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Coast Pilot 9 - Chapter 5 - Edition 35, 2017


Kodiak Island


(1) This chapter describes Afognak and Kodiak Islands and the numerous smaller off-lying islands which surround their shores. Also described are the various passes and straits leading between these islands, the port of Kodiak and the numerous other fishing villages.

(2) Caution
(3) Certain areas of the marine environment along the northeast sides of Kodiak Island may contain munitions and explosives of concern (unexploded ordinance). These areas are within the dashed black lines shown on Chart 16580. Mariners are cautioned against anchoring, dredging or trawling within these areas.

(4) Chart 16580

(5) Kodiak Island and Afognak Island close together and separated from the mainland southwest of Cook Inlet by Shelikof Strait, are large and have numerous small islands along their shores. The group is about 54 by 155 miles in extent, with its greatest length in a southwest direction. The land is rugged and mountainous, with elevations of 2,000 to 3,000 feet along the shores and more than 4,500 feet in the interior. The rocky shores are indented by deep, narrow inlets.

(6) Kodiak, on Kodiak Island, is the principal business center in the area. Afognak Island, mostly timbered, is a government forest reserve. Some cattle and sheep are raised, and a few mineral prospects have been located. Salmon canneries operate during the fishing season. The crab, halibut and herring fisheries also are important; the halibut fleet operates on Albatross and Portlock Banks. The periods of good weather are longer on these islands than on the adjacent mainland, and considerable success has been attained in growing vegetables.

(7) Afognak Island is separated from Kodiak Island by Marmot Bay, Kupreanof Strait and the passages on either side of Whale Island. These waters provide a direct route from Kodiak Harbor to Shelikof Strait. Kodiak, on the northeast coast of Kodiak Island, lies behind the islands in the northwest part of Chiniak Bay; one approach is from the north, and the other is from the southeast through Chiniak Bay.

(8) The earthquake of December 1999 may have caused bottom uplift in and around all Kodiak Island coastal waters; shoaling and new dangers may exist requiring extreme caution until a complete survey is made of the entire area.

(9) Weather, Kodiak Island
(10) On Afognak Island the prevailing winds are northeast except in spring and again in late summer when they shift to southwest and west directions. At Kodiak, the winds, usually northwest in late fall, winter and spring, shift to the northeast in early summer and then to southeast until the end of September. The average wind speed is nine knots at Kodiak, and the area is subject to violent williwaws.

(11) Annual precipitation averages 65 inches (1651 mm) on Kodiak Island, and 53 inches (1346 mm) on Afognak Island. Annual snowfall averages 75 inches (1905 mm) at Kodiak, and measurable snow has been recorded in every month of the year except July and August.

(12) Mean annual temperature is 41 °F (5 °C) at Kodiak. Extreme temperatures noted were 86 °F (30 °C) in June (1953) and -16 °F (-26.7 °C) in January (1989). Water temperatures are about 1 °F (17.2 °C) lower than air temperatures in summer, and 1 ° and 2 °F (17.2 ° and 16.7 °C) higher in late fall, winter and early spring. Womens Bay, on the northeast coast of Kodiak Island, is frequently blocked by ice in midwinter.

(13) Fogs are common over the area and are most frequent at Kodiak in June and July. Cloudiness is considerable.

(14) Chart 16604

(15) Shuyak Island appears as part of the north end of Afognak Island but is separated from it by Shuyak Strait. The south portion is densely wooded, with the higher hills showing bare rocky outcrops. Proceeding north the trees gradually disappear and the north part is entirely grass covered.

(16) Stevenson Entrance the passage between the Barren Islands and Shuyak Island (see chapter 4), is navigable in clear weather. Kennedy Entrance, the passage north of the Barren Islands, is generally used if bound for Shelikof Strait from the east.

(17) Latax Rocks the northernmost feature of the Kodiak-Afognak-Shuyak group, are three rocky islets lying in line of the trend of the west coast of Shuyak Island. They are 32, 27 and 20 feet high, respectively, the outer one being the lowest and the most ragged. A rock, which uncovers 7 feet, is about 0.5 mile north of the outermost rock, and a reef, which uncovers 6 feet, is about 0.4 mile west of the outermost rock. Several detached shoals are in the vicinity of Latax Rocks. Ships using Stevenson Entrance should pass north of Latax Rocks. Latax Rocks Light (58°41'29"N., 152°29'01"W.), 40 feet above the water, is shown from a tower with a red and white diamond-shaped daymark on the north end of the northernmost rock.

(18) Current
(19) In the vicinity of Latax Rocks it has been noted that the current flows in a west direction on a rising tide and east on a falling tide with velocities reaching about 3 to 4 knots. The current appears to be less in the deeper water in the passage north of Latax Rocks. (See Chapter 4.)

(20) Tide rips in the vicinity of Latax Rocks are particularly heavy and should be avoided by small vessels. (See caution as to tide rips in the locality of the Barren Islands, Chapter 4.)

(21) Party Cape is the northwest end of Shuyak Island. It is 178 feet high and grass covered for 1 mile or more back.

(22) Dark Island between Party Cape and Latax Rocks, is about 0.8 mile in diameter, 115 feet high, and grass covered. Several large black rocks are off the southwest end of Dark Island. Starr Rocks which uncover 6 feet, are between Dark Island and the east part of Party Cape.

(23) Currents observed during one-half day in June on the southwest side of Dark Island set west on the flood with a velocity of 1.3 knots. The ebb velocity was 1 knot.

(24) The passage between Latax Rocks and Dark Island has a 5¼-fathom shoal near the middle where the currents and tide rips may appear heavier than elsewhere in the passage. The passage can be used by well-powered vessels by keeping 0.45 mile north of Dark Island on a due east or west course, with careful attention to the set from the strong currents.

(25) Dark Passage between Starr Rocks and Party Cape, may be navigated by keeping 0.4 mile off the cape and passing north of a rock 3 feet high lying 0.9 mile west-northwest of Party Cape. Because of the strong currents and heavy tide rips, the passage should be avoided.

(26) Shag Island and the west coast of Shuyak Island are described later in this chapter.

(27) The north coast of Shuyak Island from Party Cape to Point Banks is very irregular and fringed with numerous rocks and islets. Heavy currents and tide rips are found along this coast. Carry Inlet and Shangin Bay the main indentations, are narrow and tortuous. They may be used only by small craft with local knowledge. Carry Inlet has its entrance channel about 2 miles southeast of Party Cape. The narrowest part of Shangin Bay, 1.2 miles from its entrance, has a midchannel rock that is awash at minus tides.

(28) Perevalnie Islands 95 feet high and grass covered, are close to the north shore of Shuyak Island and 0.5 mile west of Point Banks. Perevalnie Passage between the islands and the mainland, may be used as a boat passage with a depth of about 5 feet.

(29) Temporary anchorage during south weather appears feasible 1 mile west-southwest of the west end of Perevalnie Islands.

(30) Point Banks an island about 0.4 mile long and 130 feet high, is entirely grass covered. The narrow passage between it and the northeast end of Shuyak Island has several rocks and is choked with kelp.

(31) Sentinel Island a rock 33 feet high 0.9 mile northwest of Point Banks, is a good landmark from the east or west. Its sides are nearly vertical.

(32) Fronting the east coast of Shuyak Island, 1.5 to 3.5 miles offshore, are a series of reefs and rocks separated by broken bottom areas and extending 7 miles in an approximately true south direction from a 2½-fathom reef, 1.4 miles southeast of Point Banks, to the vicinity of a bare rock 52 feet high. A similar series crosses the former in the latitude of Sea Otter Island.

(33) Routes
(34) Vessels using the passage along the east coast of Shuyak Island, inside the series of reefs and rocks, should proceed with caution. The bottom in this passage is extremely broken. The known dangers may be avoided by rounding the southeast end of Point Banks Island by 0.5 mile until the east end of the island bears true north. Then proceed 5.8 miles on course 175° until the prominent group of rocks, highest 15 feet, are a little less than 0.8 mile to the west, then steer 205° into Perenosa Bay. Tidal currents are very strong.

(35) The main approach from seaward to Andreon Bay, Shuyak Strait and Perenosa Bay is south of the rocks southeast of Sea Otter Island and between the 52-foot bare rock and Seal Islands, but its use by large vessels cannot be recommended. Indications of shoals along the approach are numerous and there are evidently pinnacle formations in this region. To avoid the known areas of extreme broken bottom, steer course 282° from seaward, pass 3.2 miles north of Tolstoi Point, then 1.9 miles south of the large rock, 52 feet high, lying southwest of Sea Otter Island, and then pass 1.5 miles north of the sharp black rocks north of Posliedni Cape.

(36) Sea Otter Island 7.5 miles southeast from Point Banks, is grass covered, 0.4 mile long and 105 feet high. Bare rocks and breakers extend to the east and southeast for 2.3 miles.

(37) Little Fort Island 85 feet high, off the east coast of Shuyak Island and 8 miles south of Point Banks, is grass covered and marks the entrance to Andreon Bay. Big Fort Island forms the south side of the bay. Big Fort Channel separates the island from the mainland. This channel bares at half tide. Anchorage for small boats may be had in Andreon Bay near the entrance to Big Fort Channel in 12 fathoms, muddy bottom. The axis of the entrance channel is a little less than one-third the way from the northeast end of Big Fort Island to Little Fort Island, then it follows the rounded north end of Big Fort Island about 350 to 400 yards offshore.

(38) Shuyak Strait has a navigable entrance at its west end and is described later in this chapter.

(39) Perenosa Bay on the north side of Afognak Island is between the east entrance to Shuyak Strait and Posliedni Point. The northwest part of the bay is foul. Anchorages may be found in several arms of Perenosa Bay, but the approach to the bay from seaward is characterized by a very broken bottom, as described above.

(40) Delphin Bay is the west one of the south arms of Perenosa Bay. The channel west of tree-covered Delphin Island is foul. Rocks are in the center of the passage east of the island, and the best water is 270 yards off the east points of Delphin Island. Boats can anchor in 16 fathoms, hard bottom, in the center of the head of the arm, after passing the island. A heavy swell comes into Delphin Bay in north weather.

(41) Discoverer Bay the southeast arm of Perenosa Bay, has excellent anchorage in 15 fathoms, muddy bottom, east of Discoverer Island which is tree covered and northernmost in the bay. A 3¾-fathom shoal is about 0.5 mile northwest from the east entrance point, and a 1-fathom spot is between the shoal and the point. Small boats can enter the channel on the west side of the island and go to the head of the arm. Two mooring buoys are in the southeast part of Discoverer Bay.

(42) Pilotage, Kodiak Island
(43) Pilotage, except for certain exempted vessels, is compulsory for all vessels navigating the waters of the State of Alaska.

(44) The Kodiak Island area is served by the Southwest Alaska Pilots Association. (See Pilotage, General (indexed), Chapter 3, for the pilot pickup stations and other details.)

(45) Vessels en route to Discoverer Bay can contact the pilot boat by calling “DISCOVERER BAY PILOT BOAT” on VHF-FM channel 16 or on a prearranged frequency between pilot and agent/vessel.

(46) Phoenix Bay the arm of Perenosa Bay just west of Posliedni Point, is a good anchorage for all weather except northwest; anchor in 10 to 17 fathoms, muddy bottom, 1.2 miles from the entrance. Shields Point forms the west entrance of the bay.

(47) Seal Bay in general, extends from Posliedni Point to Tolstoi Point. From a point 1.1 miles north from Posliedni Point a series of rocky islands and reefs extend in an east-southeast direction across Seal Bay. Navigation in this area should not be attempted without local information.

(48) Tonki Bay on the west side of Tonki Cape, has two arms separated by a headland. A 106-foot rocky islet is 0.5 mile north of the headland. Three rocks awash are about 0.3 mile from the east shore and 2 miles south of Tonki Cape. Anchorage is about 0.3 mile from the head of the east arm in 10 fathoms, soft bottom, but it is not secure with north winds. Small boats may anchor in the small cove on the east side of the head of the east arm in 8 fathoms, muddy bottom, in any weather.

(49) The west arm of Tonki Bay extends 6.5 miles south of the headland separating the two arms. Anchorage may be had in 18 fathoms, muddy bottom, about 0.3 mile from head of the arm.

(50) On the east part of Afognak Island is a series of mountain ridges with low depressions between them running through the island from north to south. From a distance Marmot Island appears as the easternmost of these ridges. The lower parts of Afognak Island are wooded, except its east coast and its southwest end south of Paramanof Bay.

(51) Caution
(52) In making Tonki Cape or Marmot Strait from the north, a very irregular set to the west has been experienced. In foggy weather a vessel is liable to be too close to the breakers off Sea Otter Island unless precautions are taken. Likewise in running to this locality from Seward, abnormal set has been experienced. From the experience of a survey vessel making these runs and in lying-to offshore, there seem to be two factors for which allowance should be made. First, if the run is made during the time of a flood spring tide, extra allowance should be made for set to the west. Second, if the course of the vessel passes over a bank or even a locality where the water is shoaled, extra allowance for a stronger current should be made.

(53) Tonki Cape the northeast end of Afognak Island, is a narrow grass-covered point 87 feet high near its north extremity. A low-lying gap connects it with the ridge separating Tonki Bay and Marmot Strait. A short reef extends north from the cape 0.3 mile, terminating in a rock awash at high water. It is recommended that vessels clear the north end of the cape by at least 1.5 miles. Tonki Cape Light (58°21'09"N., 151°59'12"W.), 75 feet above the water, is shown from a skeleton tower with a red and white diamond-shaped daymark.

(54) Sealion Rocks are two bare rocks close together, the larger about 35 feet high, about 5.5 miles east from Tonki Cape and 4 miles north from Marmot Island. A reef that uncovers 7 feet is 0.6 mile northeast from these rocks. Sealion Rocks have been used as a bombing target.

(55) Marmot Island about 6.5 miles long, parallels the east side of Afognak Island. Marmot Island is wooded to a height of about 500 feet. The north end is low and rises gradually to the highland. The east side and south end of the island are bluffs over 1,000 feet high in places. The west shore is also steep but lower. Three high rocks are close to Marmot Cape the south end of the island, and two more are close to its southeast side.

(56) The southeast shore of Marmot Island is a Steller sea lion rookery site. There is a 3-mile vessel exclusionary buffer zone around all but the northwest shore of the island. (See 50 CFR 224.103 Chapter 2, for limits and regulations.)

(57) Shoal areas adjacent to the northwest shore of Marmot Island extend north toward Sealion Rocks and border the north approach to Marmot Strait. A 4-fathom spot in this area is 2 miles off the north end of Marmot Island.

(58) The point on the northwest shore of Marmot Island, 1.5 miles from the north end, is marked by a rock, 12 feet high, 600 yards offshore.

(59) Two covered rocks, on which the sea generally breaks, are about 1 mile apart and 2.5 miles east of Cape St. Hermogenes the east end of Marmot Island. The north rock lies in the bearing 288° to the north end of the island. The south rock lies in the bearing 225° to the southeast end of the island. Two pinnacle rocks close to the southeast side of Marmot Island bear 232° when in range; the range passes southeast of both breakers. A vessel should pass over 2 miles outside the breakers to avoid broken bottom.

(60) Marmot Strait between Afognak and Marmot Islands, is 2.5 miles wide at its narrowest part. The strait is apparently free from dangers except along the shores. A shoal of 1¼ fathoms is 650 yards off the west shore of Marmot Strait, 6 miles from Tonki Cape. A midchannel course through the strait is recommended. Tidal currents have an estimated velocity of 1 to 3 knots, the flood setting north through the strait.

(61) King Cove 6 miles west of Marmot Cape, is an open bight 1.5 miles long, indenting the coast 1.8 miles. It may be used as a temporary anchorage in 7 to 12 fathoms, sand bottom. It is exposed to east and south weather.

(62) The west coast of Marmot Strait for about 5 miles south from Tonki Cape is broken and rocky, with reefs extending offshore. Along this stretch is a low bluff with a grass- and muskeg-covered plain, extending 0.3 mile inland to the main ridge, which rises abruptly. South to King Cove the bluffs increase in height with the shores steep-to. From King Cove to Pillar Cape the shoreline is a steep, bare bluff from 500 to 1,000 feet high.

(63) Charts 16594, 16576

(64) Marmot Bay extends west between Afognak and Kodiak Islands to Whale Island. In the center of the bay, near the entrance and north of The Triplets, in places the bottom rises abruptly from deep water to 14 to 17 fathoms. These areas should be avoided because there may be less water than indicated.

(65) The route from Marmot Strait to Kodiak is east of the broken bottom in the center of Marmot Bay entrance. However, shoal spots exist along this route east of Spruce Island and in the vicinity of Spruce Cape.

(66) The route in Marmot Bay from the vicinity of Marmot Strait to the passes at Whale Island lies between the general broken ground in the center of the bay and the north shore. Pillar Cape may be rounded at 1.5 miles in depths of 20 fathoms or more. Similar depths exist 0.8 mile off Cape Izhut. In the west end of Marmot Bay danger will be avoided by keeping well east of a line between the east end of Cape Kostromitinof and Stripe Rock and east of this line extended south until Hog Island is open from the northwest side of Whale Island.

(67) The route along the south side of Marmot Bay through Narrow Strait and Whale Passage is generally used by vessels from Kodiak bound for Shelikof Strait. Passage at the time of maximum current in Whale Passage should be avoided. Current predictions for Whale Passage may be obtained from the Tidal Current Tables.

(68) Pillar Cape the outer end of the north shore of Marmot Bay, is a bluff over 500 feet high, similar to the southeast side of Marmot Island. A high pinnacle rock is at the foot of the bluff, 0.5 mile east of the south end of the cape. About 1.5 miles west of the cape is an open bight from which lowland extends through to the west arm of Tonki Bay.

(69) Izhut Bay a north arm of Marmot Bay, is about 5 miles wide between Pillar Cape and Peril Cape and extends about 7.5 miles in a northwest direction. The only dangers are along the shores and in the arms of the bay. The bay proper is exposed to south weather, but some of the arms afford protected anchorages.

(70) The most important of these anchorages is Kitoi Bay an arm on the west side. Its head is a landlocked basin about 0.5 mile in diameter. The swinging radius from the center of the basin is about 300 yards. To enter Kitoi Bay pass the north entrance point of this arm slightly less than 0.5 mile off on a course 305° picking up the range defined by the prominent point on the north side about 1.8 miles in and the stream at the head of the small bight at the head of the arm. Continue on course or range until 0.3 mile from Midarm Island a small prominent midbay island, 50 feet high. This position is between another islet 600 yards to starboard and a 3-fathom spot 125 yards to port. The islet on the starboard beam is 100 yards from the north shore. The 3-fathom spot is marked by only a few streamers of kelp that are difficult to see. Then change course to pass south of the islet and steer midchannel course to the center of the basin, which is clear to within a few yards from shore. A low-water spit extends a few yards off the north entrance point of the basin. Anchor in 20 to 22 fathoms, good holding ground. Small vessels may anchor in a small bight southwest of the basin in 11 to 12 fathoms.

(71) Two fingerlike arms in the northeast part of Izhut Bay extend north about 5 miles. Saposa Bay the east arm, has an island about 0.5 mile from its entrance. A rock, covered ½ fathom, is about 125 yards south of the island. The passage is west of the island. The controlling depth is 2 fathoms. Small vessels may anchor above the island in 7 to 10 fathoms, sand bottom. The west arm is not recommended as an anchorage.

(72) Peril Cape the outer end of the west shore of Izhut Bay, is a prominent precipitous headland about 600 feet high with a high pinnacle rock close to its south side.

(73) Cape Izhut 2.5 miles southwest of Peril Cape, is a projecting, long, wooded, hilly point from 250 to 500 feet high. A rock, covered 7 fathoms, is south of Cape Izhut in 58°05'35"N., 152°20'06"W.

(74) Duck Bay is about 6 miles long from Cape Izhut to Cape Kostromitinof. At the east end of the bay temporary anchorage with a swinging radius of about 300 yards may be had in the middle of the cove 1.5 miles northwest of Cape Izhut, in 6 to 7 fathoms. The anchorage is east of an islet, 168 feet high, 0.3 mile from the north shore and should not be approached closely. Selezen Point forms the west side of the cove.

(75) A round, rocky island, 168 feet high and grass covered on top, is 2.5 miles west from Cape Izhut and 0.6 mile from shore. Kelp extends nearly 0.3 mile west and north of the island, and numerous bare rocks extend 0.5 mile east of the island and to the shore northeast of it. On Selezen Bay the cove north of the island, is the small native settlement of Little Afognak. Temporary anchorage may be had in the middle of the cove in 10 to 12 fathoms. Enter the cove west of the island between the island and a large rock awash at high water, which lies 0.3 mile south from the west point of the cove.

(76) Mary Anderson Cove the next cove west, with its entrance 1 mile northwest of the 168-foot island, is 1 mile long and 0.7 mile wide. The bottom is rocky and kelp extends some distance from shore in places. Small craft entering with care can anchor in 5 to 8 feet at the head.

(77) Cape Kostromitinof on the north shore of Marmot Bay, is a projecting, long, level, wooded point, about 200 feet high, with bluffs in places at the water. North from the cape the land rises gradually in a distance of 5.5 miles to Duck Mountain a prominent peak, 2,048 feet high.

(78) Kazakof Bay referred to as Danger Bay by local fishermen, extends 6 miles in a north direction from the northwest part of Marmot Bay. Anchorage for small vessels is found at the head of the bay. (See Routes, Kazakof Bay.)

(79) The cove on the east side, 3.5 miles above the entrance to Kazakof Bay, affords shelter for a small vessel anchored in 12 to 14 fathoms. Small craft can anchor in the southeast end of the cove in about 5 fathoms. A reef extends about 100 yards off the south side of the entrance. The small bight in the east shore is shoal. In 1981, a logging camp was operating on the east side of the cove.

(80) Parrot Island round, rocky, and 70 feet high, is in the entrance to Kazakof Bay. Channels for entering are on either side of the broken ground on which Parrot Island and other rocky islets and rocks awash are grouped. A submerged ledge with some kelp and a depth of 3½ fathoms is about 0.8 to 1.5 mile southeast of Parrot Island; its north end is 0.5 mile off Cape Kostromitinof.

(81) Stripe Rock 2.8 miles south of Parrot Island, is marked by a prominent white streak that extends along the entire height of the rock. It is composed of two pinnacles close together, about 35 feet high; the white streak is on the higher of the two pinnacles. A large bare ledge, 30 feet high, is between Stripe Rock and Parrot Island.

