry
(320) A cable ferry crosses the river near Buena Vista. The self-propelled ferry carries passengers and vehicles, and operates from 0700 to 1700 (Wednesday-Friday), 0900 to 1900 (Saturday and Sunday), and is closed Monday and Tuesday. The ferry is seasonal and operates between April and October. Both when the ferry is underway and when docked the guide cables are suspended approximately 80 feet above the water. When underway, the ferry shows the required navigation lights. DO NOT ATTEMPT TO PASS A MOVING CABLE FERRY.

(321) The river is crossed at Albany 104 (119.8) miles above the mouth, by three bridges: a railroad swing bridge with a clearance of 40 feet, a fixed highway bridge with a clearance of 55 feet, and a fixed highway bridge with a clearance of 60 feet in the center of the north span and 58 feet in the center of the south span. The railroad swing bridge is maintained in the closed position. (See 33 CFR 117.1 through 117.59 and 117.897 chapter 2, for drawbridge regulations.)

(322) Corvallis 114.6 (131.9) miles above the mouth, is the limit of the Federal project of the river. Navigation above Corvallis is dangerous and should not be attempted.

(323) There are small-craft finger piers, ramps, and marginal facilities at Corvallis; gasoline and water are available. A highway bridge has a swing span with a clearance of 35 feet. (See 33 CFR 117.1 through 117.59 and 117.897 chapter 2, for drawbridge regulations.)

(324) 
 Chart 18526

(325) The main channel of the Columbia River favors the Washington shore, north of Hayden Island and Tomahawk Island from Mathews Point to Ryan Point. Overhead clearances are at Columbia River Datum. Overhead power cables with a least clearance of 220 feet cross at Mile 90.6 (104.2). The Burlington Northern Railroad swing bridge at Mile 91.8 (105.7) has a clearance of 39 feet. The bridgetender monitors VHF-FM channels 13 and 16 and works on channel 13 (call sign KQ-9049.) The interstate 5 highway bridge at Mile 92.5 (106.5) has twin spans that cross three separate channels. The clearances are: lift spans across the Tomahawk Bar Channel, 39 feet down and 178 feet up; fixed spans across the barge channel, 46 feet (58 feet at the center); fixed spans across the alternate barge channel, 72 feet. The bridgetender monitors VHF-FM channels 13 and 16 and works on channel 13; call sign, KBM Interstate. (See 33 CFR 117.1 through 117.59 and 117.869 chapter 2, for drawbridge regulations.)

(326) North Portland Harbor is that portion of the river channel between the Oregon shore and Hayden Island. The lower or west entrance is at Mile 89.0 (102.5); the upper or east entrance is at Mile 94.5 (108.8).

(327) A Federal project provides for a 40-foot turning basin at the west entrance to North Portland Harbor, a 40-foot channel for about 1.3 miles above the west entrance, and thence a 20-foot channel to the project limit about 2 miles farther upstream. The Federal project for the east entrance to North Portland Harbor provides for a channel 10 feet deep from the main channel in Columbia River southwest to just south of the east end of Tomahawk Island. A 238.4° lighted range marks the east entrance channel for about 0.6 mile from the junction with Columbia River. Two bridges cross North Portland Harbor. The railroad bridge, 2.6 miles east of the west entrance, has a swing span with a clearance of 39 feet. (See 33 CFR 117.1 through 117.59 and 117.887 chapter 2, for drawbridge regulations.) A fixed highway bridge (Interstate 5) about 0.8 mile east has a clearance of 35 feet.

(328) Vancouver is on the Washington side of the Columbia River at Mile 92 (106). The port is a water outlet for a large lumber-producing section in southwest Washington, as well as a distributing point for a fair share of the grain produced in the interior of Washington and Oregon. Bulk bentonite clay, paper, petroleum products, fertilizer, and general merchandise are also shipped. Steel, wood products, chemicals, and automobiles are the major imported items at Vancouver.

(329) The Port of Vancouver is controlled by a board of three commissioners and a general manager.

(330) 
 Anchorages
(331) Anchorages for Vancouver are the same as those used for Portland. (Refer to that section under the discussion of the Port of Portland.)

(332) Pilotage, Vancouver
(333) See Pilotage, Columbia River and Bar, indexed as such, earlier this chapter.