(82) West of Stripe Rock and the large bare ledge, the area extending to the shore is mostly foul and should be avoided by vessels.

(83) Routes
(84) Routes, Kazakof Bay: From east, shape the course for a position about 0.5 mile south of Cape Kostromitinof. Head for Parrot Island on a 305° course until the southwest end of the cape is a little forward of the beam. Change to 330° and pass 0.25 mile off the southwest end of the cape and the same distance northeast of Parrot Island.

(85) Then steer 359° with Parrot Island astern, to the head of the bay. Above Parrot Island, give the shores a wide berth and avoid the low bare rock about 0.4 mile from the east shore and about 0.6 mile from the head of the bay. The anchorage is about 0.4 mile west of this rock in about 18 fathoms, mud and gravel bottom. The head of Kazakof Bay separates into two arms. Small vessels can anchor in 8 to 10 fathoms, either in the broadest part of the west arm 0.3 mile from its head or in the entrance to the east arm.

(86) From southwest, keep Hog Island open from the northwest side of Whale Island until Stripe Rock is in range with the east side of Cape Kostromitinof. Then steer 041° for 1.3 miles to a position 0.25 mile east of Stripe Rock. Then steer 006° for 1.1 miles to a position 0.25 mile east of a bare ledge about 15 feet high. Then steer 333° for 0.9 mile. Then steer 358° for 0.8 mile, keeping Stripe Rock open west of the bare ledge astern until Parrot Island is 0.5 mile on the starboard beam. From this position a 005° course will lead to the head of the bay.

(87) Afognak Bay the west tributary to Marmot Bay, makes into Afognak Island about 3.5 miles. There is secure anchorage off an abandoned cannery at Rivermouth Point near the head. (See Routes, Afognak Bay.) Litnik is an abandoned village on Afognak River at the head of the bay. The approach from Marmot Bay is through Eastern Passage between Hog Island and Big Rock. This approach is endangered by a rock awash, marked by a buoy, 0.6 mile southeast of Big Rock. Foul ground marked by kelp extends about 350 yards from Hog Island into Eastern Passage, and shoal water extends about 0.3 mile south-southwest of Big Rock.

(88) A straight channel, bordered by dangers, leads from Eastern Passage to the central part of Afognak Bay. On the northeast side of the channel are the Skipwith Reefs, with shoal water projecting channelward. On the southwest side is Danger Reef which uncovers about 5 feet. An unmarked 3¼-fathom shoal is 1 mile southeast of the reef. A rock, covered 1¾ fathoms, was reported 0.6 mile northwest of Danger Reef.

(89) Hog Island is the prominent mark for approaching Afognak Bay and also Afognak Strait. It is 0.4 mile long and has two wooded knolls with a saddle in between.

(90) Hog Island Light (58°00'07"N., 152°41'11"W.), 40 feet above the water, is shown from a skeleton tower with a red and white diamond-shaped daymark on the south side of Hog Island.

(91) Big Rock 1 mile from Hog Island with Eastern Passage between, is comparatively narrow, irregular and over 100 yards long in a north and south direction.

(92) Skipwith Reefs a chain of bare rocks and reefs, extend about 1.9 miles northwest from Big Rock to Lamb Island. The southwest side of the rocks should be given a berth of over 0.4 mile.

(93) Lamb Island 0.5 mile long and wooded, is near the point that marks the outer end of the east shore of Afognak Bay. The area between the point that marks the outer end of the east shore of the bay and Lamb Island is foul and should be avoided.

(94) Alexander Island 0.8 mile east of Lamb Island, is grass covered and has a knob about 80 feet high at its north end. Foul ground surrounds the island and extends 1.2 miles toward Stripe Rock.

(95) Dot Island small and wooded, is the westernmost of three small islands close to Posliedni Point where Afognak Bay narrows to 0.5 mile. On the west shore opposite Dot Island is a cascade where water can be obtained by boat.

(96) Graveyard Point marks the outer end of the west shore of Afognak Bay; Lipsett Point is the next point inside the bay. Aleut Village is on the shore of the bight between these points.

(97) Village Reefs partly bare at low water and covered with kelp, extend over 1 mile east from the shore around Graveyard Point toward Hog Island. The point of the reefs is midway between Graveyard Point and Hog Island. Southeast from the point of the reefs is a detached shoal with a least reported depth of 2 fathoms. Between this shoal and the reef extending 650 yards southwest from Hog Island is a channel 0.5 mile wide. This channel is sometimes used by vessels, with local knowledge, to enter Afognak Bay from Afognak Strait.

(98) Head Point is 1.4 miles south of Graveyard Point, and between these points is the former village of Afognak whose inhabitants moved to Settler Cove in 1965. The white church with green roof, 0.3 mile south of Graveyard Point, is the best mark in the village.

(99) Small vessels can anchor in 5 fathoms near the kelp on Village Reefs, with the church in Afognak bearing 344° and Head Point in line with Deranof Rock. Little current will be felt here, but there is exposure to east winds.

(100) Routes
(101) Routes, Afognak Bay: from northeast, keep Hog Island open from the northwest side of Whale Island, bearing anything west of 250°; this range will lead about 0.3 mile southeast of the rock awash 0.6 mile southeast of Big Rock. After Big Rock appears in range with the east end of Lamb Island, turn to pass midway between Big Rock and Hog Island and steer 315° for the old cannery building at Rivermouth Point, showing midway between Dot Island and Posliedni Point. Keep this range for about 2 miles until the west end of Lamb Island is abeam. Then steer 308° for 1.8 miles and pass 400 to 500 yards south of Dot Island. Keep this course for about 0.3 mile past Dot Island until 0.25 mile off the cascade on the west shore. Then steer 353° for 0.8 mile, favoring slightly the west shore. Anchor near midchannel off the old cannery at Rivermouth Point in 8 to 10 fathoms. The anchorage is clear if Winter Island in the west arm, is given a clearance of 300 yards and Last Point on the north shore, 400 yards.

(102) From south steer 359° with Big Rock and the southwest end of Alexander Island on range ahead, to pass east of Hog Island. When the north end of Hog Island is abeam, turn from the range to pass midway between Big Rock and Hog Island.

(103) Whale Island at the west end of Marmot Bay, is about 4 miles in diameter. Its south half is a grass-covered mountain, 2,028 feet high, with a narrow light streak down its east slope. The north side of the island is low, and the lower parts of the island are generally wooded. Treeless Islet rocky and grass covered, is 0.4 mile off the east side of the north end of the island. Whale Passage and Afognak Strait are south and north of Whale Island, respectively.

(104) Afognak Strait between Whale and Afognak Islands, is used mostly by small vessels.

(105) The currents in the strait are only half as strong as in Whale Passage. The dangers are marked by kelp, which grows in depths up to about 6 fathoms and shows at slack water.

(106) If precaution is taken, navigation is not difficult on a clear day when the marks for the strait can be seen and when the summit of Kupreanof Mountain is not hidden. The range formed by this mountain peak and Deranof Rock, off Deranof Island, effectively marks the channel through Afognak Strait, except in the central part of the strait and just inside the west entrance. In the central part of the strait the range passes close to the edge of foul ground making out from the north shore; here a vessel should guard against going anything north of the range. Just outside the west entrance, a 2½-fathom depth on a rock lying 630 yards from the Whale Island shore is just north of the range. The channel is just south of the rock, and here it is necessary to deviate a little south of the range to avoid the rock; the channel is only 380 yards wide between the 2½-fathom rock and the reef making out from Chiachi Point; the general depth is 24 feet.

(107) A reef awash is 0.45 mile north-northwest from Chiachi Point or 310 yards north of Kupreanof Mountain-Deranof Rock range.

(108) Most of the N half of Afognak Strait is foul. Southwest of Head Point the foul ground extends 0.3 mile offshore and its south edge is near the Kupreanof Mountain-Deranof Rock range.

(109) Dolphin Point is the northeast end of Whale Island. A reef, partly bare at low water, extends 600 yards from Whale Island at a point 0.3 mile west of Dolphin Point.

(110) Fox Bay the bight in Whale Island 1 mile west of Dolphin Point, has in its entrance a reef that uncovers at low water. A small vessel can anchor in the bay inside the reef in 4 to 5 fathoms, but the south shore must be given a berth of 300 yards.

(111) West of Fox Bay the shore of Whale Island is clear to Chiachi Point the northwest end of the island, from which a shelving reef makes out about 350 yards in a northwest direction.

(112) Temporary anchorage may be had in the channel of Afognak Strait between Fox Bay and former Afognak village, in 7 to 8 fathoms but exposed to the full strength of the currents and to east and north winds.

(113) A good anchorage in Afognak Strait but exposed to east weather can be had in 5 to 7 fathoms about 400 yards off a gravel beach on the southeast end of Little Raspberry Island. The bottom is sand and gravel and the anchorage is suitable for large or small vessels. To make this anchorage from the east, hold a 270° course with the south end of Little Raspberry Island ahead. The end of this island can be recognized as the north side of the passage north of Deranof Island. Remain on the bearing 270° on the south end of Little Raspberry Island in order to avoid foul ground off Shoal Point and to avoid a rock south of this course that uncovers 1 foot. This rock is marked by kelp that tows under at most stages of the tide. If this course is used coming into this anchorage or for small vessels in The Narrows it is possible to select a good range for this course, with the south tip of Little Raspberry Island against the slope of a mountain on Raspberry Island near Last Timber Point.

(114) With east winds, small vessels can anchor in about 4 fathoms about 0.3 mile west of Afognak Point on the north side of Afognak Strait; caution is required. When rounding into the anchorage, pass northeast of a reef, bare at low water, 0.4 mile southwest of the point; give the point a berth of over 300 yards.

(115) Deranof Island 0.5 mile long, low and wooded, is the southernmost and largest of the islands at the west end of Afognak Strait.

(116) Deranof Rock about 15 feet high, is nearly 200 yards south of the island. Broken ground with a least depth of 2½ fathoms is 0.4 mile east of the island and 074° from Deranof Rock.

(117) Tidal currents
(118) The tidal currents in Afognak Strait set west on the flood and east on the ebb. The estimated velocity is 2 to 5 knots at strength, depending on the range of the tide. During the flood there is a strong set into Raspberry Strait; this should be kept in mind when in the west end of Afognak Strait.

(119) Routes
(120) Routes, Afognak Strait:From east in Marmot Bay, the initial approach to Afognak Strait can be made by keeping Hog Island west of 250° and passing 0.25 mile or more south of Hog Island and 0.5 mile north of Dolphin Point.

(121) Passing 0.5 mile northwest of Dolphin Point, steer for Deranof Rock in range with the summit of Kupreanof Mountain or, if the mountain is obscured, steer for Deranof Rock with the south end of Hog Island astern, course 253°. Off Head Point and for 0.8 mile to the west, go nothing north of the range. When approaching the west end of the strait, keep a little south of the range to avoid the rock with 2½ fathoms over it, but give the shore of Whale Island a berth of over 300 yards; on the flood, guard against a north set toward Raspberry Strait.

(122) When Occident Point bears 180° steer 234° and pass 0.28 mile southeast of Deranof Rock. Continue the course 0.8 mile past the rock and then steer 286° with the summit of Whale Island astern. This course made good will lead through Kupreanof Strait, passing 0.4 to 0.6 mile south of Gori Point, 0.9 mile north of Outlet Cape and 0.5 mile south of Malina Point.

(123) Raspberry Strait is described later in this chapter.

(124) Raspberry Island extending from Shelikof Strait to Afognak Strait, is about 15 miles long in a northwest and southeast direction and averages about 4 miles wide. On the northeast side it is separated from Afognak Island by Raspberry Strait, and Kupreanof Strait borders its southwest side. This island is rugged and mountainous with elevations up to 2,350 feet. Most of the shores are bold and precipitous except where numerous valleys meet the shore. The island is grass covered except for the West side along Shelikof Strait, where it is predominantly bare sheer cliffs, and along the southeast half of Raspberry Strait, where the island is heavily covered with spruce.

(125) The description of features along the various shores of this island is given in connection with the information pertaining to Kupreanof, Raspberry and Shelikof Straits.

(126) Whale Passage south of Whale Island, joins Kupreanof Strait to form a part of the main route between Kodiak and Shelikof Strait. Strong tidal currents occur in Whale Passage. Eddies may cause vessels to veer toward danger. When transiting east it is best to pass south of Ilkognak Rock.The south shore of Whale Passage is foul with rocks and kelp; the north shore is generally clear of obstructions. The islands bordering both sides of Kupreanof Strait are grass covered and mountainous, especially the north shore, which rises abruptly. The timber extends west along the shore to Last Timber Point and Dry Spruce Island, where it terminates except for scattered clumps. Navigation in the daytime is not difficult when the current is not too strong; however, careful attention to steering is required under any condition.

(127) Ilkognak Rock Light (57°54'49"N., 152°47'02"W.), 18 feet above the water, is shown from a pile, with a red and white diamond-shaped daymark in the middle of the east entrance to Whale Passage. Broken ground, covered 3½ fathoms, is 0.3 mile east of the light, and a rock, covered 2¾ fathoms, is 0.1 mile west of the light. Broken ground, covered 3½ fathoms, is 0.2 mile northeast of the light. A strong ebb current, heavy swirls, and upwelling occur in the wake of this broken ground, and dangerous tide rips prevail at such times with northeast gales. A rock, marked by a buoy, is about 0.4 mile north of the light. A rock pile, marked by a daybeacon, 0.1 mile off Whale Island and 0.8 mile northwest of the light, uncovers about 3 feet. A rock, covered 17 feet, is 0.3 mile off Whale Island and 0.9 mile northwest of the light; heavy swirls and eddies occur in this area.

(128) Shag Rocks 0.4 mile southwest of Ilkognak Rock Light, uncovers about 2 to 3 feet.

(129) Koniuji Island marked by a light, 0.25 mile from the south side of Whale Passage and 2 miles northwest of Ilkognak Rock Light, is 40 feet high and grass covered. Kelp extends 0.2 mile west from the island. Koniuji Island should be given a good berth on the north side as the current sets toward it at times.

(130) Kupreanof Strait 1.5 to 3 miles wide, is clear in midchannel except for a shoal area 2.5 miles south-southeast of Bukti Point.

(131) Chernof Point on the south shore of Kupreanof Strait, 5.3 miles west of Ilkognak Rock Light, is low and wooded but prominent. A ledge of rock about 150 feet long and 50 feet wide, 0.6 mile west of the point and 0.2 mile offshore, uncovers about 5 feet; it is marked by heavy kelp. Ostrovka Point 2 miles west of Chernof Point, is low and wooded; a high grassy islet is close-to.

(132) Broken ground, covered 4½ to 10 fathoms, extends 4.5 miles northwest from Chernof Point up to 0.6 mile off Ostrovka Point and Dry Spruce Island.

(133) Last Timber Point Light 6 (57°58'40"N., 152°59'01"W.), 35 feet above the water, is shown from a small house with a triangular red daymark on the point on the north side of Kupreanof Strait, 7.5 miles northwest of Ilkognak Rock Light. Thomas Rock 1.5 miles east-southeast of Last Timber Point Light 6, is awash at low water; a patch, covered 6 fathoms, is 0.2 mile southwest of the rock.

(134) Gori Point 2.5 miles west of Last Timber Point Light 6, is the base of an abrupt sloping ridge with its summits close to the shore.

(135) Kupreanof Mountain on Kupreanof Peninsula 10 miles west of Ilkognak Rock Light, is 2,440 feet high and consists of prominent broken gray rock.

(136) Dry Spruce Island on the south side of Kupreanof Strait 8.5 miles west of Ilkognak Rock Light, is 225 feet high and wooded. Dry Spruce Island Rock Light 7 (57°57'53"N., 153°04'11"W.), 30 feet above the water, is shown from a tower with a square green daymark off the northwest end of the island on a ledge that uncovers about 6 feet. Two grassy islets and a pinnacle rock are off the north side of the west end of the island.

(137) A small wooded island and shoals, dry at low water, are between Dry Spruce Island and Drying Point the end of the mainland on the north side of Dry Spruce Bay.

(138) Bare Island just west of Dry Spruce Island, is partly wooded on its east half. Dry Spruce Bay Entrance Light (57°57'20"N., 153°06'12"W.), 76 feet above the water, is shown from a skeleton tower with a red and white diamond-shaped daymark on a small grassy island 0.4 mile west of Bare Island.

(139) A rock, covered 2½ fathoms is marked by a buoy about 3.3 miles northwest of the entrance to Dry Spruce Bay.

(140) Anchorages
(141) Temporary anchorage can be had in the bight on the north side of Whale Passage if stopped by too strong a flood current in the passage east. There is an eddy current in the bight, and care should be taken to get in far enough to ride to the eddy alone. A good place is in 8 fathoms, 300 yards from Whale Island, with Koniuji Island bearing about 238°.

(142) A better anchorage can be had 0.3 to 0.4 mile off the west side of Whale Island, in 8 to 10 fathoms. This is convenient to either Whale Passage or Afognak Strait and is well out of the current; the anchorage is exposed to west winds.

(143) Anchorage may be had in places near the shore of Kupreanof Peninsula, but the only secure harbor is Dry Spruce Bay.

(144) Currents
(145) Passage through Whale Passage at times of maximum current should be avoided. Floating aids to navigation may be dragged under or off station during these periods; mariners are urged to exercise particular caution. The tidal currents in Whale Passage set northwest on the flood and southeast on the ebb. During large tides, the currents are very strong with boils and swirls. The current velocity can reach 5 to 7 knots. (See the Tidal Current Tables for predictions.) Slack water was observed to occur from 1 to 2 hours later than predicted.

(146) The tidal currents at Kupreanof Strait have an estimated velocity of 2 to 3 knots during large tides. At the west end of Kupreanof Strait near Onion Bay, high and low water occur about the same time as at Seldovia. The tides meet in the strait a little west of Dry Spruce Island.

(147) Routes
(148) Enter Whale Passage on a 262° course from Kizhuyak Bay, passing south of the buoy off Yuzhni Point and 0.25 mile north of Ilkognak Rock Light. When Ilkognak Rock Light bears 118° 0.5 mile, and Inner Point bears 180° change course to 298°. Gori Point, open a little south of the south end of Koniuji Island, heads south of the 2½-fathom rock. When Uzkosti Point bears 023° 0.3 mile, change course to 317° until 0.3 mile north of Koniuji Island, then change to course 292° until 0.4 mile off Gori Point where a 286° course will lead into Shelikof Strait, passing 0.5 mile south of Malina Point Light. This route passes 0.5 mile north of a buoyed 2½-fathom shoal, 3.9 miles west of Gori Point.

(149) Larger vessels can also enter Whale Passage on a 309° course from Kizhuyak Bay, passing 0.2 mile south of Ilkognak Rock Light to Konijuji Island. When Koniuji Island is abeam to the port side, change course to 289° until Deranof Rock bears 029° where a course of 285° will lead to the Western side of Kupreanof Strait. This route passes 0.55 mile north of a buoyed 2½-fathom shoal, 3.9 miles west of Gori Point.

(150) Some of the courses are at an angle with the axis of the current; natural ranges should be used to aid in maintaining the courses.

(151) Dry Spruce Bay on the north side of Kodiak Island and on the south side of Kupreanof Strait, may be entered on either the north or south side of Bare Island.

(152) Approaching Dry Spruce Bay from east, give Dry Spruce Island a berth of 0.8 mile and steer for the west end of Bare Island on any bearing south of 226° until past Dry Spruce Island Rock Light 7; then haul east and pass midway between Dry Spruce and Bare Islands, course about 139°. This route is contracted to about 400 yards by a low water rock about 200 yards from shore inside the west end of Dry Spruce Island. Shoal water extends from the east end of Bare Island.

(153) In approaching Dry Spruce Bay west of Bare Island, care is necessary to avoid the foul ground extending over 0.2 mile from the south shore of Kupreanof Strait, 1.7 miles west of Bare Island.

(154) Port Bailey cannery and wharf are on the south shore of Dry Spruce Bay. The cannery is used as a lodge. The 150-foot-long wharf has depths of 27 feet alongside. Unlighted mooring dolphins are along the shore southeast of the cannery.

(155) Air service is available to and from Kodiak once a week during the off season and daily except Sunday during the open season.

(156) The best anchorage for large vessels is about 0.5 mile east of Bare Island and 0.4 mile off the cove in Dry Spruce Island, in 16 to 19 fathoms. A small vessel can anchor in the middle of the entrance to this cove in about 6 fathoms taking care to keep clear of the flat that extends 250 yards from its northeast side. With strong southwest winds, some williwaws are felt from Kupreanof Mountain. A midbay rock awash is 0.7 mile from the head of Dry Spruce Bay.

(157) Pilotage, Port Bailey
(158) Pilotage, except for certain exempted vessels, is compulsory for all vessels navigating the waters of the State of Alaska.

(159) The Kodiak Island area is served by the Southwest Alaska Pilots Association. (See Pilotage, General (indexed), Chapter 3, for the pilot pickup stations and other details.)

(160) Vessels en route to Port Bailey can contact the pilot boat by calling “PORT BAILEY PILOT BOAT” on VHF-FM channel 16 or on a prearranged frequency between pilot and agent/vessel.

(161) Outlet Cape is the west end of Kupreanof Peninsula included between Kupreanof Strait and Viekoda Bay. The cape has a steep slope to a peak 1,607 feet high, east of which is a low divide. Laida Rocks are a cluster of bare rocks 350 yards off the northwest end of the cape.

(162) Viekoda Bay is described later in this chapter.

(163) Onion Bay makes into Raspberry Island about 2 miles, and from its head a low divide extends through to Shelikof Strait. The entrance is narrow and, just inside, the bay is blocked by shoals partly bare at low water, between which are narrow channels suitable only for small craft. The tidal currents have an estimated velocity of 3 to 5 knots in the entrance. Temporary anchorage can be had 0.4 to 0.5 mile off the entrance in 10 to 15 fathoms.

(164) Malina Point Light (58°02'19"N., 153°21'58"W.), 80 feet above the water, is shown from a skeleton tower with a red and white diamond-shaped daymark at the south end of the mountainous headland on the southwest part of Raspberry Island. The point itself is projecting and prominent. It has a grass-covered knoll at its end, with a low neck behind it, and then a steep slope to 1,570 feet.

(165) During northeast weather, small craft can find excellent protection behind Malina Point.

(166) Raspberry Cape at the west end of the mountainous headland on the southwest part of Raspberry Island, is steep and high and has areas of bare rock. There are some bare rocks in the water close to the foot of the cape.

(167) Local magnetic disturbance
(168) Differences of as much as 3° from normal variation have been observed in Kupreanof Strait about 0.4 mile south of Raspberry Cape.

(169) Kizhuyak Bay is the continuation of Marmot Bay, and from Whale Island and Kizhuyak Point it extends south for about 14 miles into Kodiak Island. The outer bay is exposed to northeast weather, and only at or near the head is protection afforded from seas sweeping in from Marmot Bay. A landlocked anchorage for small vessels is available in Anton Larsen Bay, but local knowledge is required to navigate its narrow entrance channel. Larger vessels can anchor in 9 fathoms outside of the bay. Sharatin Bay, another arm, is exposed to seas from the northeast and southerly winds coming through the mountains.

(170) A midchannel course in Kizhuyak Bay is clear of known dangers. However, a bank of 6 to 9 fathoms irregular in outline and comprised of large sand waves, extends southeast across the Bay from Port Wakefield to the eastern shore between Leto Point and Kekur Point. A similar rocky bottom exists between opposite shores in the locality of the islet, 2.5 miles from the head.

(171) Peregrebni Point on the west side of Kizhuyak Bay, is on a wooded peninsula that is backed by Settler Cove. The bottom of the cove favoring the west shore is sandy with some rocks along the peninsula containing Port Wakefield. Depths gradually decrease, from about 4 fathoms just inside the entrance, to the mudflats at the head of the cove.

(172) Port Lions is the name given in 1965 to a settlement near the head of Settler Cove, created when all the inhabitants of Afognak moved in and declared it their new home. A good small-craft anchorage is 0.5 mile northeast of the village. A breakwater forms a small-boat harbor about 0.5 mile northeast of Port Lions. A light is on the east end of the breakwater and a daybeacon marks the east side of the harbor entrance. In 2012, reported depths of 14 to 24 feet were available on the approach from the northeast with 14 feet in the center of the harbor entrance between the breakwater and daymark. Depths of 9 to 12 feet were reported along the southwest pier with 12 to 16 feet reported along the center and north piers. The small-boat harbor has moorage for about 80 vessels. A ferry runs to Port Lions twice a week.


(174) Port Wakefield is at the head of Port Wakefield, a cove on the west side of Kizhuyak Bay about 0.7 mile southwest of Peregrebni Point. A shoal is off the entrance to Port Wakefield. A causeway across the shallow head of Settler Cove connects Port Wakefield with Port Lions. A City Dock extends 200 feet from shore on the east side of the cove. The outer face is 250 feet; 24 feet reported alongside; deck height, 10 feet; used for receipt of conventional general cargo and petroleum products; and landing for passenger and vehicular ferry.

(175) Pilotage, Port Wakefield
(176) Pilotage, except for certain exempted vessels, is compulsory for all vessels navigating the waters of the State of Alaska.

(177) The Kodiak Island area is served by the Southwest Alaska Pilots Association. (See Pilotage, General (indexed), Chapter 3, for the pilot pickup stations and other details.)

(178) Vessels en route to Port Wakefield can contact the pilot boat by calling “PORT WAKEFIELD PILOT BOAT” on VHF-FM channel 16 or on a prearranged frequency between pilot and agent/vessel.

(179) At Peregrebni Point the bay narrows to a width of 1.6 miles. The west shore from 1.2 to 4.5 miles south of Peregrebni Point is foul; a rock awash is 2.6 miles south of the point and 0.4 mile from the west shore.

(180) A flat extends 0.5 mile from the head of Kizhuyak Bay, where there is a large valley. Vessels may anchor off this flat in 19 fathoms, mud bottom; the depths are regular and there is ample room.

(181) Kekur Point marks the north end of the east shore of the narrow part of Kizhuyak Bay. A rocky patch of 6 fathoms is 0.9 mile 032° from Kekur Point.

(182) Between Kekur Point and Kizhuyak Point, the west shore of the outer bay is indented by Sharatin Bay and Anton Larsen Bay. The waters along the intervening shore between the two bays, from Three Pillar Point to Crag Point, have several submerged rocks about 0.3 to 0.4 mile from that shore. A patch of broken ground, with a depth of 9 fathoms, is 1.4 miles west-northwest of Crag Point.. Off Anton Larsen Bay are covered rocks and seasonal kelp with a reported depth of only 6 feet, 0.9 mile 006° from Crag Point.

(183) Sharatin Bay east of Kekur Point, has a small grass-covered islet near the center of the bay. A rock, covered 1 fathom, is 400 yards north of the islet. A rock that uncovers 4 feet is 300 yards off the projecting point of the bay shore west of the islet. A rock covered 6 feet is about 0.5 mile north-northwest of Three Pillar Point. Sharatin Bay, with a muddy bottom, can be used for safe anchorage in 8 to 10 fathoms; a tide flat extends 0.6 mile from the head of the bay.

(184) Anton Larsen Bay between the point 0.9 mile south of Kizhuyak Point and Crag Point, has its entrance nearly blocked by islands; only small craft can enter. A rock, covered 6 feet and marked by seasonal kelp, is about 0.5 mile north of the outer entrance island north of Crag Point. A reef, bare at minus tides, lies 260 yards 045° from Crag Point. The passage into the bay east of Crag Point and the two passages at the north entrance are very narrow.

(185) The northernmost passage into Anton Larsen Bay was used by a survey tender, 77 feet long and drawing 6½ feet. The entrance to this passage is between the northernmost island in the bay entrance and the north point of the bay. About 0.3 mile inside this entrance and about 130 yards from the mainland is a large rocky patch, part of which uncovers. The channel is south of this rocky patch. At the narrowest part of this passage is a small, narrow islet which hugs and parallels the mainland. The survey indicates that the channel borders close along the outer side of the narrow islet and makes a slight turn around the west end of the islet. Opposite the west end of the islet, the southwest side of the channel is bordered by rocks. Extreme caution and local knowledge are necessary.

(186) Anton Larsen Bay has a 3-mile stretch of water about 0.5 mile wide, extending in a south direction from the north entrance passage. A rock, awash at high tide, is in the middle of this stretch, about 1 mile from the entrance passage. The channel is between the rock and the shore west of it. A vessel may anchor about 0.3 mile south of the rock in about 15 fathoms. A small pier is on the southwest end of the bay; ice from snow runoff can be found in the bay beginning in October.

(187) A road runs from the west side of Anton Larsen Bay to Kodiak. It is closed during the winter.

(188) Kizhuyak Point marks the outer end of the east side of Kizhuyak Bay. A 2¼-fathom depth in a kelp patch is about 0.8 mile 210° from Kizhuyak Point.

(189) The broad point 0.8 mile northeast of Kizhuyak Point is partly wooded and terminates in white cliffs in places. A rock, which uncovers about 4 feet, is 400 yards north from this point. Shoal water extends 300 yards north of the rock.

(190) Between the broad point and Shakmanof Point is Shakmanof Cove. A rock, covered 3 feet, is near the center of this cove.

(191) Shakmanof Point on the south side of Marmot Bay about 2 miles west of the entrance to Narrow Strait, is prominent and heavily wooded. Some rocks awash are close to the point, and it should be given a berth of over 300 yards.

(192) Shakmanof Point Light (57°55'31"N., 152°35'16"W.), 60 feet above the water, is shown from a skeleton tower with a red and white diamond-shaped daymark.

(193) Low Island Anchorage the cove between Shakmanof Point and Low Island, affords anchorage in suitable depths but it is exposed to north weather. North winds in this locality are infrequent.

(194) Three Brothers 1.2 miles east of Shakmanof Point, is a kelp-marked reef 600 yards long and steep-to on its west side. Parts of the reef uncover about 2 feet. Near its southwest end are two rocks that uncover about 4 feet, and at its northeast end is a rock that uncovers about 3 feet. A light is on the southwesternmost rock. Kelp extends about 250 yards south of the light toward Low Island.

(195) Low Island in the middle of the bight on the south shore of Marmot Bay between Shakmanof Point and the west entrance to Narrow Strait, is grass covered and about 40 feet high at its south end. Most of the island is wooded.

(196) Vessels cross the 7-fathom bank or bar about 0.3 mile north-northeast of Low Island, bound to or from Narrow Strait. A range consisting of Prokoda Island Light 2 just open on the nearly vertical bluffs of Ouzinkie Point leads between a red buoy marking a submerged rock on the north side of the crossing and a green buoy marking a 3½-fathom shoal on the south side of the crossing. A survey along the range reveals a clear depth of 30 feet. It is required, however, that no deviation from the range be made. The submerged rock is 800 yards from Low Island and has less than 14 feet over it. The 3½-fathom shoal is at the end of a reef extending north from Low Island. These dangers are marked by kelp.

(197) The passage south of Low Island is blocked by shoals that bare at low tide.

(198) Narrow Strait and Ouzinkie Narrows are described later in this chapter.

(199) Spruce Island on the south side of Marmot Bay, is about 6 miles long in an east and west direction. The island is rugged, with Mount Herman 1,595 feet high 2 miles west of East Cape. The lower elevations are in general heavily wooded, with a low wooded area 0.8 to 1 mile wide extending between the east shore of the island and the base of Mount Herman. Grass is quite pronounced on the higher slopes of Spruce Island. The higher summits are barren. The waters adjacent to the north and east shores of the island have not been completely surveyed.

(200) About 1 mile off the west shore of Spruce Island and approximately on a line between Three Brothers and Wooded Island are two dangers: a kelp-marked shoal with a depth of 2 fathoms is about 1 mile from Three Brothers and a rocky islet, 24 feet high, 0.9 mile from Wooded Island.

(201) Reefs extend 600 yards off the west shore of Spruce Island, 0.8 mile north of Ouzinkie Point, described later in this chapter.

(202) Wooded Island 174 feet high, is 300 yards off Zapadni Point the promontory on the west side of Spruce Island. It is heavily wooded. A fair anchorage protected from east winds can be had just to the south of the island. A 3-fathom shoal is 700 yards 098° from the southwest end of Wooded Island.

(203) The Triplets 2 miles west of North Cape, are a chain of three high, grassy islets extending 1 mile in a general north and south direction. The northernmost islet, 275-foot Taliudek Island is the highest of the group.

(204) North Cape the north headland of Spruce Island, is a wooded knob 551 feet high. Rocky islets and rocks awash at various stages of the tide fringe the north side of the cape within 400 yards of the shore. A shoal of 2¼ fathoms is 0.4 mile off the east point of the cape.

(205) Island Bay just south of North Cape and opening to the east, has not been surveyed. It affords fair anchorage for medium-size craft from west wind. If small craft use the head of the bay, care should be taken to pass north of a rock awash at low water about 0.3 mile from the head.

(206) Knee Bay is the outer portion of the indentation in the north shore of Spruce Island about 2 miles south of North Cape. Balika Cove narrow and about 1 mile long, is the continuation of Knee Bay. The bay and cove have not been surveyed. The first enclosure of Balika Cove affords excellent shelter for small craft but can be entered only at high tide because of a ledge at the entrance to the cove.

(207) The north shore of Spruce Island between Knee Bay and East Cape is bordered by rocky islets and rocks awash at various stages of the tide. Some of these are over 0.3 mile offshore.

(208) East Cape the northeast end of Spruce Island, is a wooded flat extending about 0.8 mile inland to the base of Mount Herman. A group of bare rocks is within 300 yards east of the cape. Banks with depths partly under 10 fathoms extend nearly 2 miles northeast of the cape.

(209) A rock awash at low water is about 0.5 mile south of the point of East Cape and 400 yards from the east shore of Spruce Island.

(210) Two wooded islands, forming Ostrof Point about 1 mile south of East Cape, are surrounded and connected to the east shore of Spruce Island by a reef. The outer part of this reef terminates in a rock, which uncovers about 2 feet, 300 yards east of the outer island. Rocks awash at low tide are 0.3 mile northeast of the outer island. A rock, which uncovers about 4 feet, is 250 yards south of the outer island.

(211) Icon Bay is the small indentation in the east shore of Spruce Island halfway between East Cape and South Point. This bay, as well as the adjoining small bays to the south, has not been surveyed. Shoaling to 1½ fathoms is in the middle of the bay. It is reported that a medium-sized craft may find temporary anchorage in west weather. A rock awash baring near low water is 300 yards from the head and 150 yards from the north shore of Icon Bay.

(212) Narrow Strait between Spruce and Kodiak Islands, is used by vessels bound from Kodiak to Shelikof Strait. It has a clear width of 1 mile at its east end, while at its west end the channel is 100 to 300 yards wide with a least depth of about 7 fathoms. With east gales a heavy swell sets into the strait, but this generally loses much of its force toward the west end.

(213) Ouzinkie Narrows, the narrow passage of Narrow Strait in the vicinity of Otmeloi Point and Prokoda Island, is described later in this chapter.

(214) The west approach to Narrow Strait is south of Three Brothers and across the buoyed 7-fathom bank 0.3 mile north-northeast of Low Island.

(215) The best anchorage in Narrow Strait is in the middle of Ouzinkie Harbor between Prokoda Island and Ouzinkie, in 18 to 20 fathoms, somewhat exposed to an east swell. A small vessel and small craft can anchor at the head of Ouzinkie Harbor near Ouzinkie, slightly favoring the west side, in 5 to 10 fathoms.

(216) South Point the east end of Spruce Island, is marked by a high black rocky islet about 600 yards off the point. This rocky islet is 65 feet high; several lower ones are just to the south and west thereof.

(217) Two islands are on the north side of Narrow Strait. Eider Island the east one, is very uneven and grassy on top. A small low rocky islet is 400 yards east of the east island, and a rock awash at low water is 200 yards south of the east island. Nelson Island the west one of the two islands, is higher and wooded. A group of rocks, which uncover 5 feet, is 350 yards south of Nelson Island and similar rocks are 0.3 to 0.4 mile west of the island.

(218) The passages leading to the cove back of Nelson Island are mainly foul or composed of broken bottom. They should be avoided by vessels of any size, except perhaps by small craft with local knowledge.

(219) Sunny Cove the bight on the north shore of Narrow Strait, 2.3 miles northwest of South Point, affords anchorage for small craft in 3 to 4 fathoms, sand bottom. A ledge covered 1½ fathoms is 0.3 mile south from the west point of the entrance to Sunny Cove. Two bare rocks are off the middle of the entrance. A rock awash is 90 yards northwest from the east point of the entrance. In entering, the west shore of Sunny Cove should be favored.

(220) A rocky patch, covered 2¾ fathoms and marked by kelp, is 0.3 mile from the north shore of Narrow Strait just southeast of Black Point.

(221) Prokoda Island in the middle near the west end of the strait, is 114 feet high and partly wooded. An islet is 100 yards off its northeast end, and kelp extends 100 yards off the islet and the southeast side of the island.

(222) Prokoda Island Light 2 (57°54'38"N., 152°30'23"W.), 40 feet above the water, is shown from a small house with a red triangular daymark on the southwest point of the island. The light is a guide for navigating the passage south of the island.

(223) The channel north and west of Prokoda Island is 300 yards wide and clear, but the turns are sharp and difficult to make when the current is running.

(224) Ouzinkie is a small native village at the head of the cove in Spruce Island north of Prokoda Island. The most conspicuous features in the town are the warehouse close to the near shore of the cove, the Russian Orthodox Church spire and the boardwalk that runs around the north side of the cove. Fishing is the principal industry in Ouzinkie.

(225) An L-shaped pier, connected to land at both ends, is on the west side of the cove and can handle vessels up to 120 feet long and drawing about 15 feet. A grid of sawed-off pilings is along the east side of this pier; the grid is considered hazardous because of the steel spikes protruding upward from the piles. A foul area is about 100 feet southwest of this pier. A cannery and pier were built over the water on the east side of the cove. The pier can accommodate vessels 80 feet long and drawing 12 feet. A rock, covered 6 feet, is 400 feet south-southeast of the south corner of the pier; the rock is usually marked with a fishing float. A breakwater, marked by a light, is south of the rock. Fuel is available on the west pier. There is scheduled air service between Ouzinkie and points on Kodiak Island. Radiotelephone and radiotelegraph communications are maintained.

(226) In entering Ouzinkie from the east, care should be taken to avoid the reef that extends some distance off the southeast shore of Prokoda Island. A small general store is in the warehouse at Ouzinkie.

(227) Ouzinkie Point southwest end of Spruce Island, is the point on the north side of the west entrance to Narrow Strait. At the point are cliffs above which a wooded slope rises steeply to a knoll about 110 feet high. The knoll is connected with the land back of it by a low, narrow, grass-covered neck.

(228) Kelp is close to Ouzinkie Point and the point should be given a berth of about 125 yards.

(229) Entrance Point on the south side at the west entrance of Narrow Strait, is grassy with some scattered trees, and a rock 12 feet high is 100 yards off its east side. A kelp-marked shoal, with 7 to 12 feet over it, extends 250 yards north from Entrance Point. A rocky ledge, covered 7 feet and marked at the outer end by a buoy, extends about 325 yards north-northeast of the point.

(230) Neva Cove between Entrance Point and Otmeloi Point, provides good anchorage for medium-size craft from all winds except northwest, in 13 fathoms, soft bottom.

(231) Mariners using Ouzinkie Narrows the narrow passage of Narrow Strait in the vicinity of Otmeloi Point and Prokoda Island, should be careful because the currents will set a vessel into danger rapidly. Depths of 5 fathoms or less extend 200 yards southeast of Prokoda Island, and depths of 4 fathoms or less extend 200 yards north from the small mainland point 0.5 mile east from Otmeloi Point. Between these areas are depths of over 10 fathoms for a width of 150 yards.

(232) The best route through Ouzinkie Narrows from the east is midway between the southeast point of Prokoda Island and the small mainland point to the southeast, thence proceed at midchannel until abreast of Prokoda Island Light 2. From abreast the light to abreast of Ouzinkie Point, the route is practically a straight course that passes between Otmeloi Point and a rock that uncovers about 6 feet. The rock, marked by a daybeacon, is about 275 yards north of Otmeloi Point.

(233) The channel between the rock and a shelving spit with kelp that extends 125 yards from Otmeloi Point has a depth of 7 fathoms and is about 100 yards wide. Vessels usually pass about 80 yards south of the daybeacon to avoid the shelving spit. Mariners should favor the north half of the passage between Entrance Point and Ouzinkie Point, so to pass clear of a 2-fathom ledge which extends 350 yards north of Entrance Point. The ledge is marked by a buoy.

(234) Course Point on the south shore of Narrow Strait, about 2 miles east of Otmeloi Point, is prominent and is marked by a small rocky, grass-covered islet, 150 yards from shore.

(235) A pinnacle rock, 70 feet high, is near the south shore of Narrow Strait about 0.9 mile south-southeast of Course Point. The cove southeast of the pinnacle is foul except for a small area in the center. A 4¼-fathom shoal is 400 yards from the south shore near Azimuth Point .

(236) Termination Point is the east limit of the south shore of Narrow Strait. Foul ground extends nearly 0.5 mile north of the point.

(237) Monashka Bay just east of Termination Point, is clear inside except within 0.3 mile of the shore. Anchorage may be found near the southeast part of the head of the bay, but there is full exposure to northeast weather.

(238) Miller Point on the east side of Monashka Bay entrance, is partly wooded and terminates in a rocky bluff. High, bare rocks extend more than 200 yards off the point, and rocks baring at various stages of the tide are outside of them. The outermost rock is 0.6 mile 040° from Miller Point. The range, consisting of the northeast end of Long Island open north of the outer Hanin Rocks, clears the rocks off Miller Point.

(239) Tidal currents in Narrow Strait are weak except in the west entrance where the velocity is about 1.5 knots. The times of the slacks and strengths may be obtained from the Tidal Current Tables.

(240) Charts 16594, 16593, 16595

(241) Chiniak Bay a 13-mile-wide indentation in the northeast coast of Kodiak Island between Spruce Cape and Cape Chiniak, is the approach to the important commercial port of Kodiak on the north side and a Coast Guard base in Womens Bay on the west side.

(242) Spruce Cape the northwest point of Chiniak Bay and marked by a light, is a low bluff, grass covered on top and backed by woods. Bare rocks and foul ground extend 0.6 mile north from the cape to Hanin Rocks which are two rocks about 30 feet high with an extensive surrounding ledge. Hanin Rock Light (57°50'05"N., 152°18'52"W.), 43 feet above the water, is shown from a skeleton tower on the southwest rock. A reef, mostly bare at low water, extends 250 yards north of Hanin Rocks.

(243) Williams Reef 5 miles east from Spruce Cape, is the outermost danger in the northeast approach to Chiniak Bay. The reef consists of two rocks, 100 yards apart, that uncover at lowest tides; deep water is close-to and breakers generally occur, except near high water with a smooth sea. A lighted whistle buoy is northeast of Williams Reef.

(244) A small patch, covered 3¼ fathoms, is 1.7 miles 285° from Williams Reef.

(245) Hutchinson Reef 0.8 mile northeast of Spruce Cape, is 0.4 mile in extent with a least depth of 1¾ fathoms. A large kelp patch is between the reef and Hanin Rocks. A lighted whistle buoy, 0.4 mile northeast of Hutchinson Reef, marks the west side of the north approach to Kodiak.

(246) Broken ground, 0.9 mile east of Spruce Cape, is covered 4¼ fathoms and marked by a lighted whistle buoy.

(247) On the west side of the channel, 0.4 to 1 mile south of Spruce Cape, are two bare reefs; the outer edges are about 600 yards from shore. The east edge of the south reef is marked by a lighted buoy. Channel Rock on the south reef, is black and 7 feet high amid extensive ledges. Kelp surrounds the reefs and extends south-southwest of Channel Rock, gradually trending toward the shore and joining the shore kelp. Deep water extends close to the edge of the kelp at 150 yards off Channel Rock.

(248) A rock, covered 1½ fathoms, is 0.9 mile southeast from Spruce Cape; it is marked by a lighted whistle buoy.

(249) Woody Island 2 miles south of Spruce Cape, is about 200 feet high and heavily wooded except for a high grass-covered bench at the south end and a small area back of Icehouse Point. Some buildings are conspicuous from west of the point. Just north of Icehouse Point is a 200-foot finger pier with two floats; depths alongside range from 6 to 9 feet. Ruins of an old concrete pier are 75 yards northeast of the present pier; caution is necessary. An aero radiobeacon is on the southeast side of the island.