(334) 
 Towage
(335) Tugs to 3,600 hp are available at Vancouver.

(336) 
 Quarantine, customs, immigration and agricultural quarantine
(337) Quarantine is enforced in accordance with regulations of the U.S. Public Health Service. (See Public Health Service, chapter 1.)

(338) 
 Wharves
(339) The Port of Vancouver owns and operates three deep-draft terminals; a grain wharf and oil dock, owned by the port, are managed by private companies. There are several private facilities which, with two exceptions, handle barge traffic only. Only the deep-draft facilities are listed. The alongside depths given in the table are reported—for information on the latest depths contact the port authorities or the private operators. Most of the piers and wharves have shore connections (electrical/water). All the facilities described have direct highway connections and plant trackage with direct railroad connections.


(341) 
 Supplies
(342) Complete marine supplies and services are available from Portland. Fuel oil must be delivered by barge. Small-craft supplies are available in North Portland Harbor and at other places on the Columbia River east of Vancouver.

(343) 
 Repairs
(344) Complete repairs for large and small vessels are available at Portland. Vancouver has no facilities for repair work on large oceangoing vessels. Small-craft repairs on craft up to 70 tons or 55 feet can be made in North Portland Harbor; there are no repair facilities on the north side of the river at Vancouver.

(345) 
 Communications
(346) Vancouver is served by Interstate Highway 5 and by several State routes. Three major railroads have connections to the city. Portland International Airport is on the south side of the river about 3.5 miles east-southeast of Vancouver.

(347) 
 Chart 18531

(348) From Vancouver to Bonneville, Mile 126 (145), Columbia River passes through the impressive Columbia River Gorge flanked on each side by railroads and highways. Commerce on the river in this section consists mostly of pleasure craft and barges.

(349) There are more than 35 dike dolphins along this portion, some are marked with lights at their ends. All the dikes are completely covered at higher stages, but bare about 6 feet at datum level.

(350) Ryan Point 1.4 miles east-southeast of the Interstate 5 highway bridge, is the site of a former shipyard and is now an industrial park. A public launching ramp is at the park.

(351) There are many full service marinas, yacht clubs, and moored houseboats along the Oregon shore from Interstate 5 highway bridge to the west end of Government Island.

(352) At Mile 97.9 (112.7), the river is crossed by a fixed highway bridge with a clearance of 136 feet (144 feet for the center 300 feet) over the channel.

(353) 
 Anchorage
(354) A special anchorage is between Tri-Club Island ( Sand Island) and Lemon Island the west end of Government Island. (See 33 CFR 110.1 and 110.128 chapter 2, for limits and regulations.)

(355) Camas at Mile 104.3 (120.0) on the Washington side, has a large papermill which maintains its own wharf on Camas Slough north of Lady Island. About 8 feet can be taken from the Columbia River through the west entrance to the papermill wharf near the east end of the slough; the channel is marked by a light, buoys and a lighted range. The east entrance to the slough is foul and bares at low water. Most of the traffic in the slough is for the papermill, which barges its products to Portland for reshipment. At high flood stages a current of as much as 5 knots prevails in the slough.

(356) Two fixed highway bridges cross Camas Slough from the mainland to Lady Island; the west one has a clearance of 69 feet, and the east one has a clearance of 37 feet.

(357) A marina at mile 105.7 (121.6) just east of Camas, has about 250 berths, open and covered and with electricity, gasoline, water, a launching ramp, and complete marine supplies. A marine sales and repair facility adjacent to the marina has a 12-ton hoist that can handle craft to 42 feet for hull and engine repairs. A sawmill is just east of the marina.

(358) There are five power cables crossing at Ione Reef south of Lady Island. The least clearance is 133 feet.

(359) The entrance to Sandy River. on the Oregon side opposite Camas, bares at low water. At higher flood stages, passage up Sandy River as far as Troutdale is possible.

(360) 
 Local magnetic disturbance
(361) Differences of as much as 8° from the normal variation have been observed between Tunnel Point and Point Vancouver east of Reed Island.

(362) 
 Dangers
(363) In this section of the river, the principal hazards to navigation are the strong currents, rocks and rocky banks, winds, and an accumulation of ice.