(250) Anchorage is prohibited in the area between Woody Island and the Kodiak shore as shown on chart 16595.

(251) Foul ground extends 1.3 miles north from the northeast side of Woody Island. A shoal, covered 3¾ fathoms, is 1.5 miles 092° from Woody Island Light.

(252) There are three large white buildings back of Shahafka Cove on the north shore across the channel from Woody Island.

(253) Woody Island Light (57°47'46"N., 152°20'18"W.), 50 feet above the water, is shown from a skeleton tower with a red and white diamond-shaped daymark at the top of the bluff on the west side of the north point of the island. The light marks the east side of the passage between Woody Island and the mainland. The outer limits of foul ground and kelp surrounding the north part of Woody Island are 0.4 mile west and 0.6 mile north-northeast from the light.

(254) A kelp patch of a 4-fathom shoal, marked by a buoy, is 0.35 mile 255° from Woody Island Light. Another kelp patch of a 4-fathom shoal, marked by a lighted bell buoy, is 0.7 mile 265° from the light. The recommended channel is between these shoals.

(255) The group of islands west of Woody Island is surrounded by foul ground. Bird Islet the easternmost of the group, is 68 feet high, small and grass topped; foul ground and kelp extends 550 yards north and 350 yards south of the islet. A 2¼-fathom spot is about 600 yards south-southwest from the southernmost extremity of Bird Islet. Holiday Island west of Bird Islet, is 131 feet high and wooded on its north half. Near Island the largest of the group, is 202 feet high and grass covered. The waterway between Holiday Island and Near Island is a busy seaplane landing and takeoff strip.

(256) The area between the north side of Near Island and the Kodiak shore is shoal and mostly foul, except for the 200-foot-wide dredged channel at the east approach to Kodiak. Cyane Rock 350 yards northeast of Near Island, is awash at lowest tides; a lighted bell buoy marks the rock. The northeast entrance to the dredged channel is between the buoy marking Cyane Rock and the foul ground that extends nearly 200 yards from the bight northwest of the rock.

(257) Long Island the easternmost island in the north end of Chiniak Bay, is 3.5 miles long, 251 feet high, hilly with cliffs at the water and wooded except toward its north end. The northeast end of the island is formed by two grass-covered knolls; the east one is joined to the other by a narrow neck almost covered at high tide. The northwest corner of the island is a prominent vertical bluff more than 100 feet high, rising to a grass-covered knoll 178 feet high. Two prominent pinnacles, 50 feet high, with lower bare rocks nearby, are off the north extremity of the island.

(258) A well-enclosed bay, making in from the west side of Long Island, is accessible to small vessels and affords good shelter and holding ground of mud. An island, just inside the middle of the opening, is connected with the east bay shore by a bar. A black rock, about 6 feet high, is between the island and the south point of the opening. To enter the south part of the bay, steer 179° and pass between the black rock and the south point, slightly favoring the rock and then the west bay shore at the point. Anchor in the center of the basin. Access to the north part of the bay requires local knowledge.

(259) Kodiak Rock covered ¾ fathom, is about halfway between Long Island and Williams Reef. Extensive reefs, partly marked by kelp and having some high bare heads, extend 0.6 to 0.9 mile north from the north shore of Long Island. Shoal spots are between the end of these reefs and Kodiak Rock. Shoal rocky spots, covered 3¾ to 8 fathoms, extend 1.8 miles east of Kodiak Rock; a rock, covered 2½ fathoms, is 1.6 miles west of Kodiak Rock.

(260) The southeast side of Long Island is fringed with rocks and kelp; detached dangers are 0.3 to 0.5 mile from the shore. Refuge Island a small, steep, grass-covered rocky islet, 80 feet high, connected with Long Island by a reef, is off the south extremity of Long Island.

(261) An extensive covered ridge with extremely broken bottom extends north-northeast for 10 miles from the south side of Chiniak Bay. A distinctive submarine valley borders the west side of the ridge; its seaward outlet leads around the north end of the ridge, while the south part leads into Kalsin Bay. The valley forms a deep basin south of Long Island.

(262) The outermost danger on the ridge is a rock, covered 4¼ fathoms, 4.2 miles east from Refuge Island, which breaks in a heavy swell.

(263) Humpback Rock 2.8 miles southeast from Refuge Island, is low and of small extent. Vessels should pass not less than 1 mile north of the rock to avoid the broken ground; a lighted whistle buoy is 0.6 mile northeast of the rock.

(264) Numerous reefs comprise the ridge from Humpback Rock to the south shore. Kalsin Reef 1.8 miles southwest from Humpback Rock, is awash at high water.

(265) Vasilief Rock covered ½ fathom and marked by kelp, is about halfway between the south point of Woody Island and Refuge Island.

(266) Inner Humpback Rock 0.5 mile 170° from the south point of Woody Island, is an 11-foot-high pinnacle; the intervening area is foul. Foul ground extends 600 yards southwest of Inner Humpback Rock.

(267) A detached rocky patch, covered 3 fathoms and marked off its southwest side by a lighted buoy, is 0.6 mile west from the south end of Woody Island.

(268) A rock that uncovers is 0.4 mile southwest of Icehouse Point. A shoal, covered 3½ fathoms, is 600 yards 348° from the point. A rock that uncovers is between the 3½-fathom shoal and Bird Islet. The channel west of Woody Island is marked by buoys.

(269) St. Paul Harbor the west part of Chiniak Bay between Crooked Island on the north and Cliff Point on the south, is fronted with many reefs and islets but affords a south passage to Kodiak.

(270) St. Paul Harbor Entrance Light (57°44'20"N., 152°25'48"W.), 38 feet above the water, is shown from a spindle tower with a red and white diamond-shaped daymark, 0.9 mile north-northeast of Cliff Point; a racon is at the light. A buoyed channel through the reefs is 500 yards north of the light. A lighted whistle buoy marks the approach to the channel.

(271) A 3½-fathom spot and a 4½-fathom spot are about 600 yards west and 900 yards south-southwest, respectively, from the light.

(272) Puffin Island near the center of St. Paul Harbor, is 80 feet high, small, and grass covered. The end of the foul ground, extending 600 yards southwest from the island, is marked by a lighted bell buoy.

(273) The west part of St. Paul Harbor is bordered by dangerous reefs and shoals up to 0.6 mile offshore.

(274) Gull Island 0.5 mile west of Near Island, is 24 feet high and narrow. A shoal extending 350 yards southwest from the south point of the island is marked at the west extremity by a lighted buoy. The foul ground north of the island is marked by a lighted buoy about 260 yards off the north point. More foul ground, marked by a buoy at the outer extremity, extends about 300 yards southeast of the island.

(275) Kodiak is the fifth largest and one of the oldest towns in Alaska; the domes of the old Russian church are conspicuous. Most of the people are employed in the fishing industry.


(277) Weather, Kodiak Vicinity
(278) Kodiak has primarily a marine climate that is exemplified by the limited daily and annual temperature ranges. For instance, the mean annual temperature is about 30°F (-1.1°C). The normal monthly temperature is less than 32°F (0°C) for December through February and 50°F (10°C) or higher, July through September. During the summer, the mean air temperature closely approximates the mean sea surface temperature, rising slightly above it during August but falling below again in September. In winter, the mean maximum air temperature more closely resembles the mean sea surface temperature curve. Because of the proximity of a large landmass to Kodiak, the absolute temperature range is 102°F (about 39°C) regardless of the marine influence. In summer, maximum temperatures will vary 10°F to 20°F (-12.2°C to -6.7°C), depending on whether the northwest gradient is strong enough to maintain a flow of air from over the island or whether it is weak enough that the sea breeze predominates. The highest daily maximum temperatures occur with northwest winds in the summer.

(279) Precipitation is normally abundant throughout the year. Maximums normally occur in September and October with April and July the driest months. All months, however, have a wide variation in the amount of precipitation. The normal annual precipitation is over 65 inches (1651 mm) but ranges from about 38 to 95 inches (965 to 2413 mm). A very high percentage of the precipitation falls during northeast to southeast winds. Small amounts of snow may fall as late as May or as early as September with good ground cover anticipated in November. The mean annual snowfall is about 75 inches (1905 mm) with extremes of 178.1 inches (4523.7 mm) in 1956 and 15.9 inches (403.9 mm) in 1945. Precipitation measurement is often difficult due to strong, gusty surface winds that frequently accompany precipitation. Drifting and blowing snow occasionally close the airfield for periods of up to twenty-four hours.

(280) Although the prevailing winds direction is northwest every month except June and the average speed is about nine knots, these data may be misleading because of the extreme variability in both direction and speed. The maximum gust recorded at the station was 99 knots in January 1950. However, Coast Guard cutters docked in Womens Bay reported williwaw winds off Old Womens Mountain in excess of 120 knots in January 1973. Gusts of over 50 knots have occurred during each month of the year but are most likely to occur in the winter months. An average of eight storms each year brings winds in excess of 55 knots with the average duration of gusts in excess of 55 knots about eight hours per storm.

(281) Prominent features
(282) The north part of Kodiak Island west of Chiniak Bay is mountainous; there are several prominent peaks near the shore. Spruce Cape, Cape Chiniak and the islands overspreading the north part of the bay are comparatively low.

(283) Devils Prongs 2 miles northwest of Kodiak, are three prominent peaks that appear nearly equal in height approaching from southeast; the middle one is flat on top and the north prong is 2,075 feet high and sharp.

(284) Pillar Mountain a short 1,274-foot ridge, rises steeply from the shore back of Kodiak.

(285) Barometer Mountain 5 miles southwest of Kodiak and 2 miles inland from the west shore of Chiniak Bay, is 2,488 feet high and a useful guide in clear weather for the north approach. A notch shows the west side of its summit from north. An aerolight, 1.5 miles east of Barometer Mountain, is 178 feet above the water and useful in the approach to Chiniak Bay when it is not obscured by the islands to the northeast and the mainland to the south.

(286) The gantry crane at the Container Terminal, 1 mile west-southwest of Kodiak, and the landslide just northeast of the terminal are prominent when approaching Kodiak from the south.

(287) Channels
(288) There are three marked approaches to the wharves in Kodiak Harbor. The northerly approach is north of Woody Island and Near Island. The 200-foot-wide dredged channel north of Near Island had a controlling depth of 21.5 feet in 2009. The southerly approach can be taken by transiting south of Long Island, west of Woody Island and north of Near Island. The other option is to transit south of Long Island, southwest of Puffin Island and thence through St. Paul Harbor west of Gull Island.

(289) Anchorages
(290) Inner Anchorage locally known as Winter Anchorage, is 0.4 mile west of Kodiak, 250 to 300 yards off the Kodiak Island shore. In 1985, the City of Kodiak declared that vessels do not anchor within this area due to possible fouling and damage to the waste water discharge lines of the canneries in the vicinity. (Kodiak City Ordinance No. 653, §18.28.190(g) applies.) The mooring buoy in the anchorage, still in use, has capacity for mooring large vessels. Other vessels may anchor just outside the Inner Anchorage, location depending on weather conditions and vessel size; however, never anchor in or near the cable area crossing the narrow passage between Near Island and Kodiak. Anchoring information is available from the harbormaster who monitors 4125 kHz and VHF-FM channels 12, 14 and 16.

(291) A fixed highway bridge with a clearance of 101 feet crosses Kodiak Harbor, connecting Kodiak and Near Island.

(292) Dangers
(293) Chiniak Bay and approaches are full of dangers that must be avoided.

(294) The March 1964 earthquake caused a bottom subsidence of 5.8 feet at Kodiak. Until a complete survey is made of the area, caution is necessary because depths may vary from those charted and mentioned in the Coast Pilot.

(295) Routes
(296) From Northward: In coming from Narrow Strait, pass 1 mile north of Hanin Rock Light, thence east of Hutchinson Reef Lighted Whistle Buoy 4, and then follow the buoyed channel north of Woody and Near Islands to Kodiak Harbor. From Marmot Strait, a 206°course will enter Chiniak Bay east of Hutchinson Reef Lighted Whistle Buoy 4, then follow the buoyed channel to Kodiak Harbor. The routes from north pass over or near a 5½-fathom spot northeast of Spruce Cape that has not been examined with the wire drag.

(297) From Northeastward: Keep north of the line to Spruce Island summit bearing 294° until the cliffs near the southwest end of Long Island are well open west of the sheer cliff at its northwest corner. Then steer 241° for about 4 miles with Barometer Mountain ahead and Spruce Cape slightly to the right. This course passes east of Hutchinson Reef Lighted Whistle Buoy 4, thence through the buoyed channel to Kodiak Harbor.

(298) The north approach to Kodiak Harbor is not difficult in clear weather but is dangerous at night or in thick weather. Exercise care to avoid Williams Reef and the other dangers in the entrance. Depths are irregular in the approach so that surroundings cannot be relied upon as a guide to the entrance or to avoid danger.

(299) The narrow passage north of Near Island leading to Kodiak Harbor requires careful piloting: strangers should not attempt it without thorough knowledge of the dangers and tide and current conditions.

(300) From Eastward and Southward: Enter Chiniak Bay north of Humpback Rock Lighted Whistle Buoy 1, then follow the buoyed channel through the reefs north of St. Paul Harbor Entrance Light and St. Paul Harbor to Kodiak Harbor. If it is desired to approach Kodiak Harbor through the narrows north of Near Island, use the buoyed channel west of Woody Island after entering Chiniak Bay north of Humpback Rock. Exercise caution to avoid Inner Humpback Rock and the dangers southwest of it.

(301) In approaching Chiniak Bay, the bank with a least depth of 4¼ fathoms, 3.5 miles southeast of Long Island, and the reefs extending from Humpback Rock southwest to the mainland should be avoided.

(302) Currents
(303) In Chiniak Bay, the flood current sets northeast and the ebb current southwest with considerable velocity in places around the islands. In the north entrance, the tidal currents have a velocity of 2 to 3 knots during the strength of the larger tides. They turn sharply around Spruce Cape and across the reefs north of it.

(304) In the narrows off Kodiak, the current velocity is about 0.9 knot. The flood sets northeast. (See the Tidal Current Tables for predictions.)

(305) Pilotage, Kodiak Harbor
(306) Pilotage, except for certain exempted vessels, is compulsory for all vessels navigating the inside waters of the State of Alaska.

(307) The Kodiak Island area is served by the Southwest Alaska Pilots Association. (See Pilotage, General Chapter 3, for the pilot pickup stations and other details.)

(308) Vessels en route to Kodiak or Womens Bay can contact the pilot boat by calling “KODIAK PILOT BOAT” or “BRIAN T” on VHF-FM channel 16 or on a prearranged frequency between pilot and agent/vessel.

(309) Quarantine, customs, immigration and agriculture quarantine
(310) (See Chapter 3, Vessel Arrival Inspection, and Appendix A for addresses.)

(311) Quarantine is enforced in accordance with regulations of the U.S. Public Health Service. (See Public Health Service, Chapter 1.)

(312) Kodiak is a customs port of entry.

(313) Coast Guard Base Support Unit Kodiak is in Womens Bay, 5 miles southwest of Kodiak. It is described later in this chapter. Coast Guard Air Station Kodiak is located at the Base Support Unit.

(314) Wharves
(315) The waterfront facilities at Kodiak consist of three deep-draft municipal wharves, administered by a Port Director; a small-boat harbor, administered by a harbormaster; and many private wharves used mostly by the fishing industry.

(316) Kodiak City Pier 3, Container Terminal: (57°46'53"N., 152°26'09"W.): a wharf 1 mile southwest of Kodiak; 490-foot face; 880 feet of berthing space with dolphins; 38 feet alongside; deck height, 19 feet; one 27½-ton gantry crane; receipt and shipment of containerized cargo and automobiles; mooring cruise ships, fishing vessels and other vessels; storage space for 375 containers; owned by the City of Kodiak and operated by Horizon Lines.

(317) There is a heavy surge at the Container Terminal during and after southwest through southeast gales.

(318) Kodiak City Pier 2, Container Terminal: a wharf 0.4 mile northeast of City Pier 3, contiguous with Fisherman’s Wharf; 760-foot face; 910 feet total berthing space; 38 feet alongside; deck height, 19 feet; handling supplies and equipment for fishing vessels; and mooring cruise ships, fishing vessels and other vessels; owned by the City of Kodiak and operated by Horizon Lines; the Port Director’s office is on this wharf.

(319) Union Oil Pier: a T-pier just northeast of the Kodiak City Pier 2, Cargo Terminal; 125-foot face, 180 feet total berthing space; 35 feet alongside; deck heights, 18 feet; receipt of petroleum products; bunkering vessels; 30-foot floating pier adjacent; gasoline, diesel fuel and water are available; pipelines extend from wharf to storage tanks in rear, total capacity 35,700 barrels; owned by Union Oil Co. of California and operated by Kodiak Oil Sales, Inc.

(320) There are many cannery wharves from the Union Oil Pier northeast to the small-boat harbor.

(321) St. Paul Harbor a small craft harbor just southwest of downtown Kodiak, is protected by two breakwaters. A light marks the outer end of the west breakwater. In 2009, depths of 5 to 12 feet were available in the basin. The basin has berthing space for 250 vessels; contact the harbor office (907–486–8080) for berthing assignments. Electricity and water are available at the floats. Two wharves, a boat grid and a launching ramp are available. The basin is owned and operated by the City.

(322) Star of Kodiak Wharf: East of the small-boat harbor; 275 feet of berthing space, 30 feet alongside; deck height, 20 feet, receipt of seafood; owned and operated by Trident Seafoods Corp.

(323) The STAR OF KODIAK, a grounded 430-foot ship, is used as a seafood processing plant and cannery.

(324) Alaska State Ferry Terminal, City Pier No. 1: a wharf just northeast of the STAR OF KODIAK; 204-foot face; 28 feet alongside; deck height, 19 feet; landing for passenger and vehicular ferry; receipt of petroleum products; fueling vessels; handling supplies and equipment for fishing vessels; pipelines extend from wharf to storage tanks in rear, total capacity 42,400 barrels; owned by the City of Kodiak and operated by the state and Petro Marine Services.

(325) Vessels moored at the Ferry Terminal must be attended by a crew member at all times and be capable of moving on notice. No vessel may moor at the wharf when the amber light on top of the terminal building is flashing.

(326) City of Kodiak, Transient Float: 200 yards east of the Ferry Terminal; 425 feet of berthing space; 28 to 30 feet alongside; mooring transient vessels; owned and operated by the City of Kodiak.

(327) Berthing assignments at the transient float are made by the harbormaster; his office is on the northeast side of the small-boat harbor.

(328) There are more private commercial wharves northeast of the transient float for a distance of about 700 yards.

(329) St. Herman Harbor a small boat harbor near the head of St. Herman Bay known locally as Dog Bay, is between Uski Island and Near Island. The harbor has a north and south entrance, both marked by lights. The south entrance is protected by two breakwaters. In 2009, the controlling depth was 1¾ fathoms in the north entrance channel and 3¼ fathoms in the south entrance channel. The basin has space for 325 vessels.

(330) The National Marine Fisheries has a pier and Ocean Beauty Seafoods has a wharf in Gibson Cove, 1.3 miles southwest of Kodiak. There is a heavy surge in the cove during northeast through southeast gales. The entrance to the cove is foul, with rocks on either side.

(331) Supplies
(332) Marine supplies and provisions are available in limited quantities. Water, gasoline and diesel fuel are available at North Pacific Fuel and Petro Marine Services at the Ferry Terminal and just east of the Ferry Terminal.

(333) Repairs
(334) General repairs can be made by local machine, electronic and welding shops.

(335) Communications
(336) Freight vessels call weekly. Alaska Marine Highway System has ferry service to Seward, Seldovia, Homer, Dutch Harbor and connecting ports. Air transportation is frequent daily to Anchorage and once daily to Seattle from Kodiak State Airport, which is about 5 miles southwest of town. Charter air services are available at Kodiak Municipal Airport in town.

(337) Telephone, radiotelephone and radiotelegraph communications are maintained.

(338) Chart 16596

(339) Womens Bay southwest of St. Paul Harbor at the extreme west end of Chiniak Bay, is the site of the Coast Guard Base Support Unit.

(340) Womens Bay is frequently blocked by ice in midwinter and vessels may experience high wind coming off of Old Womens Mountain. The area routinely experiences storms with winds in excess of 55 knots during the winter months.

(341) Naval Defensive Sea Area and Airspace Reservation
(342) Under the authority of Executive Orders 8717 of March 22, 1941, 8597 of November 18, 1940 and 9720 of May 8, 1946, the area in and about Womens Bay is a designated Naval Defensive Sea Area and Airspace Reservation. Restrictions imposed under the authority of the above executive orders have been suspended subject to reinstatement without notice at any time that the interests of national defense may require such action.

(343) Channels
(344) The entrance to Womens Bay is obstructed by numerous and extensive rocks and reefs; some are awash at extreme low water while others are up to 6 feet high. A 400-foot-wide channel passes through this foul area northwest of Zaimka Island to deeper water inside. The channel is marked by lighted and unlighted buoys and a 211.1° lighted range. In 2008, a depth of 28 feet was available in the channel.

(345) In the winter, buoys are often moved off station due to ice floes.

(346) Cliff Point on the south side of the entrance to Womens Bay, is the end of a prominent 192-foot-high headland that is covered with grass and scattered brush; two prominent pinnacle rocks are among the reefs east of the point. Broken ground and rocks extend about 0.5 mile northeast of the point. Cliff Island 0.3 mile north of Cliff Point, is small and 62 feet high with steep cliffs on all but the southeast side; pinnacle rocks are on the northeast and south sides.

(347) Zaimka Island the largest of the islands at the entrance to Womens Bay, is 151 feet high, bordered with cliffs and covered with bushes and grass. Blodgett Island 0.7 mile southwest of Zaimka Island, is 70 feet high.

(348) Nyman Peninsula on the west side of the entrance to Womens Bay, forms a protected inner bay. Nyman Spit a submerged sandspit, extends about 800 yards southeast from the south end of the peninsula; a lighted buoy marks its outer end.

(349) Currents
(350) In the outer part of Womens Bay, the currents follow the general direction of the channel, flowing SW on the flood and northeast on the ebb with a velocity of about 1 knot. An eddy has been reported north of Blodgett Island that will set a vessel to the south at the strength of an ebb current; this should be guarded against. Also, the ebb current flows northeast across Nyman Spit. Ships passing near the spit at such a time might experience a set onto it. There are marked eddies near Frye Point at the west end of Womens Bay. Although deep water is close to this point, ships should guard against passing too close to it.

(351) Routes
(352) Vessels entering Womens Bay may approach from northeast through Woody Island Channel and north of St. Paul Harbor Entrance Light, thence follow the marked channel southwest into Womens Bay. From east and south, the approach is the same as that for the south approach to Kodiak until St. Paul Harbor Entrance Light is passed, then follow the dredged channel into the bay. Special note should be taken of Nyman Spit, which extends 700 yards southeast of Nyman Peninsula and is marked by a lighted buoy.

(353) Large vessels are strongly recommended not to navigate the channel to or from Womens Bay and between the shoal waters of St. Paul Harbor entrance after dark or during low visibility unless a qualified pilot is on board or the master assumes full risk. It is also not recommended for vessels to enter or depart from Womens Bay and between the shoal waters of St. Paul Harbor during periods of wind velocities of 35 knots or more, except in emergencies or extreme necessities.

(354) Caution
(355) Vessels with a masthead height of 138 feet or more are in danger when entering or exiting Kodiak/St. Paul Harbor when the Kodiak Airport/Kodiak Coast Guard Air Station is using Runway 25 during low visibility landings/arrivals (see the Alert Area on charts 16595 and 16596). Mariners are strongly urged to contact the Federal Aviation Administration Anchorage Air Route Traffic Control Center at 907–269–1103 to alert air traffic of their presence approximately 30 minutes before transiting the channels.

(356) Wharves
(357) The Coast Guard’s waterfront facilities are in Womens Bay on the northwest side of Nyman Peninsula. They consist of two deep-draft piers. Marginal Pier, about 600 yards long along the southwest shoreline of Nyman Peninsula, is in disrepair and not used. The Coast Guard facilities are used only by U.S. Government vessels and commercial vessels handling military cargoes. Mooring spaces are assigned by the Port Services Office, Coast Integrated Support Command Kodiak.

(358) Coast Guard Fuel Pier: 900 yards north of the southernmost tip of Nyman Peninsula; 570 feet long; deck height, 18 feet; water, electricity and fuel for government vessels are available. Alongside depths are deeper on the north side of the pier.

(359) Coast Guard Cargo Wharf: 500 yards north-northeast of the Coast Guard Fuel Pier; 1,088-foot face; 28 feet alongside; deck height, 18 feet; 5 berths available for government vessels; water and electricity are available; receipt of military cargo. A small-craft floating dock is alongside the southeast face of the pier between the pier and shore.

(360) Seaport Terminal Services Wharf: about 500 yards northwest of the Coast Guard Cargo Pier; 1,200-foot face; 15 to 30 feet alongside; deck height, 14 feet; cranes to 150 tons; receipt and shipment of conventional general cargo; handling supplies and equipment for fishing vessels; and mooring vessels; owned by LASH Corp. and operated by Seaport Terminal Services, Inc.

(361) Local magnetic disturbance
(362) Differences of as much as 20° to 40° from the normal variation have been observed just off the Coast Guard Cargo Pier.

(363) Chart 16593

(364) Middle Bay between Cliff Point and Broad Point, is exposed to northeast weather. Viesoki Island near midentrance, is 101 feet high, small, and flat topped with sheer rock bluffs. A rock that uncovers is 0.4 mile northeast from the island.

(365) Broad Point is the end of a long peninsula separating Middle Bay from Kalsin Bay. Broken ground with some dangers extends 1 mile north from the point.

(366) Kalsin Bay the largest indentation in the southwest side of Chiniak Bay, provides anchorage for large and small vessels. The low valley between Kalsin Bay and Ugak Bay, 9 miles southwest, is used as a portage.

(367) Queer Island Kalsin Island and other small islands in the west part of the entrance to Kalsin Bay are surrounded by foul ground. A large expanse of reefs and small islands overspreads the east part of the bay.

(368) The foul ground can be avoided by entering Kalsin Bay 0.8 mile southeast of Queer Island, then favoring the west shore. The recommended anchorage is 2 miles from the head about 0.5 mile off the east shore in 9 to 10 fathoms; this anchorage may be untenable during a northeast storm. Caution is necessary to avoid the rock that uncovers 9 feet on the west side of the bay and the rock that uncovers 4 feet on the east side of the bay.

(369) A well-defined channel along the east shore of Kalsin Bay leads to a V-shaped cove southeast of Svitlak Island where excellent anchorage for small vessels is afforded in any weather.

(370) Routes
(371) To reach the V-shaped cove southeast of Svitlak Island from a position 1.2 miles 000° from Cape Chiniak Light, steer 267° heading for Kekur Island with Middle Island summit on range, until the sharp point on the west end of Isthmus Bay bears 191°. Then turn left to course 240° and head for Utesistoi Island south of Svitlak Island, until abeam of the north end of Svitlak Island. Then turn left to 220° and head for the point at the south entrance of the cove until Utesistoi Island bears four points on the starboard bow. Then steer 180°and anchor in 6½ to 7 fathoms 400 yards off the south shore. To go farther into the cove requires local knowledge. The channel abreast Svitlak Island is narrow with shoal water on both sides; caution should be exercised to avoid depths of less than 10 fathoms. The shoal water on the east side of the channel is extensive and surrounds the point forming the north limit of the cove.

(372) Isthmus Bay just east of Kalsin Bay, affords anchorage for vessels in south weather. The range of Kekur Island and the summit of Middle Island, course 267° clears the dangers off the east end of Isthmus Bay. In an emergency, a vessel may be beached on the sand at the head of the bay.

(373) Chart 16580

(374) Kodiak Island southeast coast: A comprehensive survey was made of the waters along the southeast coast of Kodiak Island to and including part of Albatross Bank. A vessel equipped with echo sounding apparatus would be aided in determining its position by soundings taken while cruising over this area.

(375) The shoaler, outer parts of two extensive submarine plateaus form Albatross Bank. A trough of deep water lies between them and branches extend into both entrances of Sitkalidak Strait and toward Sitkinak Strait. A very regular trough, northeast of Albatross Bank, leads directly from seaward to Chiniak Bay.

(376) A depth of 8 fathoms, rocky bottom, is in 56°22.5'N., 152°56.0'W. on Albatross Bank.

(377) Chart 16593

(378) Cape Chiniak the southeast point of Chiniak Bay, is low and wooded for 0.8 mile back and then rises to higher land. Chiniak Island 0.5 mile northeast of the cape, is flat and grass covered; numerous high bare rocks extend 1.1 miles northeast from it. Cape Chiniak Light (57°37'41"N., 152°09'12"W.), 120 feet above the water, is shown from a skeleton tower with a diamond-shaped red and white daymark on the northwest side of the island. An anchorage, 1.3 miles northwest of Cape Chiniak Light, provides protection from south weather in 18 to 20 fathoms. The cape should be cleared by 1.5 miles to avoid the offshore rocks.

(379) Cape Greville 2 miles south of Cape Chiniak, is fronted by several rocky islets. Broken bottom extends 0.8 mile northeast from the cape. In approaching from the vicinity of Ugak Island, Cape Greville should not be mistaken for Cape Chiniak.

(380) The land is thickly wooded for about 5 miles south from Cape Chiniak, then to Narrow Cape it is bare except for scrubby brush in the gulches and valleys and some grass and scattered clumps of small spruce trees on the lower slopes. The valley, 8 miles south of Cape Chiniak, terminates in a sand beach.

(381) Submerged rocks and rocks awash extend up to 0.5 mile offshore for 8 miles south from Cape Chiniak, then they extend up to 1 mile offshore to Narrow Cape; there is thick kelp in the vicinity of Narrow Cape. Outside these areas the bottom is mostly sand and gravel with some rocky sections off the points. No anchorages are recommended along this coast.

(382) A 10½ fathom bank is 8.3 miles 166° from Cape Greville.

(383) Narrow Cape 13 miles south from Cape Chiniak, is flat but gradually drops close to sea level about 0.3 mile back of the cliff, having the appearance of an island when seen off Cape Chiniak. From this low part, grassy slopes with a few scattered spruce trees roll gradually upward to the mountains north of Ugak Bay. The southeast face of the cape is an abrupt grass ½ topped cliff, 165 feet high and 1.1 miles long.

(384) A rocket launch facility is located at Narrow Cape. Safety zones are established by the USCG COTP for the safety of vessels operating near Narrow Cape during launch activity. These safety zones are closed to vessel traffic during the hours of anticipated launches and are announced in the Local Notice to Mariners and Broadcast Notice to Mariners. Inquiries should be directed to USCG MSD Kodiak, AK 907-486-5918 or Sector Anchorage, AK 907-428-4200 for specific details.

(385) Ugak Island 2.5 miles off Narrow Cape, is discernible against the distant background of higher mountains from well out to sea. A ridge over 1,000 feet high runs the full length of the island close to the offshore side. The shore is steep and rocky and fringed with rocks and reefs, except at the northwest end where a grassy slope spotted with a few scattered spruces descends gradually to a sandspit.

(386) In 1984, a submerged obstruction was reported about 1.2 miles south of Ugak Island in about 57°20'51"N., 152°16'39"W.

(387) A rock and sandbar extends from Ugak Island to the south tip of Narrow Cape; the least found depth near the middle is 6½ fathoms. The passage is considered safe for moderate-sized vessels. It is regularly used by fishing boats of 8½- to 10½-foot drafts. Tide rips are experienced, particularly on and near the bar, except at slack water. These rips increase with strong northeast winds, producing breakers and causing the false impression that the passage is foul. At such times the passage is dangerous for small craft.

(388) The current floods northeast through the passage between Ugak Island and Narrow Cape. There are strong cross currents north and south of Ugak Island and tide rips near the shore.

(389) If the passage south of Narrow Cape is used to Ugak Bay, avoid the rock awash at minus tides 0.7 mile southwest of the south tip of Narrow Cape, a rocky 4½-fathom shoal 3.6 miles west of the cape and a ½-fathom rock 6.6 miles west of the cape.

(390) Ugak Bay has its entrance between Pasagshak and Gull Points and extends west about 19 miles; its inner end branches into a basin at the north and a narrow arm at the south. In entering, vessels should pass south of the ½-fathom rock a little north of midentrance. Depths of 40 to 55 fathoms will be found 1 mile off the points along the south shore from the entrance to Saltery Cove, then the bottom abruptly shoals to about 16 fathoms and deepens again to about 45 fathoms near the junction of the basin and arm at the head of the bay.

(391) Local magnetic disturbances
(392) Magnetic boat compasses have been observed to swing 15° to 180° in Ugak Bay.

(393) Pasagshak Point 4 miles west of Narrow Cape, is a prominent, narrow mountainous headland 894 feet high. The point presents the appearance of a pyramid when viewed from the southwest.

(394) Pasagshak Bay is rectangular shaped, 1 mile wide at its entrance and has its east side formed by Pasagshak Point. It is shallow a short distance inside and exposed to any existing swell.

(395) Long Island the 127-foot-high island off the north shore of Ugak Bay west of Pasagshak Bay, is rocky and grass topped. It is surrounded by a reef and numerous rocky islets. Foul ground is between the island and the north shore and 1.2 miles southeast of the island.

(396) Portage Bay is the rounded bight 4.5 miles west of Pasagshak Bay. This bay is identified by a small flat-topped, sheer-bluff islet 42 feet high in the middle of the entrance and a pinnacle rock 34 feet high 270 yards southwest from it. Both are surrounded by deep water. The bottom has a gentle slope toward the head of the bay.

(397) Eagle Harbor is an open cove on the south side of Ugak Bay, 5.5 miles from the entrance. Its northwest point is marked by two pinnacle rocks. At the northwest shore of the cove are several shacks of the deserted village of Eagle Harbor. There is no secure anchorage here. The cove is exposed to east swells.

(398) Between Portage Bay and Kalsin Bay and between Eagle Harbor and Shearwater Bay are portages.

(399) Saltery Cove on the north shore of Ugak Bay and 8.5 miles above the entrance, is a half-moon-shaped bight. It is marked on its east extremity by a reef point surmounted by a pinnacle rock 32 feet high. The cove has a gently sloping sand and mud bottom but shoals abruptly to flats along the shore. A rock is just outside of the flats near the head of the cove. The recommended anchorage is along the 10-fathom curve near the east end of the bight. This is regarded as the best general anchorage in Ugak Bay.

(400) Hidden Basin the north branch at the head of Ugak Bay, has a slightly curving bottle-neck entrance. The controlling depth through the approach is only 5 feet. The channel is along the west shore of the approach. Strong currents are encountered in the entrance. Depths charted in the approach to the basin are reported to be inaccurate; this and the swift and turbulent current during periods of maximum and minimum flood make the entrance hazardous.

(401) The south branch at the head of Ugak Bay is about 7 miles long and about 0.5 mile wide. A rock, which bares 5½ feet at about half tide, is near the middle of the constricted part of the arm. The channel is south of the rock, which may be avoided by keeping 200 yards off the south shore in 10 fathoms.

(402) Gull Point and the point 1.8 miles south have bold rocky faces with islets of massive rock close by. The small cove on the south shore of Ugak Bay west of Gull Point provides anchorage for small boats in south weather. A sand beach is at the head.

(403) The cove about 3 miles south of Gull Point is connected by a tidal channel to a marsh which is flooded at high tide. The bottom at the entrance to the lagoon and along the beach for about 1 mile north is sandy and apparently free from rocks. A rock, covered 2½ fathoms, is 0.8 mile northeast from the rocky point at the south end of the cove.

(404) Chart 16592

(405) Dangerous Cape on the southeast coast of Kodiak Island between Ugak and Kiliuda Bays, is the south end of a ridge. On the south side of the cape is a bluff over 500 feet high. A large rock, about 30 feet high, is about 400 yards south of the cape.

(406) Boulder Bay just west of Dangerous Cape, affords poor anchorage on hard sand bottom. There are numerous rocks several hundred yards offshore. These rocks are mostly submerged or awash at high water, and extreme care should be taken in navigating this bay.

(407) Inner and Outer Right Capes form a double cape 3.5 to 5 miles southwest of Dangerous Cape. Outer Right Cape is comparatively low with eroded bluffs about 100 feet high; however, landslides extend almost to the summit of the mountains along the coast 1 mile northeast of the outer cape. On a clear day these are recognized a long distance offshore. Inner Right Cape rises to 493 feet. Broken ground extends about 1 mile offshore between the outer and inner capes.

(408) Kiliuda Bay has its entrance between Left Cape and Inner Right Cape. It extends about 4 miles northwest and then about 6 miles west.

(409) Indenting the northeast side of Kiliuda Bay are Santa Flavia Bay and Shearwater Bay. The shore between these bays is fringed with islands and rocks.

(410) Kiliuda Rock 2 feet high and about 1 mile west of Inner Right Cape, is on the range of the tangents of Inner and Outer Right Capes and about on the range of the small points along the west shore of Santa Flavia Bay. The rock is surrounded close-to by depths of 17 fathoms.

(411) Santa Flavia Bay between Inner Right Cape and Ermine Point, is apparently clear in the center with depths of 12 to 15 fathoms, sand bottom, but is exposed to swells and seas accompanying southeast weather. Kiliuda Rock should be avoided in entering.

(412) Shearwater Bay the northeast arm of Kiliuda Bay, is about 2.5 miles in extent. Rocks awash extend from either side of the entrance. In the entrance channel between the rocks there are depths greater than 20 fathoms for a width of 0.4 mile. The rocks extending 0.2 mile west of Pillar Point bare at low stages of the tide, and shoal water extends about 200 yards channelward from the outermost rock. Near the outer end of the group of rocks on the northwest side of the entrance is a dry patch of rock 3 feet high. The outermost rock uncovers and is 300 yards from the dry patch in a direction toward the head of the bay.

(413) Pillar Point marks the southeast side of the entrance to Shearwater Bay. A small islet is about 110 yards north of Pillar Point. Bluff Point 0.5 mile farther inside the bay, is marked by the eroding bluff of a knoll that overlooks the lowland back of Pillar Point.

(414) The small enclosure, back of the narrow strip of land at Bluff Point, provides secure shelter for small craft with local knowledge.

(415) About 0.7 miles from its head, Shearwater Bay contracts to a width of about 0.4 mile between Observation Point and the opposing point on the southeast side. The ruins of a cannery are on Observation Point. Anchorage may be had about 0.3 mile beyond this contraction midway between the shores in about 6 fathoms, mud bottom, avoiding shoal water extending 200 yards north of the opposing point and the shoal depths adjacent to the flats along the northwest side at the head of the bay.

(416) Routes
(417) Routes, Shearwater Bay from the southwestward: Round Cape Barnabas 2 miles off and make good the following courses: (1) 331° for 9.5 miles to Pillar Point bearing 069° 1.4 miles; this course passes 1.1 miles off Left Cape and heads for Shearwater Point. (2) 048° for 1.4 miles to Pillar Point abeam, 0.5 mile; this course heads for the deteriorating cannery wharf at Observation Point. (3) 056° for 1.6 miles to anchorage.

(418) From the northeastward: Round Dangerous Cape 3.5 miles and make good the following courses: (1) 276° for 3.5 miles to Outer Right Cape (east end) bearing 000° 2.5 miles. (2) 305° for 3.4 miles to Inner Right Cape bearing 052° 1.6 miles; this course heads for the tangent of the bold shore about 2 miles northwest of Left Cape. (3) 330° for 3.8 miles to Pillar Point bearing 069° 1.4 miles; this course heads for Shearwater Point. Then follow courses (2) and (3) of the preceding paragraph.

(419) The north side of Kiliuda Bay is indented by an open bay about 1.2 miles wide between Shearwater Point and Coxcomb Point. Foul ground extends 0.3 mile from Shearwater Point to Coxcomb Point. A rock, 4 feet high, is 0.5 mile east of Coxcomb Point. The entrance channel is 200 yards east of this rock. A north course leads to the center of the open bay, which has a depth of 3 fathoms. The bottom has a gentle rise to an extensive sand beach at the head. A vessel may be beached here in the event of an emergency.

(420) A rock, 45 feet high and 0.5 mile southwest from Coxcomb Point, marks the outer limit of shallow depths. A triangular-shaped bank is outside the line drawn from the rock to Shearwater Point and north of Pivot Point. Anchorage depths on the bank are 14 to 17 fathoms, sand bottom.

(421) The point on the north side of Kiliuda Bay, about 3 miles to the west of Coxcomb Point, is a low grass-covered sandspit. The axis of a channel of deep water is 300 yards from the sandspit, and the 40-fathom curve is only 150 yards from the spit. Just south of this channel the depths are very irregular and the area should be avoided.

(422) Left Cape is a bold headland separating Kiliuda Bay from the east part of Sitkalidak Strait. The southeast face of the cape is covered with a series of long rockslides extending almost to the mountain summit back of the cape. Numerous boulders are close inshore, and submerged rocks fringe the cape.

(423) Sitkalidak Island about 18 miles long, is adjacent to the southeast coast of Kodiak Island. The island is grass covered and in general devoid of trees. The easternmost mountain summit at Cape Barnabas is a good landmark from the east and southeast.

(424) Sitkalidak Strait borders both the north and west sides of Sitkalidak Island, separating that island from Kodiak Island. Sitkalidak Passage is the name applied to the narrow part of the strait.

(425) That part of Sitkalidak Strait north of the Sitkalidak Island extends from the east entrance between Dangerous Cape and Cape Barnabas to Sitkalidak Passage. The broken bottom northeast of Barnabas Rock has been surveyed and no dangers were revealed. This part of the strait is navigable by all vessels as far as Sheep Island and offers several secure anchorages. The controlling depth through Sitkalidak Passage is 7 feet. The passage and its east approach are marked by lights and a lighted buoy.

(426) During June and July thick fogs occur around the south end of Kodiak Island that sometimes last for several days. These fogs generally drift about the sea but frequently do not enter the strait and adjacent bays. The east entrance to Sitkalidak Strait is frequently clear when a thick fog is less than 1 mile offshore.

(427) Cape Barnabas the east end of Sitkalidak Island, is marked by a conspicuous mountain 1,719 feet high. There are rockslides on the slopes of this mountain and a series of eroded bluffs along the northeast face. Submerged rocks and rocks above high water border around the cape and numerous kelp patches are several hundred yards offshore. In thick weather this cape is usually easier to pick up than Dangerous Cape.

(428) Vessels making Sitkalidak Strait from the southeast should pass Cape Barnabas 2 miles off and steer 321° heading for the northeast tangent of Left Cape until Table Island Light bears 195° then change course to 252° and follow directions given below.

(429) Barnabas Rock which uncovers about 3 feet, is 0.8 mile 075° from Table Island. The sea breaks over this rock at high tide when there is a moderate swell, but often in calm weather at high tide there is no indication of the rock. It has no kelp. The passage between the rock and Table Island is apparently clear and has been used by steam whalers operating from Port Hobron; but because of uncertain currents the passage is not recommended. The water between Table Island and Sitkalidak Island is foul with submerged pinnacles.

(430) Table Island is a flat-topped island about 100 feet high 2 miles west-northwest from Cape Barnabas. Table Island Light (57°11'20"N., 152°55'13"W.), 106 feet above the water, is shown from a small house with a red and white diamond-shaped daymark on the north end of the island.

(431) Tanginak Anchorage the bight east of the entrance to McDonald Lagoon, is a good anchorage in south weather. A rock awash at low water is about 0.5 mile off the eroded bluff forming the west end of the bight. Shoal water is between the rock and the point.

(432) McDonald Lagoon about 4.5 miles west of Table Island, almost divides Sitkalidak Island. It has a bottleneck entrance. A bar channel, 13 feet deep, is west of the ½-fathom shoal 0.2 miles northwest of the bottleneck and follows the north side of the west entrance point until about 200 yards west of the bottleneck; here it is necessary to avoid a small shoal making out from the north side of the point. Strong currents run in the entrance and in north weather the bar breaks all the way across. Small vessels with local knowledge may enter the lagoon which deepens inside and has good holding ground.

(433) Port Hobron is the second deep-indenting bay along the north side of Sitkalidak Island west of Table Island. The bay is a good harbor for all vessels except during a northeast gale, when a comparatively heavy sea enters the bay.

(434) A former whaling station and wharf in ruins are on the east side of Port Hobron.

(435) At the head of Port Hobron is a small settlement known as McCord. A cattle ranch is on the east shore.