(364) 
 Currents
(365) In general, currents run fair with the main channels with considerable intensity, increasing in regions upstream toward Bonneville. Exceptions are the turn in the channel at Washougal Light 50, where a northwest set prevails; southwest of Cape Horn where a west set is experienced; and the region between Fashion Reef and Multnomah Falls, where a south set is experienced.

(366) Weather, Corbett
(367) Between Corbett Mile 110.3 (127), and The Dalles, Mile 165 (189.8), the river flows between the bold mountains of the Cascade Range. In this stretch, winds of considerable force prevail during much of the time; generally they blow upstream in summer and downstream in winter. Daily peak velocities vary from 6 to 42 knots, but Corps of Engineers officials at Bonneville Dam measured gusts as high as 76 knots during 1960-62.

(368) Near Warrendale Mile 123 (141.5), the river becomes very constricted within less than a mile and continues so almost to the approach to the locks of Bonneville Dam, at the lower end of Bradford Island.

(369) Beacon Rock 840 feet high and 300 yards inshore, is on the Washington side opposite Warrendale. It is a prominent dark gray rock outcropping of volcanic origin. A State park of the same name surrounds the rock. The park maintains a mooring float just inside the entrance to the channel west of Pierce Island; moorage is restricted to pleasure boats and to periods not to exceed 5 nights. Water, electricity, and pump-out facility are available at the park.

(370) Bonneville on the Oregon side at Mile 126 (145), is the headquarters of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers in charge of the Bonneville Lock and Dam.

(371) Bonneville Lock and Dam 126.3 (145.3) miles above the mouth of the Columbia River, is in four parts. Powerhouse No. 2 is between the Washington shore and Cascade Island; the spillway is between Cascade Island and Bradford Island; Powerhouse No. 1 and the old lock are between Bradford Island and Robins Island; and the new lock is between Robins Island and the Oregon shore. The new navigation lock has a vertical lift of about 59 feet, a width of 86 feet and a length of 675 feet. Overhead power cables over the lock have a clearance of 210 feet. The old lock has been placed in mothball status. Restricted areas are above and below the spillway and powerhouse. (See 33 CFR 207.718 chapter 2, for information concerning use, administration, and navigation of Bonneville Lock and Dam.)

(372) The strong current toward the powerhouse makes it difficult to approach Bonneville Lock from upstream, particularly if the lock is approached at an angle and if a turn is to be executed in time to avoid an accident. Therefore, all craft approaching the lock from the east and pushing one or more barges should steer as close to the Oregon mainland shore as safety will permit, should be in line with the lock upon reaching the east end of the guide wall, and should continue at a steady but reduced speed if the lock is prepared for entrance and the signal for entrance has been given.

(373) From Bonneville to The Dalles, the channel is through the pool created by Bonneville Dam, which extends 40 (46) miles to The Dalles Dam. Depths and overhead clearances are at normal pool level.

(374) Although there is deep water in much of the pool, the controlling depth to The Dalles Dam navigation lock is about 20 feet. The channels are marked by aids to navigation.

(375) An overhead power cable with a clearance of 190 feet crosses the river 1 (1.1) mile above the dam.

(376) Tugs use the dolphins on the south side of the river 1.2 (1.5) miles above the lock for mooring and shifting barges and log rafts. Small craft can find refuge in the mouth of Eagle Creek 0.6 (0.7) miles above the lock, if the creek is not in flood.

(377) 
 Currents
(378) From the lock at Bonneville through Cascade Rapids, constant piloting is necessary because of the strong currents. From Cascade Rapids east, a set of 1° to 3° may be experienced depending on the angle that the course makes with the general direction of the river, the strength of the current, and the direction and strength of the wind.

(379) 
 Local magnetic disturbance
(380) Differences of as much as 6° from normal variation have been observed along this section of Columbia River.

(381) 
 Chart 18532

(382) Bridge of the Gods 2.6 (2.8) miles above the Bonneville Dam, has a fixed span with a clearance of 135 feet over a middle width of 284 feet.

(383) Cascade Locks 3 (3.3) miles above the Bonneville Dam, have been drowned out. At normal stages of pool level the sides of the old chamber of the lock bare about 3 feet. A strong current flows through the lock. A marina, just east of the lock, has berths, gasoline, and a launching ramp.