(436) Cathedral Island the largest island in Sitkalidak Strait, is in the middle of the strait at the entrance to Port Hobron. The island is 192 feet high and covered with grass. It is dome shaped, with steep eroded cliffs on all sides except on the south side. The best water is found passing south of the island.

(437) Nut Island Light (57°12'13"N., 153°09'35"W.), 40 feet above the water, is shown from a square steel frame with a red and green triangular daymark 0.9 mile west from Cathedral Island.

(438) Aberdeen Rock in the middle of Sitkalidak Strait 0.7 mile west of Nut Island, is covered 1 fathom. It is unmarked and breakers occur over it only in the heaviest northeast weather at extreme low tide.

(439) The recommended passage in the vicinity of the three midstrait obstructions, Cathedral Island, Nut Island and Aberdeen Rock, is to the south of them. To avoid Aberdeen Rock when using the passage and when in the vicinity of the rock, do not go north of the line between Nut Island Light and Bush Point Light 2. The passage north of the three midstrait obstructions is clear and is used by local craft. Three Sisters Rocks near the north shore, are low; after passing south of these when bound west in the north passage, care must be taken to stand well over toward the north shore in the vicinity of Aberdeen Rock.

(440) Amee Bay 2 miles west of Port Hobron, is clear in midchannel and offers fair anchorage, but violent williwaws blow out of this bay in south weather.

(441) Shag Rock 6 feet high, is about 150 yards north of Cub Island which in turn is about 2.4 miles west of Cathedral Island. Shag Rock forms an important turning point for vessels using the narrow parts of Sitkalidak Strait. It is reported that on the rising tide a south set is noticeable between Shag Rock and Bush Point.

(442) Bush Point is on the north shore of the narrow part of Sitkalidak Strait 2.8 miles west of Cathedral Island. Bush Point Light 2 (57°13'04"N., 153°13'01"W.), 20 feet above the water, is shown from a skeleton tower with a red triangular daymark on the south extremity of the point.

(443) Midway Bay known locally as Sheep Bay is that part of Sitkalidak Strait between the narrows at Bush Point and Sitkalidak Passage. Sheep Island 50 feet high, covers the central part of Midway Bay. The bay affords the best anchorage in the general vicinity of the strait. The recommended anchorage for large vessels is between Sheep Island and Bush Point; small vessels usually anchor northeast of Sheep Island in 5 fathoms, sticky bottom.

(444) The through passage is south of Sheep Island. A shoal bar, strewn with boulders, extends west from the shoal area surrounding Sheep Island to the east end of the north shore of Sitkalidak Passage. The channel for entering Sitkalidak Passage borders the south side of the shoal area and bar. The shoal on the south side of this channel is marked by a lighted buoy. In 1993, a visible wreck was reported to be just north of the channel about 500 yards northwest of the buoy.

(445) Sitkalidak Passage separates the north end of Sitkalidak Island from Kodiak Island and is the link between the two sections of Sitkalidak Strait. The controlling depth is only 7 feet through the passage. The passage is fairly straight and about 1 mile long. Inside the east entrance the channel slightly favors the north shore; in the west half of the passage it slightly favors the south shore.

(446) Sitkalidak Passage Light 4 (57°12'33"N., 153°16'33"W.), 30 feet above the water, is shown from a skeleton tower with a red triangular daymark on the north side of the west end of the passage.

(447) Currents
(448) The currents seem to meet at Sitkalidak Passage under ordinary conditions of wind and weather, but in strong south weather the current occasionally flows northeast continuously. No current velocities have been measured, but it is estimated that the maximum velocity never exceeds 3 knots.

(449) Routes
(450) From eastward, enter Sitkalidak Strait on a midchannel course. Proceed to 0.5 mile 163° from the east end of Cathedral Island, thence 600 yards south of Nut Island Light, thence 300 yards south of Aberdeen Rock, thence 150 yards north of Shag Rock, thence 175 yards south of Bush Point Light 2, thence 400 yards 155° from the west end of Sheep Island, thence 200 yards northeast of Sheep Island Light 3, and leave Light 3 to port. From this point, make a slow left turn to enter the narrows, avoiding the shoals west of Sheep Island. Keep in midchannel through Sitkalidak Passage, favoring the southeast side opposite Sitkalidak Passage Light 4. Continue on a midchannel course through the southwest end of the strait.

(451) Outer coast of Sitkalidak Island.–For several miles west from Cape Barnabas, the outer coast is particularly bold and rocky and seldom free of breaking seas. A series of mountain peaks stands close to the rounded outline of this projecting coastal section.

(452) About 5 miles west of Cape Barnabas, a channel navigable by launches in moderate weather leads to a lagoon. Practically all of the lagoon dries at low water.

(453) Partition Cove having a small islet in the center and separated from McDonald Lagoon by a low narrow neck of land, is foul.

(454) Ocean Bay the pronounced indentation of the outer coast of Sitkalidak Island, has a wide sand beach several miles long. The waters adjacent to a long section of the beach are apparently free of rocks. A sheltered anchorage during prevailing southwest weather may be found in 4 fathoms in the lee of the prominent rocky point marking the south end of the sand beach.

(455) On the coastal ridge between Ocean Bay and Black Point are two tips, 1,715 feet and 1,527 feet high, between which the ridge sags in a smooth curve. This feature may be recognized from seaward even against the distant background of higher mountains.

(456) Black Point the southwest end of Sitkalidak Island, is a low grass-covered cape sloping gently to the adjacent hills. It does not show darker than the surrounding country, but there are some low eroding bluffs around the cape and scattered boulders along the shore.

(457) A coastal shelf, approximately defined by the 27-fathom curve around Black Point, extends 4 miles offshore and spreads fan shaped about the point; very broken bottom exists on the shelf. Kelp is present throughout the shelf and becomes thick within 2.5 miles of shore. It is recommended that Black Point be given a berth of at least 4 miles.

(458) That part of Sitkalidak Strait west of Sitkalidak Island extends from its south entrance between Black Point and Twoheaded Island to Sitkalidak Passage.

(459) The most prominent point on the southwest end of Sitkalidak Island is at the west extremity of the coastal ridge back of the lowland in the vicinity of Black Point.

(460) Ship Rock 6 feet high, is at the southeast entrance of Sitkalidak Strait. Vessels should give the rock a wide berth to avoid the broken bottom extending about 1.2 miles to the southwest. A shoal area with a depth of 4½ fathoms is 1.8 miles west of Ship Rock in 56°59'41"N., 153°25'50"W.

(461) Puffin Island 75 feet high, is a grass-topped irregular mass of rock 0.6 miles northeast of Ship Rock. Several bare rocks, some of the pinnacle type, are near the island. The passages on either side of the island are not safe. The area within a quarter mile of Puffin Island on all sides is foul with kelp and breaks in larger swells.

(462) Tallapoosa Shoal with a least depth of 7 fathoms in 57°02'20.1"N., 153°27'11.8"W is in the middle of the strait 3.5 miles northwest of Ship Rock.

(463) Rolling Bay the first bay on the east side of Sitkalidak Strait from the south entrance, has a sand beach and tide lagoon at the head, and a valley leads to Ocean Bay. The bay offers protection from easterly winds, but is exposed to the prevailing southwest swell. Anchorage is afforded for large vessels on the centerline of the bay, just inside the point to the north in about 12 fathoms.

(464) A prominent rock, 83 feet high, having vertical sides and terminating in a dome-shaped top, is on the extensive reef projecting from the north point of Rolling Bay. A needle-top rock, 40 feet high, is near the point.

(465) Sitkalidak Lagoon is the upper part of Natalia Bay, the 5-mile inlet just north of Rolling Bay. The restricted entrance to the lagoon around the end of the spit is navigable only by small craft.

(466) Natalia Peninsula the rectangular mountainous headland on the east side of Sitkalidak Strait opposite Cape Kasiak, has two knolls; one of these is at the northwest end of the headland, the other is at Natalia Point the southwest end. A 3½-fathom shoal is 0.5 mile off the headland.


(468) Newman Bay is on the east side of Sitkalidak Strait opposite Three Saints Bay. A 5-fathom shoal is 0.5 mile off the north entrance point. Several dangers are near the south shore. A 4-fathom shoal extends 400 yards north of the point at 57°06'12"N., 153°21'07"W. The point appears as an island from a distance. Anchorage is available in 8 to 9 fathoms in the center of the upper bay.

(469) Old Harbor is a native village on the west side of Sitkalidak Strait 1 mile from the west end of Sitkalidak Passage. A school and a trading post are in the village. The City Dock has an available berthing area of 386 feet with dolphins and is used by the Alaskan State Ferry System and fishing vessels. Commercial air service is available from Kodiak.

(470) Pilotage, Old Harbor
(471) Pilotage, except for certain exempted vessels, is compulsory for all vessels navigating the waters of the State of Alaska.

(472) The Kodiak Island area is served by the Southwest Alaska Pilots Association. (See Pilotage, General (indexed), Chapter 3, for the pilot pickup stations and other details.)

(473) Vessels en route to Old Harbor can contact the pilot boat by calling “OLD HARBOR PILOT BOAT” on VHF-FM channel 16 or on a prearranged frequency between pilot and agent/vessel.

(474) A small-boat basin has been dredged at the head of the unnamed cove on the W side of Sitkalidak Strait, about 700 yards north of Old Harbor. A marked dredged channel leads west from the strait to the basin. A diversion dike protects the basin on the north side, and a 240-foot-long groin on the south side of the entrance protects the channel from shoaling. In 2005, the controlling depth was 8 feet in the entrance channel and basin except for lesser depths in the vicinity of Daybeacon 3 and along the west edge of the basin. The basin will provide protected moorage at a 562-foot float with berthing space for approximately 40 vessels. At the northwest side of the harbor is a dock available for handling supplies and equipment for fishing vessels and fueling small vessels.

(475) Between Old Harbor and the round point on the opposite shore, Sitkalidak Strait narrows to about 0.5 mile. The west half of this part of the strait is a sandy shoal having depths less than 3 fathoms. Some piles are at the south end of the shoal, 450 yards east of the L-shaped pier, at Old Harbor. A small reef, which uncovers 4 feet, is 100 yards off the east shore of the strait opposite Old Harbor.

(476) Barling Bay is the first bay south from Old Harbor. In northwest weather violent williwaws blow out of the bay. The bay near its head affords excellent holding ground for small craft and is secure except in northwest weather. The anchorage for large vessels is just inside the entrance in about 13 fathoms.

(477) A broad grass-covered sandpoint projects into Sitkalidak Strait forming the south entrance point of Barling Bay. One mile south of the point and about 0.6 mile off the west shore of the strait are a cluster of dangerous rocks marked by kelp. The least depth over them is 1 foot at low water. The outermost rock is 0.9 mile 204° from the point. The area between the rocks and the west shore is shoal.

(478) Three Saints Bay on the west side of Sitkalidak Strait, affords anchorage at the head in 14 to 18 fathoms, mud bottom. At the entrance, which is between Cape Liakik and Cape Kasiak, a shoal borders the southwest shore.

(479) A spit, with some rocks awash, and covered 2¾ fathoms near its outer end, extends about 0.6 mile south-southwest of Cape Liakik. John Island 90 feet high, is near the outer end of the spit, with another islet between it and Cape Liakik. Foul ground extends from John Island to a submerged rock 2.2 miles north and about 150 yards off the east shore.

(480) A course through the middle of the entrance leads between the shoal on the southwest shore and a 4-fathom shoal 0.5 mile north-northwest of John Island.

(481) The first Russian settlement on Kodiak Island was established on this bay in August 1784 and named for the vessel THREE SAINTS.

(482) The cannery on the sandspit on the west side of Three Saints Bay was destroyed by fire in 1931. The face of the cannery wharf remains. Depths at the wharf are 11 feet at the northwest corner, 4 feet about 5 yards farther inshore, and 24 feet at the downstream corner. Southeast of the wharf the low water shore areas extend beyond the line of the face of the wharf. A port landing is always made. With a heavy wind broadside on, it is impossible for a vessel under her own power to leave the wharf.

(483) An excellent anchorage for small vessels is in the cove formed by a long sandspit inside the entrance on the southwest side of the Three Saints Bay. A vessel about 65 feet long may anchor here.

(484) Two streams enter at the head of Three Saints Bay draining separate valleys. The south valley is said to have a trail leading across Kodiak Island to Uyak Bay.

(485) The three rocky peaks on the ridge that terminate at the headland at the turn of Three Saints Bay are locally known as The Three Saints. The peaks are over 3,000 feet high and when clear form a leading mark at sea for identifying the south entrance to Sitkalidak Strait.

(486) Cape Kasiak is a prominent headland on the west side of Sitkalidak Strait south of the entrance to Three Saints Bay.

(487) Kaiugnak Bay and Kiavak Bay collectively known as Wide Bay indent the west shore of Sitkalidak Strait between Cape Kasiak and Cape Kiavak. A small shoal of 3½ fathoms is 1 mile southwest of Cape Kasiak. A shoal of 2 fathoms is near the middle of the upper part of Kaiugnak Bay. A rock, which uncovers 5 feet, is 0.5 mile northeast of Cape Kiavak, and a rock awash, about 700 yards offshore, is about 1 mile northwest of the cape. There are two lagoons, one at the head of each bay; neither permits entrance except at high water. A large waterfall is in the northwest branch of Kaiugnak Bay.

(488) Anchorage for all weather except east gales is provided in the southwest part of Kaiugnak Bay. Large vessels should not proceed west of a line bearing S from the small island off the projecting point at the head of the bay.

(489) Knoll Bay is about 2.5 miles south of Cape Kiavak and north of Twoheaded Island.

(490) The coast from Cape Kiavak to the north entrance point of Knoll Bay is foul for 0.3 mile offshore. The coast and shore of the bay are fringed with covered and visible rocks, which extend about 0.2 mile offshore.

(491) Knoll Point the south entrance point to the bay, is fringed with many dangers. A rock awash, marked by kelp, is about 0.4 mile east of the point, and a large group of rocks, with kelp close east, are about 0.5 mile south of the point.

(492) Anchorage in Knoll Bay may be had in 12 fathoms during west weather, and small craft may anchor under the bluff in the south corner of the bay. The bay provides no shelter from east or south weather; anchorage is not recommended in these conditions.

(493) Chart 16590

(494) Twoheaded Island off the S extremity of the west shore of Sitkalidak Strait, rises to two irregularly rounded peaks; the higher, 1,837 feet, is northeast of the south extremity of the island, and the lower, 1,724 feet, is west. A ridge, 1,442 feet high, extends along the northeast part of the island.

(495) The coast of the island is bold and precipitous, particularly on the west and north faces, with numerous large boulders and rocks awash along the shores. Two bare rocks, 24 and 28 feet high, are near the southwest shore. The 28-foot rock is block shaped and the 24-foot rock is shaped like a finger pointing up from a heavy base.

(496) The passage north of Twoheaded Island, to Japanese Bay and Kaguyak Bay, has a channel width of 0.8 mile. In navigating the passage, vessels should avoid the foul area extending south of Knoll Point and favor Twoheaded Island.

(497) Japanese Bay consisting of an inner and outer bay, is narrow and has its entrance 2 miles northwest of Twoheaded Island. A rock, covered 2 fathoms and generally not marked by kelp, is in the middle of the entrance. Broken bottom extends northeast of the rock to a group of large rocks, 60 feet high, which overspread the east part of the entrance. The east and west shores of the bay are fringed with many submerged and rocks awash. The channel for entering the bay is west of the 2-fathom rock.

(498) Vessels may anchor near the head of the outer bay. After entering proceed midchannel until the inner tangent of the group of large rocks in the entrance is in range with the outermost of the two high rocks off Twoheaded Island. Then anchor in 12 to 16 fathoms, mud bottom.

(499) The restricted entrance to the inner bay is about 190 yards wide. The channel curves around the end of the gravel spit but has a depth of 11 fathoms. A vessel may be beached on the north side of the spit. It has been reported that vessels should avoid anchoring northwest of the spit, as the holding ground is poor. Several vessels have reported being blown ashore in heavy northeast weather.

(500) Cape Kaguyak is about 2 miles southwest of Twoheaded Island and between them is the passage leading to Japanese Bay. The area in the vicinity of the cape is foul. The 163-foot rocky islet at the southeast tip of the cape has the appearance of a huge sun dial. The outermost danger is a rock, covered 1¾ fathoms, 0.6 mile northeast of the cape. Kaguyak Bay immediately west of the cape, affords anchorage at the head of the bay in 6 to 9 fathoms from west and south winds. Larger vessels are afforded anchorage directly south of the bluff point on the north side of the bay in about 15 fathoms. With northeast winds small craft may find a fairly comfortable anchorage under the bluff on the southeast side of the head of the bay.

(501) The coast of Aliulik Peninsula from Cape Kaguyak to Cape Trinity, the southwest extremity of Kodiak Island, is bordered by foul ground. Extensive foul areas also surround Geese Islands and Aiaktalik Island which are along this coast. Geese Channel is not navigable except for small vessels with local knowledge. Ships proceeding along this coast pass through Sitkinak Strait. Old Kaguyak Bay and Russian Harbor provide anchorage for small vessels.

(502) The southernmost peak, 2,215 feet high, on Kodiak Island, is about 5 miles west of Cape Kaguyak. This detached mountain is regular in outline and forms a distinctive mark. From the mountain toward Cape Trinity is a long gradual slope.

(503) Flat Island about 0.9 mile off the entrance of Old Kaguyak Bay and 6 miles southwest of Twoheaded Island, is flat topped and 119 feet high. This island has sheer rocky bluffs. A pinnacle rock, 38 feet high, and another rock outside of it, are close to the southwest end of Flat Island. The rocky reef extending 0.7 mile to the northeast shows in small groups of rocks.

(504) A channel is between Flat Island and the mainland; its width is narrowed by heavy kelp beds on either side.

(505) Old Kaguyak Bay affords protection to small craft in north weather. A rock, 28 feet high, is in the center of the entrance and a rock, which uncovers about 3 feet, is 100 yards southwest of the elevated rock. To enter pass between the elevated rock and Boot Point but favor the shore around Boot Point to avoid the rock that uncovers 3 feet. Anchor in about 3 fathoms, sandy bottom, a little north of the center of the bay.

(506) Boot Point forming the west side of the entrance of Old Kaguyak Bay, is marked by a humped hill 496 feet high with sheer bluffs rising from the seaward side.

(507) About 0.5 mile southwest of the west extremity of the headland forming Boot Point are three islets close together. The middle islet is the most prominent, appearing as a series of sharp, rocky points from offshore rising to 41 feet at the north end. The islet 0.2 mile farther offshore is 19 feet high. The islet 0.1 mile inside is 10 feet high. The bay to the north of these islets and west of Boot Point is foul with rocks and kelp.

(508) Geese Islands three in number, are flat in appearance, the east and highest is 150 feet high. The passages between the islands are dry at low tide and the area for 1 mile south of the islands is foul.

(509) A reef and shoal area extends 3 miles east from the east Geese Islands, terminating in a rock covered 2½ fathoms. The rock breaks in a moderately heavy sea but not in ordinary weather. The reefs, 1 mile inside of the rock, bare 4 to 7 feet. It should be noted that the bottom shoals very abruptly in this locality.

(510) Aiaktalik Island about 2.5 miles west of the westernmost of the Geese Islands, shows as two knolls; the east one, 308 feet high, is the sharper and higher. The area south of the island is foul with kelp for 1.5 miles offshore.

(511) A cylindrical grass-covered rock, 50 feet in diameter and 58 feet high, stands on the shore reef at the west end of Aiktalik Island.

(512) Sundstrom Island is just off the southwest end of Aiktalik Island. Several wart-like projections rise above the general level of the island, which is about 70 feet; the highest is 158 feet. The shores consist of rocky bluffs.

(513) The passage between Sundstrom and Aiktalik Islands should prove useful to small craft in that it avoids the whirlpools and tide rips around the southwest point of Sundstrom Island. Both sides of the narrow passage are lined with heavy kelp but the midchannel is clear of kelp and has a controlling depth of about 2½ fathoms.

(514) The passage between Aiaktalik and Geese Islands is navigable for small vessels and has a controlling depth of about 6 fathoms and width of at least 0.4 mile; the chart is the best guide.

(515) The passage between Kodiak Island and the chain composing Aiaktalik Island and Geese Islands, via Geese Channel and Russian Harbor, is used considerably by small local vessels.

(516) Geese Channel the passage north of Geese Islands, has a controlling depth of 2½ fathoms. Shoals and reefs are scattered in the passage. Three buoys mark the channel; they are numbered from east to west. Heavy kelp marks the shoal patch 0.5 to 0.9 mile west of the west island of the Geese Islands.

(517) Russian Harbor between Aiaktalik Island and Kodiak Island, is a temporary anchorage in moderate weather, in about 8 fathoms, hard sand bottom. There is but little shelter, and strong tide rips are frequent.

(518) In general it is difficult to make courses good passing through Russian Harbor because of the strong currents, swirls and eddies. Aiaktalik Island Light 5 (56°43’53”N., 154°03’06”W.), 57 feet above the water, is shown from a square frame with a green square daymark on the north point of the island. A middle ground in Russian Harbor has a least depth of 2 fathoms.

(519) In Aiaktalik Cove the seas and wind sweep around the point in moderate weather, making the cove an uncomfortable anchorage. The best anchorage for small vessels, affording excellent protection from the prevailing northeast weather, is on the Kodiak Island side of Russian Harbor. This anchorage is 0.8 mile north of the point 3.4 miles east of Cape Trinity, opposite a stretch of sand beach in a break of the shore reef. The anchorage is in 4 fathoms, soft sand bottom.

(520) Sitkinak Strait is the broad strait lying between Trinity Islands and Kodiak Island. It is navigable for large vessels.

(521) The east approach is marked by Geese Islands on the north and Cape Sitkinak the east end of Sitkinak Island, on the south. As viewed from seaward, this end of Sitkinak Island shows as precipitous dark rock and shale bluffs dominated by two peaks or heads; the north one is 605 feet high and the south one is 821 feet.

(522) Two groups of two bare rocks are 0.5 mile and 1 mile off Cape Sitkinak. The outer group, light gray in appearance, is 17 feet high, and the inner group is 13 feet high. Rocks awash are outside of the outer group of bare rocks.

(523) An extensive fan-shaped reef, the limits of which are marked by thick growing kelp, extends almost 2 miles east and south of the southeast point of Aiaktalik Island. It is made up of a rocky ledge with many individual rocks, most of which uncover. It is believed that the rock on which the PAVLOF struck is located near the edge of this reef.