(384) Along this section are several inlets or rivers, generally used for log storage, where small craft may find refuge. Most are behind fixed bridges. These places, and their distances above the Bonneville Dam are:

(385) Rock Creek at Stevenson WA, 4.2 (4.8) miles; the bridge clearance is 19 feet. Government Cove on the Oregon side, 5.6 (6.4) miles. Wind River at Home Valley WA, 8.1 (9.3) miles; the minimum bridge clearance is 26 feet. Drano Lake near Cook WA, 14.5 (16.7) miles; the bridge clearance is 15 feet. Ruthton OR, 17.8 (20.4) miles. White Salmon River at Underwood WA, 20.9 (24) miles; the bridge clearance is 26 feet.

(386) Rock Creek, Wind River, and Drano Lake have log rafts and booms used by nearby sawmills.

(387) Hood River OR, 21.7 (25) miles above the Bonneville Dam, is a town at the junction of Columbia and Hood Rivers. There are two boat basins at Hood River; the west basin is privately owned and is used by a repair yard for building and repairing steel barges and tugs. The east basin, operated by the Port of Hood River Commission, has about 55 berths; gasoline and water are available. A large shoal area extends northwest from the east basin around the mouth of the Hood River to about 0.2 mile north of the west basin.

(388) The highway bridge over Columbia River just above the small-craft basin has a lift span with a clearance of 67 feet down and 148 feet up. Bridge openings can be made by contacting 541–386–3500, a minimum of 12 hours in advance of the requested opening. (See 33 CFR 117.1 through 117.59 and 117.869 chapter 2, for drawbridge regulations.)

(389) There are power cables with clearance of 155 feet over the river at Stanley Rock 22.9 (26.4) miles above Bonneville Dam, and at Crates Point 13 (15) miles above Stanley Rock.

(390) At Bingen on the Washington side 23 (26.4) miles above the Bonneville Dam, there are two barge basins with adjacent sawmills. A light and a daybeacon mark the entrance to the east basin, which has a launching ramp and about 20 berths for small craft. In 1976, the controlling depth was 7 feet at midchannel in the entrance to the east basin with 5 to 10 feet in the basin, except for shoaling along the edges. The entrance to the west basin is unmarked; reported depths of 10 feet are in this basin.

(391) The Dalles on the Oregon side of Columbia River, 39 (44.8) miles above the Bonneville Dam. River traffic, between the town and Vancouver, consists mainly of petroleum products and general freight bound upstream, and wheat, wool, and rafted logs bound downstream.

(392) A small-boat mooring basin with a breakwater and sheer boom protection is just east of the city wharf. Depths inside are 4 to 8 feet. The basin has a small-craft launching ramp. Gasoline, ice, and marine supplies are available. Engine repairs can be made.

(393) The city wharf is over 1,000 feet long and has two warehouses; depths alongside are about 20 feet. A dock marked by private aids is close west of the wharf. There are also private facilities for handling petroleum products, bulk grain and fresh fruit.

(394) 
 Charts 18533, 18535

(395) The Dalles Lock and Dam 40 (46) miles above Bonneville Dam, has a single lift lock with a vertical lift of about 87.5 feet. Restricted areas are above and below the dam. (See 33 CFR 207.718 chapter 2, for information concerning use, administration and navigation of The Dalles Lock and Dam.) Lake Celilo the pool created by The Dalles Dam, provides slack water navigation with a controlling depth of about 14 feet for 22 (25.3) miles upstream to the John Day Dam. Depths and overhead clearances are at normal pool level.

(396) Traffic above The Dalles Dam consists mostly of grain and petroleum products.

(397) 
 Ice
(398) Ice occasionally interferes with navigation for 2 weeks or more, usually in January or February.

(399) A fixed highway bridge across the downstream approach to the lock at The Dalles Dam has a clearance of 100 feet.

(400) A railroad bridge, 7 (8.1) miles above The Dalles Dam, has a lift span with clearance of 20 feet down and 79 feet up. The bridgetender monitors VHF-FM channel 16 and works on channel 13; call sign KQ-9048. (See 33 CFR 117.1 through 117.59 and 117.869 chapter 2, for drawbridge regulations.)

(401) The Celilo Park basin 7.7 (8.9) miles above The Dalles Dam, offers shelter to small boats, but there are no facilities except a launching ramp. The entrance to the basin is marked by a light.