(524) A bank of considerable extent, with a least depth of 4¼ fathoms, is near the middle of Sitkinak Strait about 2 miles north of Whirlpool Point.

(525) Whirlpool Point north point of Sitkinak Island, is low, flat, and sandy. Whirlpool Point Light (56°37'00"N., 154°05'43"W.), 51 feet above the water, is shown from a skeleton tower with a red and white diamond-shaped daymark on the point. The tower is reported to be a good radar target.

(526) Currents
(527) The currents in Sitkinak Strait set west-northwest on the flood and east-southeast on the ebb. There are heavy tide rips in the strait particularly southwest and west of Aiaktalik Island. So far as observed, they are heaviest with a west wind and a flood current. The tide rips are often dangerous for small vessels. At times when the current opposes seas from east in the vicinity of Whirlpool Point, the seas become very steep. Current predictions for Sitkinak Strait may be obtained from the Tidal Current Tables.

(528) Routes
(529) Routes, Sitkinak Strait: A rocky ridge on Albatross Bank on which a depth of 8 fathoms was found, is in the seaward approach to Sitkinak Strait from the southeast. The ridge is about 42 miles 105° from the summit of Sitkinak Island and should be avoided in heavy weather.

(530) Enter the strait on a 270° course passing about 4.3 miles north of Sitkinak Cape and 1 mile off Whirlpool Point Light. Continue on this course for 4 miles until Dolina Point bears 190°. Then change to 000° and continue to a position 2.2 miles west from Cape Trinity. Due regard must be had for the strong currents in this strait.

(531) If bound for Alitak Bay, follow routes given later in this chapter.

(532) Chart 16580

(533) Albatross Bank about 45 miles off the southeast coast of Kodiak Island, has depths of 8 fathoms to about 61 fathoms.

(534) An area, having depths of 12 to 20 fathoms and covering about 50 square miles, is between 153°00'W. and 153°20'W. and between 56°20'N. and 56°28'N. The bottom characteristics noted on this area include gray mud, fine black sand and gravel and rock. Kelp has been seen in this area at various times. On occasion, moderate tide rips have been noted.

(535) A rocky shoal is a short distance to the east of the large shoal just described. The depths range from 8 to 20 fathoms with a very irregular rocky bottom. The shoalest part, in 56°22.5'N., 152°56.5'W., is a sharp rocky ridge with a depth of 8 fathoms. Currents with a velocity of about 3 knots were observed in this area. It should be avoided in heavy weather because of possible breakers.

(536) A 16-fathom bank is in 56°40'N., 152°10'W. There may be less water. This shoal is separated from the shoals previously described by an extensive trough of deep water. This trough extends north, and branches extend into both entrances of Sitkalidak Strait and toward Sitkinak Strait.

(537) Trinity Islands off the south end of Kodiak Island, consist of Sitkinak and Tugidak Islands inhabited by occasional hunters and fishermen in the summer and trappers in winter. An active cattle ranch is located on Sitkinak island, but the island has no permanent residents. Unsurveyed areas include the southwest coast of Sitkinak Island and all of Tugidak Island except the north end. Soundings in these unsurveyed areas are from reports.

(538) The island beaches are heavy shingle, gravel and in places fine sand; a few alder bushes are on both islands. Landings are easy with offshore winds, but with any change the sea makes up rapidly. Water can be obtained from the ravines and pools on the islands.

(539) Sitkinak Island (see also chart 16590), the east island, is divided into two parts by Sitkinak Lagoon which is navigable through the north entrance by small vessels, except during east swells or seas. The south entrance, fringed with rocks that uncover, should be attempted only with a calm sea; a small launch may enter at high water. The lagoon is a flat traversed by tidal channels, which are fairly deep near and inside the entrance, but the connecting channel between them is only 3 feet deep at high water. When viewed from the east, ranch buildings are visible on the north side of the lagoon, where the bluffs begin to rise.

(540) Sitkinak Dome 1,600 feet high, prominent, and with a smooth rounded top, dominates the west side of Sitkinak Island. The terrain drops gradually from the dome to Whirlpool Point. A parabolic antenna is just northeast of the dome.

(541) Anchorage for large vessels is afforded in the wide bay to the northeast of Sitkinak Lagoon, in about 11 fathoms of water. On multiple occasions while surveying the area in 2016, NOAA Ship Fairweather anchored in the vicinity of 56°34'42"N., 154°01'30"W., and found good holding ground and shelter from southerly and westerly weather.

(542) The island east of the lagoon is composed of many hills, some of which are separated from one another by low valleys. The northwest side of the island, southwest of Dolina Point is made up of earth cliffs several hundred feet high, broken by narrow ravines.

(543) The south coast of Sitkinak Island is foul and should be avoided. Kelp beds extend 0.5 to 2 miles off the east and south shores. A bank with its center 9.5 miles south-southwest from Cape Sitkinak has not been fully surveyed. The bank has depths of 11 fathoms to 20 fathoms and covers an area about 0.5 to 1.5 miles wide and about 6 miles long. It extends in a north-northeast to south-southwest direction and is an extension of an extensive area along the south coast of Sitkinak Island having depths less than 20 fathoms with irregular bottom in most places.

(544) A temporary anchorage is off the south entrance to Sitkinak Lagoon. This part of the south coast of the island is recognized offshore by the flatland at the lagoon. A prominent rocky point with an arched opening 50 feet high marks the entrance to the lagoon. To reach this anchorage from outside the 20-fathom curve, steer for the point with the arched opening bearing 026° and anchor in not less than 11 fathoms about 1 mile from the point.

(545) Tugidak Passage between Sitkinak and Tugidak Islands, has very strong and freakish tidal currents and rips. Only the north approach has been surveyed. The south approach is apparently blocked by shoals. Tide rips in the middle of the passage are extremely dangerous to small boats and should be avoided by hugging the Tugidak Island shore.

(546) Tugidak Island in its north part, is chiefly sandflats but little above high water. A level boulder patch that uncovers is 0.5 mile off the north coast of Tugidak Island, 5 miles west of Tugidak Passage.

(547) The higher parts of the island are low grassy sandhills that terminate in bluffs in places along the shores. The north part is separated from the south or higher part by a large lagoon having one entrance from the southeast.

(548) The lagoon is reported to bare, except near the southwest side of the entrance where there is a pocket or basin of about 5 to 6 fathoms, sand bottom. The basin is a suitable anchorage for small boats and is protected from the sea by a long sandspit that extends east from the entrance point on the southwest side. A narrow channel follows the southeast side of Tugidak Island; however, it is almost bare at low water so passage in and out is possible only at half or greater tide.

(549) A foul and broken area extends about 10 miles south from the south end of Tugidak Island, as shown on the chart, by compass bearings on Tugidak Island and the summit of Sitkinak Island. Until a survey is available it is considered unsafe for vessels to cross this area. The bottom is very uneven, the depths changing abruptly from 2 to 4 fathoms in places, and boulder reefs with little depth may be expected. There are strong currents and heavy rips and overfalls.

(550) The waters off the north end of Tugidak Island have been surveyed. The general absence of kelp in this comparatively shoal area may be taken as an indication of the existence of little if any ledge rock. The bottom apparently is composed of loose material including boulders leveled down by the action of the sea to form the more or less flat area of this region of 5 to 7 fathoms. Slight shoaling occurs in patches where apparently there is a predominance of boulders resisting the general leveling action of the sea.

(551) The north and west sides of Tugidak Island may be generally approached as close as 1.5 miles in good weather. Care should be exercised near the middle of the west side of the island, as an unsurveyed bank reported to be covered as little as 2 fathoms is possibly 2 or 3 miles off. Anchorage can be found on the east side of the island between the entrance to the lagoon and the foul area extending off the south end.

(552) Chirikof Island (see also chart 16587) is about 60 miles south-southwest of the Trinity Islands. The south part of the island has bold, high peaks and bluffs, from which it gradually slopes to the north end, terminating in a low, green undulating country. The island is easily recognized and is visible for many miles in clear weather.

(553) The south shore of Chirikof Island is a Steller sea lion rookery site. There is a 3-mile vessel exclusionary buffer zone around the southern half of the island. (See 50 CFR 224.103 Chapter 2, for limits and regulations.) In emergency situations anchorage may be found in Southwest Anchorage a bight at the southwest corner of the island. On multiple occasions in 2012, NOAA ship RAINIER anchored in the vicinity of 55°51'12"N, 155°33'00"W., and found the area to have good holding ground. The anchorage is sheltered from west and southwest seas. Anchorage difficulties may be experienced in heavy weather due to williwaws and limited swinging room. Foul ground is between Chirikof Island and Nagai Rocks. Round Rock resembling a haystack, is the largest of the Nagai Rocks group.

(554) A conspicuous 40-foot rock pillar is about ¾ mile northeast of South Cape. A foul area extends from the east side near the middle of the island. Large kelp areas extend up to 2 miles from shore on the north side of the island.

(555) Currents of over 3 knots may be experienced in the vicinity of Chirikof Island and generally set to the north and south. These currents, in conjunction with the bathymetry, may cause large standing waves and breakers, particularly to the south and southwest of Round Rock and at the north end of the island.

(556) The wide passage between Chirikof Island and Tugidak Island has not been adequately surveyed. From widely scattered soundings taken in this locality, it appears that a submarine ridge with depths less than 19 fathoms extends from one island to the other. Foul and broken bottom extends about 10 miles south from Tugidak Island. Fairly regular depths across the ridge are indicated in the more closely sounded area 10 miles north of Chirikof Island. Tugidak Island is low and featureless and cannot be used as a navigational guide in the passage. Vessels bound for Chignik from the east use this passage.

(557) Currents
(558) Between Sitkinak and Chirikof Islands the general set of the current is reported to be about 249° 0.5 knot. The current between Chirikof Island and Lighthouse Rocks has a south set, less than 0.5 knot. From Lighthouse Rocks to Kupreanof Point the current sets generally 260° and varies from 0.3 to 0.7 knot.

(559) On three runs between Chirikof Island and Castle Rock on the Shumagin Islands, a south set was experienced each time, an average of as much as 1.5 knots having been noted.

(560) Vessels crossing the Gulf of Alaska westbound are often subjected to a strong north set and should verify their position by sounding when approaching the meridian of Chirikof Island.

(561) Charts 16590, 16591

(562) Alitak Bay at the south end of Kodiak Island, has its entrance between Cape Alitak and Cape Trinity and extends 26 miles in a north direction to the head of Deadman Bay. Lazy Bay is a good anchorage.

(563) The country is treeless and except for outcropping ledges of bare rock on the knolls and peaks, the land is covered by thick moss and grass. A herd of reindeer is maintained in the vicinity of Lazy Bay by the natives.

(564) The prominent feature in the approach is Twin Peaks on the peninsula between Lazy Bay and Kempff Bay. It can be seen from off Cape Ikolik on a clear day. The peninsula between Kempff Bay and Olga Bay is mountainous and rises to 2,000 feet.

(565) Pilotage, Alitak
(566) Pilotage, except for certain exempted vessels, is compulsory for all vessels navigating the waters of the State of Alaska.

(567) The Kodiak Island area is served by the Southwest Alaska Pilots Association. (See Pilotage, General (indexed), Chapter 3, for the pilot pickup stations and other details.)

(568) Vessels en route to Alitak Bay can contact the pilot boat by calling “ALITAK BAY PILOT BOAT” on VHF-FM channel 16 or on a prearranged frequency between pilot and agent/vessel.

(569) Cape Trinity the south entrance point to Alitak Bay, is a tableland terminating in an almost vertical bluff. Rocks and reefs extend a short distance off the cape.

(570) Cape Alitak the north entrance point of Alitak Bay, is the south end of a sloping ridge with numerous knolls. It is partly grass covered with much bare rock. Deep water extends close up to the cape on its southwest side, but a long shoal of fine gray sand makes off its southeast side in the direction of Cape Trinity. Numerous rocks are also close off the north, east and west sides of the cape. The 10-fathom curve extends 3 miles off the cape and the 5-fathom curve is about 1.3 miles off. At the outer end of the shoal the depth increases rapidly to 20 fathoms. Cape Alitak Light (56°50'35"N., 154°18'25"W.), 63 feet above the water, is shown from a small house with a red and white diamond-shaped daymark on the south end of the cape.

(571) Lazy Bay 4 miles northeast from Cape Alitak, is well marked by Twin Peaks and Egg Island on its north side and some white rocky ledges close to its south entrance point. The shore south of the entrance is clear if given a berth of 0.4 mile with the exception of the shoal making off the southeast side of Cape Alitak.

(572) A cannery with a wharf is on the north shore about 1 mile west from Egg Island. The wharf is 180 feet long with 30 feet reported alongside the face. Water is available at the wharf, and the cannery has limited machine shop facilities. Diesel and fuel oils are stored in some quantity for cannery use. The cannery season is May through September. Caretakers man the cannery in the off-season. The cannery monitors VHF-FM channel 16 and 4125 kHz single sideband (SSB); call sign is KBL-75. VHF-FM channel 79A is used as a working frequency; 2450 kHz SSB is also available. Telephone service is available at the village of Akhiok. The cannery maintains a store seasonally. A nurse or first aid technician is available during the canning season, but there are no hospital accommodations. Injuries or illnesses requiring hospitalization are flown to Kodiak. Air service is available to and from Kodiak on Tuesdays and Fridays during the off-season and six days a week during the open season.

(573) A slipway capable of hauling out vessels up to about 130 tons, with a maximum draft of 6 feet forward and 8 feet aft, is at the cannery.

(574) The north part of the bay beyond the sandspit above the cannery consists of mudflats and many boulders.

(575) Anchorage in 9 to 15 fathoms, mud bottom, may be had between the cannery and the east entrance point to Rodman Reach. With east gales the wind blows directly in Lazy Bay and there is little room in case of dragging or parting a cable. Northwesters blow with great force into Lazy Bay from over the ridge back of the head of the bay. Small craft can find excellent shelter and smooth water in the entrance to Rodman Reach during east weather.

(576) Rodman Reach is a narrow arm that extends southwest from Lazy Bay and inside of Tanner Head to Cape Alitak where it forms a shallow basin from which Alitak Lagoon also shallow, extends 3 miles north, being separated from the sea by a narrow shingle spit. About 100 yards off the east entrance point are two rocks awash. Excellent shelter for small craft will be found in the entrance to Rodman Reach.

(577) Kodiak National Wildlife Refuge includes waters of Lazy Bay, Rodman Reach and Alitak Lagoon. Kodiak National Wildlife Refuge is a Marine Protected Area.

(578) Egg Island is the low, flat rocky islet off the north entrance to Lazy Bay. Lazy Bay Light 2 (56°53'31"N., 154°13'03"W.), 25 feet above the water, is shown from a skeleton tower with a red triangular daymark on the south side of the island.

(579) Twin Peaks between Lazy and Kempff Bays, are a mark from as far west as Cape Ikolik. North Twin Peak the higher one, is 1,494 feet and South Twin Peak is 1,310 feet. Both peaks are fairly definite, devoid of vegetation and very rocky and stony. From the W they are first raised as an island.

(580) Kempff Bay on the north side of Twin Peaks, is too deep for convenient anchorage and on its north side has broken bottom that should be avoided. There are neither settlements nor improvements in Kempff Bay.

(581) Favoring somewhat the south shore through the bay, anchorage can be selected near the head in about 18 fathoms. A spit with deep water close-to extends 350 yards from the north shore at a point 0.7 mile from the head.

(582) A reef, covered at high water, is between Drake Head and White Rock and extends 0.5 mile from the shore just south of Kempff Bay. White Rock, 10 feet high, should be given a berth of 0.3 mile when passing east of it in Alitak Bay and the same distance when passing north of it entering Kempff Bay.

(583) Akhiok a native village on the beach of Akhiok Bay about 1.5 miles northeast from Kempff Bay, has a schoolhouse and a Russian Orthodox Church. A foot trail leads from the cannery at Lazy Bay to Akhiok. Akhiok is best reached by launch via the passage from Kempff Bay. This passage is shoal and has many rocks. A pilot can usually be obtained at the Lazy Bay cannery.

(584) Round Hill 193 feet high, is a symmetrical, round grassy knoll at the east end of Akhiok Island that forms the north side of the entrance to Kempff Bay.

(585) Akhiok Reef awash at extreme high water and always showing, is a group of black jagged rocks about 0.6 mile off the southeast point of Akhiok Island. In clear weather the reef makes a good landmark. A deep pocket of 30 fathoms is 350 yards southeast of Akhiok Reef. A 4¼-fathom spot, marked on its east side by a buoy, is 0.4 mile east of Akhiok Reef.

(586) Small vessels, with local knowledge, when bound from Lazy Bay to Moser Bay pass between Akhiok Reef and Akhiok Island. Strangers are advised to keep to the east of the buoy marking the 4¼-fathom spot.

(587) Middle Reef covers an area about 2 miles long in the central part of Alitak Bay. The northwest end of the reef area is marked by a group of black rocks that uncover about 7 feet and will usually be seen or breaking. A kelp-marked rock, which uncovers 2 feet, and a ledge, which uncovers 5½ feet, are along the east side of the reef area. The kelp-marked shoal at the south extremity is covered 2¾ fathoms. There is little if any warning of shoaling of the general depths of the bay adjacent to the reef area.

(588) Nelson Reef which has a least known depth of 2½ fathoms, is 1.5 miles north of Middle Reef and 2.7 miles east-southeast from the entrance to Moser Bay. A thin growth of kelp is sometimes seen on this reef.

(589) Moser Bay the large northwest arm of Alitak Bay, has depths of 10 to 15 fathoms, soft mud bottom. It is a secure harbor and an excellent anchorage. The entrance is between Bun Point low, sandy, and marked by a light, and Amik Island rocky, on the south; it is obstructed by a rocky shoal that makes north from Amik Island for about 0.5 mile. The north end of the shoal is marked by a buoy.

(590) The channel between Bun Point and the north end of the rocky shoal is 175 yards wide and is close to Bun Point. It has a least depth of about 5½ fathoms, and strong tidal currents flow in the direction of the axis of the channel.

(591) About halfway between Bun Point and Fassett Point is a shoal that extends halfway across from the northeast shore toward a spit on the opposite shore. The shoal has a depth of 3 fathoms at its outer end, which is marked by a buoy.

(592) A gravel shoal, which uncovers, extends 400 yards east-northeast from the spit on the south shore opposite the shoal described above.

(593) Fassett Point a low grassy head with lower land back of it, is the turning point on the northeast side of Moser Bay, about 2 miles inside the entrance.

(594) Trap Point is the low point across the channel from Fassett Point. The Alaska Packers Association maintains a warehouse, wharf and ways for hauling out scows here. The wharf has a face of 100 feet and a least depth of 34 feet alongside.

(595) Snug Cove southwest from Trap Point, shoals gradually to its head. A pass between the mountains extends from Snug Cove to the sea.

(596) Chip Cove is on the west side of Moser Bay, 1.5 miles north of Trap Point. The cannery pier, on the west side of the cove entrance, has depths of 20 feet alongside the working faces.

(597) Radiotelephone and radiotelegraph communications are maintained by the cannery.

(598) Olga Narrows connects Moser Bay with Olga Bay. It is possible to carry about 21 feet through the passage only by carefully following the narrow and crooked channel. It should not be attempted except with local knowledge.

(599) The current in the narrowest part of Olga Narrows attains an estimated velocity of 8 knots. During large tides there is no stage at which there is slack water the entire length of the narrows. During small tides there is said to be a period of slack water lasting from ½ to 1½ hours.

(600) Olga Bay is an irregularly shaped body of water 17 miles long. The west end is separated from the ocean by a strip of land 1 mile wide at a point 6 miles north of Low Cape. The shores of Olga Bay are rocky except at the west end where low grassy bluffs are from 10 to 80 feet high. On the north and south shores of the bay the land rises abruptly from 800 to 2,000 feet.

(601) The bay has the appearance of a lake and the rise and fall of the tide is only from 1 to 2 feet at the former cannery, which was on the north shore about 8.5 miles above the narrows. The buildings and wharf of the former cannery now are used as a base camp for big-game guides. The wharf has depths of 7 to 11 feet alongside.

(602) Anchorage for fishing craft can be found at several places along the shores. The best anchorage is in Anchor Cove on the south side of Olga Bay, 5.5 miles above the north end of the narrows. The cannery company had dolphins here where small boats tied up over the winter.

(603) Deadman Bay is deep except near the head where it divides into two arms. The N arm terminates in a mudflat, while the east arm, known as Alpine Cove, affords excellent anchorage. The northwest shore of Deadman Bay is fringed with numerous rocks and reefs, while the southeast shore is bold and unusually clear. No settlements are along the bay, only an occasional cabin used by trappers during the winter.

(604) Between Bun Point and Fox Island are several off-lying islets and rocks and much foul ground. The shore here should not be approached closer than 1 mile except with local knowledge.

(605) Fox Island about 0.5 mile off the west shore near the entrance to Deadman Bay, is bordered by bluffs and is 90 feet high. It is grass covered, comparatively flat, and a good mark in entering Deadman Bay.

(606) Alpine Cove the east arm at the head of Deadman Bay, is a beautiful cove surrounded by high rugged mountains. An excellent anchorage is near the entrance in 12 to 15 fathoms, mud bottom, and sheltered from all winds and seas.

(607) From Cape Trinity, the east shore of Alitak Bay trends north-northeast for about 14 miles to Shag Bluff, the south entrance point of Portage Bay. This section of the coast has many visible and submerged rocks and reefs extending in places as much as 0.6 mile offshore.

(608) Portage Bay opens into Alitak Bay from the northeast. Bert Point dark and rocky, 3.7 miles east of Cape Hepburn, separates the bay into two arms.

(609) Sulua Bay the main or west arm, extends 3.5 miles north from Bert Point. Between Cape Hepburn and the west entrance point of Sulua Bay, a bank, with reefs and rocks submerged and awash, extends as much as 0.5 mile offshore.

(610) The shores of Sulua Bay are precipitous, except at its head where a stream enters through the flats. Several short gravel spits extend from the west side, and on the two nearest the entrance are cabins used by fishermen during the season. Mooring piles are on the north side of these spits.

(611) On the east side of this arm, a bank with depths of less than 5 fathoms extends about 0.3 mile offshore. Two rocks, the south one of which uncovers 2 feet, are on this bank and are about 1.7 and 2.1 miles, respectively, north of Bert Point.