(402) At Miller Island 10.5 (12) miles above The Dalles Dam, the north and south channels are marked by ranges. The main channel is along the north side of the island; however it is reported that the south channel is more frequently used. In 1994, submerged obstructions with depths of 1 to 3 feet were reported in the south channel in about 45°38'17"N., 120°54'56"W. and 45°38'14"N., 120°54'54.5"W.

(403) On the Oregon side just south of Miller Island is Deschutes River crossed by a highway bridge with clearance of 20 feet. Small craft occasionally seek shelter here during unfavorable weather. A highway and a railroad bridge close south have a clearance of 17 feet.

(404) A grain elevator with a barge loading chute extending to the river is at Biggs OR.

(405) The Biggs Bridge 13.6 (17) miles above The Dalles Dam, has a clearance of 88 feet at the center of the fixed highway span. The bridge joins Maryhill WA, and Biggs Junction OR.

(406) 
 Charts 18535, 18536, 18537, 18539

(407) John Day Dam 188 (216.3) miles above the mouth of the Columbia and 21 miles above The Dalles Dam, has a single lift lock with a vertical lift of about 105 feet. Restricted areas are above and below the dam. (See 33 CFR 207.718 chapter 2, for information concerning use, administration and navigation of John Day Dam.) Depths and overhead clearances are at normal pool level.

(408) The rock awash near the east approach to John Day Locks in 45°43'25"N., 120°41'20"W. is marked by a light and sign; mariners are urged to exercise caution when passing north of Lake Umatilla Lighted Buoy 2, so as to avoid being carried to the northwest and striking the rock awash.

(409) Lake Umatilla the pool created by John Day Dam, extends 65 (75) miles to McNary Dam. Depths are generally great, but there are many shoals. The winding channel through the lake has a controlling depth of about 19 feet and is marked by aids to navigation. The chart is the best guide. An overhead power cable with a clearance of 95 feet is about 41 (47.2) miles above John Day Dam.

(410) John Day River is 2.3 miles above John Day Dam on the south side of the Columbia. Just south of the highway bridges over the entrance to the river is the John Day River Recreation Area . There are floats here for about 40 craft and a launching ramp. The fixed highway bridges have a clearance of 19 feet.

(411) A grain elevator with barge-loading facilities is at Arlington OR, 21.5 (24.7) miles above John Day Dam. A loading tower for the elevator is marked by a light. Small-craft moorage and a launching ramp are available at Arlington.

(412) At Boardman 45.6 (52.5) miles above the John Day Dam, there is a small-craft basin protected by a stone breakwater and a jetty. Berths and a launching ramp are available here.

(413) There are two woodchip docks, a general cargo dock, and a grain elevator dock at a port about 1.2 miles northeast of the small-craft basin at Boardman.

(414) A grain elevator dock and barge loading pier is on the Oregon side of the river, about 3 miles northwest of Irrigon, OR.

(415) Umatilla is on the Oregon side 62 (71.3) miles above the John Day Dam.

(416) There is a small-craft basin about 500 yards west of the highway bridge. The east side of the entrance is marked by a light. About 125 covered and uncovered berths, electricity, gasoline, diesel fuel, water and ice are available. A concrete launching ramp is at the basin.

(417) The fixed parallel highway bridges across the river, 63 (72.5) miles above the John Day Dam near Umatilla, have two navigational spans with a least clearance of 71 feet. The north openings are generally used during high water because there is less current; during low water it is unsafe. The power cables east of the fixed parallel highway bridges have a least clearance of 82 feet.

(418) 
 Charts 18541, 18542, 18543

(419) McNary Lock and Dam 254 .5 (292.9) miles above the mouth of the Columbia River and just above Umatilla, has a single lift lock with a vertical lift of about 75 feet. A restricted area is above the dam. (See 33 CFR 207.718 chapter 2, for information concerning use, administration, and navigation of McNary Lock and Dam.) Depths and overhead clearances are at normal pool level.

(420) Lake Wallula the pool created by McNary Dam, provides slack-water navigation from McNary Dam to the junction with the Yakima River a distance of about 37(43) miles. Depths in the lake are generally deep, however, there are several isolated shallow spots and rocky areas along the length of the lake. The channel through the lake is marked by aids to navigation from the Walla Walla River to Richland, 40 (46) miles above McNary Dam.

(421) The Port of Umatilla on the Oregon side, about 0.4 mile above the McNary Lock and Dam, owns a 230-foot port wharf with 800 feet of berthing space; reported depths of 20 feet are available alongside; a private company operates the wharf. A grain elevator, owned and operated by Pendleton Grain growers, Inc., has a loading rate of 20,000 bushels per hour; the grain elevator is just east of the port wharf. A barge wharf, used for receipt and shipment of petroleum products and liquid fertilizer, is just east of the grain elevator; the oil wharf is owned and operated by the Tidewater Barge Lines.

(422) Hat Rock State Parkon the south side about 5.5 (6.3) miles above McNary Dam, has a public launching ramp and offers gasoline and excellent protection for small craft.

(423) Port Kelley on the east side of Columbia River, 16 (19.5) miles above McNary Dam, has a large grain elevator and facilities for handling bulk grain by rail, truck or water. The elevator loading rate is 30,000 bushels per hour. Unlighted ranges lead clear of the rock and shoal area in the middle ground 0.4 mile west of the facility.

(424) A small boat moorage is in the bight just northeast of Port Kelley. Berths, electricity, gasoline and water are available.

(425) Walla Walla River enters Columbia River on the east side 18.4 (21.2) miles above McNary Dam. There is a public launching ramp on the south side of the river just east of the highway bridges at the entrance.

(426) A grain wharf, at Wallula Junction just south of the Walla Walla River, has a grain elevator and barge loading spout with a loading rate of 20,000 bushels per hour; a reported depth of 20 feet is alongside the wharf. The wharf is owned and operated by Walla Walla Grain Growers, Incorporated. A barge wharf, at the Port of Walla Walla just south of Attalia is owned and operated by Boise Cascade Corporation. The wharf ships wood pulp and receives caustic soda. A reported depth of 12 feet is alongside.

(427) About 1.9 miles south of the Snake River mouth, on the west side of Lake Wallula, is the Unocal Corporation chemical plant; anhydrous ammonia and urea are received here by barge. The dock has 480 feet of berthing space and has a reported depth of 30 feet alongside. Two white ammonia storage tanks at this plant are prominent.

(428) The Union Pacific Railroad bridge crossing Columbia River, 27 (31) miles above McNary Dam, has a vertical lift span with a clearance of 11 feet down and 72 feet up. A racon is at the center of the bridge span. The bridgetender monitors VHF-FM channel 16 and works on channel 13; call sign KTD-561. (See 33 CFR 117.1 through 117.59 and 117.1035 chapter 2, for drawbridge regulations.)

(429) 
 Charts 18545, 18546, 18547, 18548

(430) Snake River 283 (325.2) miles above the mouth of Columbia River, rises in Yellowstone National Park, from which it winds south past the Grand Tetons, and thence for some 868 miles to its junction with the Columbia at Pasco, WA.

(431) From that junction for 119 (137) miles to Lewiston, ID there are few small-craft facilities. There are several marinas along the river at Clarkston WA and Lewiston ID where berths, gasoline, diesel fuel, water, ice and marine supplies may be obtained. The Ports of Clarkston and Lewiston at the confluence of the Snake and Clearwater Rivers are the primary ports along the Snake River and serve the inland agricultural and logging communities of Washington, Idaho and Oregon. Barge loading facilities and grain terminals are available at both ports.

(432) Near its mouth, at the village of Burbank Snake River is crossed by the Burlington Northern Railroad lift bridge with a clearance of 14 feet down and 60 feet up. The bridgetender monitors VHF-FM channel 16 and works on channel 13; call sign KQ- 9047. About 0.6 (0.7) mile above the railroad bridge, there are dual spans of a fixed highway bridge with a least clearance of 61 feet. Numerous overhead cables with a reported minimum clearance of 43 feet cross Snake River between the fixed highway bridge and Ice Harbor Lock and Dam.

(433) East Pasco on the north side of Snake River 1 mile above the mouth, has privately owned facilities for receipt and shipment of petroleum products and liquid fertilizer. Burbank, on the south side of the river has two grain facilities owned by the Port of Walla Walla and operated by private companies. From East Pasco to Lewiston there are several facilities used for shipment of grain and wood chips. Other facilities along the river specialize in the receipt and shipment of logs, general cargo, petroleum products, anhydrous ammonia and liquid fertilizer.

(434) Ice Harbor Lock and Dam 8.4 (9.7) miles above the mouth of the Snake River, has a single lift lock with a vertical lift of about 100 feet. A restricted area is above and below the dam; the area is marked by buoys above the dam. (See 33 CFR 207.718 chapter 2, for information concerning use, administration, and navigation of Ice Harbor Lock and Dam.) Lake Sacajawea the lake formed by the waters behind Ice Harbor Dam, provides depths at slack water of 10 feet or more for a distance of 27.8 (32) miles to Lower Monumental Dam.

(435) Lower Monumental Lock and Dam 27.6 (31.8) miles above Ice Harbor Dam and about 36 (41.5) miles above the mouth of the Snake River, has a single lift lock with a vertical lift of about 100 feet. A restricted area is above and below the dam; the area is marked by buoys above the dam. (See 33 CFR 207.718 chapter 2, for information concerning use, administration and navigation of Lower Monumental Lock and Dam.)

(436) The Snake River between Lower Monumental Dam and Little Goose Dam, 25 (28.8) miles above Lower Monumental Dam, is crossed by three fixed bridges with a least clearance of 52 feet; overhead power cables crossing the river between the two dams have a least clearance of 90 feet.

(437) Little Goose Lock and Dam about 25 (28.8) miles above Lower Monumental Dam and about 61.1 (70.3) miles above the mouth of the Snake River, has a single lift lock with a vertical lift of about 98 feet. A restricted area is above and below the dam; the area is marked by buoys above the dam. (See 33 CFR 207.718 chapter 2, for information concerning use, administration, and navigation of Little Goose Lock and Dam.)

(438) Lake Bryan the pool formed by Little Goose Dam is crossed by a fixed highway bridge with a clearance of 60 feet about 10.7 (12.3) miles above the dam. Overhead power cables with a least clearance of 80 feet cross the lake between Little Goose Dam and Lower Granite Dam.

(439) Lower Granite Lock and Dam about 31.5 (36.8) miles above Little Goose Dam and about 93.4 (107.5) miles above the mouth of the Snake River, has a single lift navigation lock 675 feet long and 86 feet wide. The dam, completed in 1975, permits navigation to Lewiston ID, 120 (138) miles above the mouth of the Snake River. A restricted area is above and below the dam; the area is marked by buoys above the dam. (See 33 CFR 207.718 chapter 2, for information concerning use, administration and navigation of Lower Granite Lock and Dam.)

(440) A fixed highway bridge with a clearance of 60 feet crosses Snake River about 1.5 miles below its junction with Clearwater River. A highway lift bridge with clearances of 7 feet down and 60 feet up crosses Clearwater River about 0.35 mile above the junction with Snake River (See 33 CFR 117.1 through 117.59 and 117.381 chapter 2, for lift bridge regulations.) A fixed highway bridge, about 1.15 miles above the lift bridge, has a clearance of 21 feet. A vertical lift highway bridge with a clearance of 10 feet down and 42 feet up crosses the Snake River between Lewiston, ID and Clarkston WA. (See 33 CFR 117.1 through 117.59 and 117.385 chapter 2, for drawbridge regulations.) A fixed highway bridge with a clearance of 60 feet is about 1.5 miles above the lift bridge. Overhead power cables with a minimum clearance of 80 feet cross the river between the dam and Lewiston.

(441) 
 Charts 18542, 18543

(442) Pasco on the north side of the Columbia River 286 (329) miles above its mouth, is 32 (36.8) miles above McNary Dam. The Port of Pasco Marine Terminal Wharf (46°13'10"N., 119°05'52"W.), operated by Continental Grain Company, has reported depths of 16 to 20 feet alongside with a total berthing space of 970 feet. A grain elevator, with a capacity for 450,000 bushels, serves the wharf and can load barges at a rate of 15,000 bushels per hour. The port also owns a Container Terminal Wharf at the barge slip in about 46°12'50"N., 119°04'14"W. The wharf is used for receipt and shipment of containerized general cargo and has a total berthing space of 840 feet; depths alongside the wharf are reported to be 20 feet. The Port of Pasco is a municipal corporation consisting of a Board of Commissioners and a General Manager. In addition to the marine terminals, the port operates an airport. The Pasco-Kennewick-Richland area is the most important commercial barging center above Portland.

(443) The Pasco Yacht Basin, on the east side just below the railroad lift bridge, has berths, gasoline, diesel fuel and marine supplies; engine and electronic repairs can be made. An 8-ton hoist and a launching ramp are available at the basin.

(444) Kennewick on the south side of Columbia River opposite Pasco, has a grain elevator dock with 500 feet of berthing space and a reported depth of 14 feet alongside. At Clover Island there is a large small-craft harbor. About 80 berths with electricity, gasoline, diesel fuel, water and marine supplies are available; hull, engine and electronic repairs can be made. A 12-ton crane is at a marina occupying the center section of the island. A private yacht club is on the south side of the island.

(445) A railroad lift bridge crosses the Columbia River between Pasco and Kennewick, about 0.4 mile below Clover Island, and has a clearance of 18 feet down and 70 feet up. (See 33 CFR 117.1 through 117.59 and 117.1035 chapter 2, for drawbridge regulations.) The fixed highway bridge just southeast of Clover Island has a clearance of 56 feet and another fixed bridge, 0.9 mile above Clover Island, has a clearance of 61 feet. Interstate Route 182 fixed bridge crosses the Columbia River at Richland and has a clearance of 73 feet. Overhead cables cross the Columbia River just above the junction with Snake River and at the east end of Clover Island; clearances are 85 and 54 feet, respectively.

(446) Columbia Park Recreation Area just above the upper fixed highway bridge at Pasco, has a small-craft marina at which berths, electricity, gasoline, water, a launching ramp and marine supplies are available. Engine repairs can be made. Diesel fuel is available in the town of Richland just above the recreation area.

(447) The Hanford Works a huge U.S. Department of Energy reservation, is on the south and west sides of the Columbia River about 13 (15) miles above Richland. The facility is devoted to energy research, development and demonstration; production of nuclear materials; management of defense nuclear waste; and commercial nuclear fuel cycle research. The original site was created in 1943 under the direction of the Manhattan District of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers for the production of materials for nuclear weapons such as those which helped to end World War II.

(448) Priest Rapids Dam 68 (78.3) miles above McNary Dam and 353 (407) miles above the mouth of Columbia River, completed and dedicated in 1962, is the head of navigation, although in its construction provision was made for later building of a navigational lock if needed. However, Richland is the present practical head of navigation.

(449) 
 Charts 18551, 18553

(450) Franklin D. Roosevelt Lake WA, is a National Recreation Area on the upper Columbia River impounded by the Grand Coulee Dam (47°57.5'N., 118°59.0'W.). Information about facilities and services is available at the recreation area headquarters in the town of Coulee Dam, the visitors’ center at Fort Spokane, and the ranger station at Kettle Falls.

(451) A restricted area has been established in the discharge channel of the Grand Coulee Dam, and extending about 2.5 miles downstream from the dam. (See 33 CFR 162.230 chapter 2, for limits and regulations.)

(452) 
 Chart 18554

(453) Lake Pend Oreille (48°10'N., 116°25'W.), Idaho, is a recreation area nearly surrounded by the Kaniksu National Forest. The charted depths are based on a lake level of 2048.15 feet above mean sea level. Normal winter and summer lake levels are about 3 feet and 14 feet above the charted depths, respectively. Lake level information, corrected daily, can be obtained by calling the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Albeni Falls Dam, telephone (208–437–3133).

(454) Marina services at Sandpoint on the north side of the Pend Oreille River at its junction with Lake Pend Oreille, include berthing, gasoline, a launching ramp, winter storage, hull and engine repairs. The drawspan of the railroad bridge across the Pend Oreille River, at the river and lake junction, is in the permanently closed position. (See 33 CFR 117.1 through 117.59 and 117.383 chapter 2, for drawbridge regulations.) U.S. Route 95 fixed highway bridge crosses the river just above the railroad bridge; the least clearance for both bridges is 14 feet. At Bayview (47°59'N., 116°34'W.), at the southwest end of the lake just west of Scenic Bay, has several marinas that can provide transient berthing, gasoline, diesel fuel, launching ramps, winter storage, marine supplies, water and pump-out stations; complete marine services are available. Additional information about facilities and services may be obtained from the Sandpoint Chamber of Commerce, Sandpoint, ID 83864.