(612) The east arm of Portage Bay is short and terminates in a large shoal lagoon extending 2.5 miles northeast. A stream enters through the flats at the head of the lagoon.

(613) Shag Bluff is on the south side of Portage Bay, 2.4 miles south of Bert Point. A group of rocks, bare and awash, the highest 10 feet, is about 1 mile west of the bluff. Between Shag Bluff and the head of the east arm, a bank covered less than 3 fathoms, extends about 0.4 mile offshore. A shoal covered 3½ fathoms is on this bank about 0.5 mile southwest of Bert Point.

(614) A good anchorage is about 0.5 mile southeast of a 44-foot pinnacle rock at the head of Sulua Bay in 10 fathoms, mud bottom.

(615) Routes
(616) Routes, Alitak Bay: Coming from the west, steer 075° for 88 miles from Foggy Cape bearing 327° 10 miles. This will lead to a position in the middle of the entrance to Alitak Bay 3.6 miles 145° from Cape Alitak. The southernmost peak, 2,215 feet, on Kodiak Island should be about on the port bow while passing Cape Alitak on the course given.

(617) If following the southwest coast of Kodiak Island in approaching Alitak Bay, follow the routes given later in this chapter: Cape Karluk to Cape Alitak bearing 010° 1.5 miles. Then steer 121° for 2.7 miles to clear the shoal making southeast from Cape Alitak. This will lead to the midentrance position 3.6 miles 145° from Cape Alitak.

(618) To enter Lazy Bay: (1) From Alitak Bay midentrance position given above, steer 015° for about 5.5 miles until the south shore of Lazy Bay is abeam. Then change to 309° until Egg Island is abeam on the starboard hand, 350 yards, then change to 284° and enter the bay.

(619) (2) If coming from Sitkinak Strait, follow routes given earlier in this chapter, to a position 2.2 miles west from Cape Trinity. Then steer 003° for about 8 miles until the south shore of Lazy Bay bears 287°. Then change to 309° until Egg Island is abeam on the starboard hand, 350 yards. Then change to 284° and enter the bay.

(620) To enter Moser Bay: (1) From Alitak Bay midentrance position given above, steer 034° for 9.2 miles until Akhiok village bears 297° 3 miles. Then change to 348° heading 150 yards off Bun Point. When nearly up to Bun Point change to 005° passing 150 yards off the highwater line at the point. When the buoy bears 237° haul west to a 290° course, passing about 275 yards north of the buoy.

(621) Continue on this course for 1 mile until past the buoy marking the end of the long shoal that makes out from the northeast shore. Then haul to the north and anchor as desired.

(622) Strong tidal currents will be found at Bun Point setting along the axis of the channel. Large vessels should wait for slack water.

(623) (2) If coming from Sitkinak Strait, follow directions given earlier, to a position 2.2 miles west from Cape Trinity. Then steer 019° for 11.5 miles until Akhiok village is abeam on the port hand, 2.6 miles. Then change to 348° heading 150 yards off Bun Point, and follow directions given above for entering Moser Bay.

(624) To enter Deadman Bay: From a position with the northwest Middle Reefs bearing 121° 1.5 miles, make good a 041° course for about 4 miles until the south end of Fox Island is on the port beam, nearly 1 mile. This course leads 0.5 mile northwest of Nelson Reef, a shoal with a least known depth of 2½ fathoms. When the south end of Fox Island is abeam haul to the north and steer midchannel courses up Deadman Bay, if anything favoring the southeast shore.

(625) Chart 16580

(626) Shelikof Strait separates Kodiak and adjoining islands from the mainland of Alaska. The strait is reached from the east via the passages north and south of the Barren Islands or via Kupreanof Strait.

(627) From Barren Islands to Cape Ikolik, depths ranging from 80 fathoms in the north end to 140 fathoms in the south entrance will be found in midchannel. Along the east shore, the 100-fathom curve is from 1 to 3 miles off the various headlands. Suitable depths for temporary anchorage will be found near the shores in most places.

(628) In thick weather when not sure of the position, depths should not be shoaled less than 50 fathoms. For deep-draft vessels it is considered safer to favor the east shore.

(629) Currents
(630) The limited current data available for Shelikof Strait indicate that the flood sets into the strait from both ends.

(631) Current observations have been made for short periods at various anchorages used by surveying vessels near the shore. On the west side of the strait currents of 1 knot have been recorded, setting alongshore in either direction, with the current in the southwest direction predominating. Apparently the current is less along the west coast of Afognak Island than on the opposite side of the strait.

(632) At the northeast entrance to the strait in the vicinity of Dark Island and Latax Rocks, heavy tide rips, variable in position, are frequent; strong tidal currents are encountered along the coast of Shuyak Island.

(633) Weather, Shelikof Strait Vicinity
(634) Northeast winds invariably bring rain and thick weather, and it is from this direction that most of the heavy weather comes.

(635) Southeast winds generally bring clouds but may be accompanied by either rain or fair weather.

(636) Southwest and west winds are invariably accompanied by fine clear weather, but they often blow with great force. The southwest gale is perhaps the most to be dreaded in Shelikof Strait, as it raises a short, heavy sea that is trying to a small vessel.

(637) South winds generally bring haze, which is sometimes so thick as to resemble fog.

(638) Northwest winds bring fair weather and clear atmosphere; however, in the wake of the Katmai region, the air may be hazy due to volcanic dust.

(639) During the early spring, northwest gales are often accompanied by freezing weather and vessels are in danger of becoming iced down. Small craft, especially, should hug the northwest shore under such conditions, so that they may seek shelter before the icing becomes serious.

(640) Gales in this region last without intermission anywhere from 1 to 3 days.

(641) Northeast winds are generally accompanied by a low barometer and southwest winds by a high barometer, but the rule is not invariable. The barometer is of little or no value in foretelling the weather, as it accompanies rather than precedes corresponding conditions. The slope of the barometric curve is apt to change suddenly, the weather changing with equal suddenness. A sure sign of rainy weather and wind from the northeast is the gathering of clouds on the northeast side of the mountains.

(642) Blinding snowstorms are frequent in early spring.

(643) In 1975, the NOAA Ship FAIRWEATHER, working in Shelikof Strait, reported the following weather conditions: July and August afforded the best weather and May the worst. Storms with winds to gale force occurred about twice a month. Some snow showers were experienced in May.

(644) The wind in Shelikof Strait usually blows in only two directions, either “up” (southwest to northeast) or “down.” The direction usually depends on whether the area south of Kodiak Island contains a low pressure (when down the strait winds result accompanied by driving rain) or a high pressure (when up the strait winds result). Winds and seas can increase suddenly and subside just as quickly.

(645) During windy conditions, wind force is sharply higher in the vicinity of, and even in the lee of the capes and point that extend into Shelikof Strait. During these conditions, entry well into the bays is necessary for refuge. With “down” wind conditions, seas on the west side become considerably worse as one progresses northeast from Kukak Bay, and with “up” wind conditions, the same applies along the west side from Cape Kuliak to the southwest.

(646) Weather conditions in Shelikof Strait can also be of wide variance from one location to another at any one time. However, as a rule, weather and seas are much more amenable on the Kodiak Island side of the strait than on the mainland side.

(647) The west coasts of Shuyak and Afognak Islands trend 218°. The distance from the northernmost Latax Rocks, described earlier in this chapter, to Raspberry Cape is 48 miles. From Raspberry Cape the east coast of Shelikof Strait trends 230° for 45 miles to Cape Karluk.

(648) Chart 16604

(649) The west side of Shuyak Island is irregular and fringed by a chain of islets and rocks about 1 mile offshore. Between them and the island are many rocks and kelp patches. The outer ones are nearly on a line through Gull Island from Black Cape.

(650) Shag Island a group of grass-covered islets, is 36 feet high and 0.9 mile west of Party Cape. A bare rock, 3 feet high, is 0.6 mile north of Shag Island. A shoal with a least depth of 4 fathoms is about 1.7 miles northwest of the islets.

(651) Wonder Bay southeast of Shag Island, is rock strewn and should not be entered except by launches with local knowledge.

(652) Gull Island 2.8 miles southwest of Party Cape, has a distinctive dome-shaped top, grass covered and 83 feet high. Several large reddish rocks are to the north of it. It marks the entrance to Western Inlet which is shallow and foul. Gull Island is connected to the large island at the entrance of Western Inlet by a sandspit that bares at minus tides. This area is extremely foul.

(653) Big Bay 2.5 miles south of Gull Island, is of considerable size, having a main arm branching into four smaller arms at its head. The main arm has a controlling depth of 2¼ fathoms, and although it affords protection in northeast weather, it should not be attempted without local knowledge, as its entrance is obstructed by numerous rocks, many of which uncover. The smaller arms are not accessible except to very small craft.

(654) In 1971, the 231-foot NOAA Ship RAINIER anchored a number of times off the west side of Shuyak Island in about 58°33.6'N., 152°42.4'W., 1.7 miles northwest of Eagle Cape, in 18 fathoms for protection from east winds. The ship reported that the anchor nearly always dragged some when dropped before setting in rocky bottom. The holding quality was fair, though on one occasion no dragging was experienced in winds of 50 knots.

(655) Chart 16605

(656) Shuyak Strait between Shuyak and Afognak Islands, is not recommended as a through passage for ships because of its restricted east entrance and broken bottom in the seaward approach from the east. Its west approach in Shelikof Strait is characterized by less uneven bottom and the west entrance is mainly clear and 1.5 miles wide.

(657) Entering Shuyak Strait from Shelikof Strait, vessels pass about 1 or 1.5 miles north of Rocky Island and head for the middle of the strait on a course of about 113°.

(658) Islets and rocks, which uncover, are on both sides of the west approach to Shuyak Strait. The best water is found by favoring the north side of this approach.

(659) Shuyak Strait is apparently clear of dangers in midchannel except as noted below. Soundings indicate depths of 60 to 80 fathoms near midchannel as far east as Redfox Bay. Wooded hills, about 400 feet high, line the rocky shores on both sides, and there is practically no low flatland.

(660) Rocky Island 4 miles west from Lighthouse Point, is on the south side of the west approach to Shuyak Strait. It is a bare rock 12 feet high and about 100 feet wide. Midway between Rocky Island and Lighthouse Point but south of a line between them is a reef bare at half tide. The reef is marked by kelp and surrounded by shoal water.

(661) The outermost danger on the north side of the west approach to Shuyak Strait is a group of submerged rocks with a least depth of 2¼ fathoms about 3 miles 052° from Rocky Island. A rock baring at minus tide is 400 yards northeast of the rocky shoal, and the area inside of them to Green Island and thence to the shore at Neketa Bay is foul.

(662) Neketa Bay is a small bay east of Green Island, very shoal, with a reef extending nearly across its entrance.

(663) A rocky bank of 12 to 17 fathoms is about 1.5 miles northeast of Rocky Island. In approaching the west entrance of Shuyak Strait it would be advisable to pass north of the bank.

(664) Alligator Island so called from the resemblance from certain directions, is grass covered, 0.3 mile in diameter and 64 feet high; the island is 1.3 miles south from Rocky Island. Alligator Island Light (58°28'28"N., 152°47'17"W.), 72 feet above the water, is shown from a skeleton tower with a red and white diamond-shaped daymark on the northwest side of the island.

(665) Cape Newland the southwest extremity of Shuyak Island, is 75 feet high and grass covered to the tree line. Rocks awash at various stages of the tide are detached 500 yards west and about 600 yards south from the cape. Broken bottom extends into the entrance to Shuyak Strait about one-third the way from the cape to Lighthouse Point.

(666) Lighthouse Point 4.2 miles east of Alligator Island and grass covered to the tree line, is on the south side of the west entrance to Shuyak Strait. The bight just east of the point is foul. Lighthouse Point Light (58°28'57"N., 152°39'09"W.), 60 feet above the water, is shown from a small house with a red and white diamond-shaped daymark on the point.

(667) Shuyak Harbor is about 1.3 miles north of Lighthouse Point and southeast of Cape Newland. Two bare rocks, 12 and 5 feet high and 100 yards apart, are in midentrance to the harbor; they are surrounded by rocks awash and are nearly connected at low water. A pinnacle rock, covered 1¼ fathoms, is east of the midentrance rocks, leaving a narrow channel between it and the east entrance point. The better channel into Shuyak Harbor is west of the midentrance rocks. The harbor has about 200 yards of swinging room. The salteries in this harbor have been abandoned and the wharves are no longer maintained.

(668) Port Lawrence is a bight on the north shore of Shuyak Strait, 1.5 miles from the west entrance. A small grass-covered 10-foot islet, surrounded by foul ground, is in the east part of the bight. The wharf at the abandoned herring plant is in bad condition and unusable.

(669) Port William 0.5 mile east of Port Lawrence, is 0.3 mile wide and 0.5 mile long. The wharf of a former cannery is in disrepair.

(670) Rocks awash are about 250 yards offshore between Port Lawrence and Port William. Nearby and closer inshore is a rock about 10 feet high.

(671) Redfox Bay the largest indentation on the south side of Shuyak Strait, has general depths of less than 20 fathoms, mud bottom, and affords excellent anchorage in any weather.

(672) An islet, 158 feet high, and wooded on its south half, is in the middle of the entrance. West of the islet, about 100 yards off the west shore of the bay, is a rock awash. Freight steamers use the channel between these rocks and the islet, which is about 200 yards wide and clear, and anchor just south of the islet to discharge cargo to boats and barges; swinging room of about 700 yards is available here.

(673) A rock awash, unmarked by kelp, is off the entrance to a small cove on the east shore of the bay 0.8 mile south from the entrance islet.

(674) Daylight Harbor is 0.5 mile southeast of Port William. The herring plant here has been abandoned, and the wharf is in ruins. From this harbor to Cape Current about 3 miles, there are no important indentations.

(675) A dangerous patch of small rocky heads with a least depth of 3¼ fathoms is in about the middle of the strait 2.3 miles from its east end. This danger is abreast of two small islets; the west one is about 100 yards in diameter, partly grass covered and wooded. The kelp marking this spot usually is drawn under by the current.

(676) Cape Current Narrows about 1 mile long, forms the east end of Shuyak Strait. Rocky obstructions in the narrows near the east end greatly reduce the width of the channels on either side of them.

(677) The Shuyak Island shore of the narrows is abrupt, wooded and about 500 feet high. The Afognak side is grass covered for about 200 feet back from the shore and about 50 feet high with level top and abrupt shore.

(678) In the middle of the west part of the narrows, general depths are about 8½ fathoms or more. In the east part of the narrows, broken ground with numerous rocks awash extends almost completely across from Cape Current to Shuyak Island. Two narrow channels lead through the broken ground, one about 450 yards northwest of Cape Current, and the other about 75 yards off the south shore of Shuyak Island. The former channel has a least found depth of 4½ fathoms; the latter channel has a least found depth of 5½ fathoms. Mariners are advised to seek local knowledge before attempting to make passage through Cape Current Narrows.

(679) The tidal currents at Cape Current Narrows are strong, and bad tide rips are frequent. Current predictions may be obtained from the Tidal Current Tables.

(680) A large kelp patch is northeast of the east entrance to the narrows just south of Big Fort Island.

(681) Bluefox Bay indenting the shore of Afognak Island southwest from Lighthouse Point, has an entrance about 2 miles wide.

(682) Teck Island Hogg Island and Bear Island are the three principal islands overspreading the entrance and the area inside of Bluefox Bay. The buildings of an abandoned herring reduction plant, now used as family dwellings and for the storage of fishing gear, are on the south side of Hogg Island.

(683) Three channels lead into Bluefox Bay. The west channel has been used by small craft, but it is foul and is not recommended.

(684) The east channel is the one in general use, but it also has several dangers and should be navigated with caution. A 4¼-fathom spot is in midchannel about 200 yards off the middle of the east side of Hogg Island. A rock with a least depth of 1½ fathoms is 375 yards east from the southeast point of Bear Island. A rock awash is about 0.5 mile south from the same point. At this rock the tangents of Hogg and Bear Islands are nearly in range. A rock with 2¼ fathoms over it is 200 yards off the southeast side of the small island just south of Bear Island.

(685) To enter Bluefox Bay, vessels are reported to hold the course into Shuyak Strait until the east channel opens then to change course to about 177° and proceed through the east entrance in midchannel, heading for a wooded point on the east side of the bay near its head but favoring the west side of the channel near the 4¼-fathom spot mentioned above. Navigation beyond Bear Island is difficult, and the chart should be followed closely.

(686) Chart 16604

(687) The west coast of Afognak Island from Shuyak Strait to Black Cape is irregular, rocky and wooded to an elevation of about 700 feet. Some grass appears on the points. The small island about halfway between Black Cape and Alligator Island is about 0.3 mile in diameter, 48 feet high and covered with grass. Inside a line from Black Cape to Alligator Island the water is generally foul with numerous rocks and islets.

(688) Devil Inlet 3 miles northeast from Black Cape, has wooded shores. About 0.3 mile inside the entrance, rapids run heavily except for short periods of nearly slack water preceding and following high tide. The inlet level inside the rapids is about 11 to 12 feet above low water. Vessels drawing 3 feet or less may enter about 2½ hours before high tide. Numerous rocks exist in the channel and caution is required in making the passage. The preferred time to navigate this passage is during the slack before ebb which occurs about 2 hours after high water. Both slack water periods last for about 5 minutes. Within the inlet, shoal areas exist off the inshore points of the two islands about 1 mile south of the entrance. Passage must be made to the west of the northernmost island, thence southeast between the islands leading to the south portion of the inlet where depths in excess of 20 fathoms exist. The entrance outside the rapids is a good anchorage in heavy weather for small craft.

(689) Black Cape is low and grassy at the end and rises gradually in a narrow heavily wooded ridge to a prominent bald knob, 1,151 feet high. Bare and submerged rocks extend a short distance off the cape, and a reef, mostly showing above water, is on its south side. A fair anchorage protected from southeast weather can be found 1.2 miles northeast of the cape in 17 fathoms, rocky bottom.

(690) Foul Bay between Black Cape and Ban Island, is about 4 miles wide at its entrance. The bay extends east about 4 miles where it divides into a north arm extending east for about 2.5 miles and a south arm extending south for about 4 miles. The bay was surveyed in 1973, and depths in excess of 10 fathoms were found throughout most of the bay. Vessels wishing to enter Foul Bay are advised to parallel the Ban Island shore about 0.4 mile off, passing south of the island 1 mile east of the north point of Ban Island. The 231-foot NOAA Ship RAINIER used this passage to enter and anchor about 0.5 mile off the point dividing the bay into north and south arms. The bottom throughout the bay is broken with numerous rocky areas, and several attempts at anchoring may be necessary in any given area before finding soft bottom. Small craft may find shelter in the numerous coves within the bay. The southeast arm of Foul Bay leads to an extension of Paramanof Bay and may be navigated by small vessels steering midchannel courses.

(691) Ban Island separating Foul Bay from Paramanof Bay, is mountainous with steep slopes on all but the east end. The island is about 6 miles long in an east-west direction, and about 1.8 miles wide in a north-south direction. Kelp is close to its west end.

(692) Paramanof Bay between Ban Island and Cape Paramanof, was surveyed in 1973 and found to be deep and nearly clear of hazards. In the outer bay, it is recommended to favor the Ban Island side when entering. Care must be taken to avoid two rocks that are about 4.5 miles east of Cape Paramanof. The westernmost rock is bare and is 0.3 mile 025° from a rocky islet close to the south shore of the bay. A submerged rock, covered about 5 feet, is 0.5 mile 065° from the same rocky islet.

(693) An excellent anchorage is in the cove on the south side of the bay about 5 miles east of Cape Paramanof. Vessels should pass north of the rocks mentioned above, thence steer a south course to the center of the cove where good protection is afforded from all but strong northwest winds. Holding ground is good in 20 fathoms, soft bottom, with ample swinging room. Smaller vessels may anchor closer in. The long straight inlet leading south from this cove can be entered by small craft at one-half tide or higher.

(694) The east end of Paramanof Bay narrows to a pass with a small wooded island in the center. Passage south of this island provides the best water with a minimum of 4½ fathoms at midchannel. Current measurements just west of the island indicate the existence of weak tidal currents, less than 1 knot. The two bays extending southeast from Ban Island are clear of hazards and gradually shoal towards the streams at the head of each bay.

(695) The lower levels of Afognak Island in general are wooded with the exception of the east coast and the southwest end south of Paramanof Bay.

(696) Cape Paramanof is the northwest end of the peninsula included between Paramanof and Malina Bays. It is a low tongue of land projecting 0.5 mile north from the mountains. A reef is on the north side of the cape inside Paramanof Bay, and a part of it, about 0.5 mile from shore, is awash.

(697) The peninsula between Paramanof and Malina Bays is marked by two mountain ridges trending east, with a small stream in the valley between. The land is grass covered, with bare rocks in places, and has no timber. The north ridge rises in steep, grassy slopes to 1,830 feet with a saddle behind it and then extends east with about the same height. Tanaak Cape is the north point at the entrance of Malina Bay.

(698) Charts 16576, 16594, 16597

(699) Malina Bay indenting the west coast of Afognak Island, is between the mountainous peninsulas terminating in Tanaak and Steep Capes. It is about 10 miles long and is a secure harbor. Water can be obtained from numerous small streams. Some timber is found near the head of the bay and in some of the valleys. Steep Cape and the high cliff at the south point at the entrance and a prominent slide about 1 mile southeast of Tanaak Cape on the north side of the bay mark the entrance.

(700) The bay, 2.5 to 3 miles wide for nearly 4 miles, narrows to a neck about 1.5 miles long with a least width of 0.4 mile and then separates into two arms. The south arm, known as Malka Bay, extends from the south side of the neck 1.5 miles southeast. The east arm is about 800 yards wide near its entrance; it then opens out, forming a basin about 2 miles long and about 1.2 miles wide. A shallow arm, about 0.2 mile wide, extends 2 miles east from the east end of the basin.

(701) The outer part of the bay is clear, with the exception of a rock awash 0.2 mile from shore in the bight on the south side about 4 miles inside the entrance. Rocks awash extend 300 yards off the south side at the entrance to the neck and 0.5 mile west of the island in the entrance of Malka Bay. The depths are suitable for anchorage 0.3 to 0.4 mile from shore nearly anywhere in the bay. Holding is good in 12 to 18 fathoms, sloping bottom, along both shores about 1 mile inside the entrance. An anchorage with fair holding is available on the north side of its east end, about 0.3 mile west of a rocky islet, and the same distance from the shore northeast, in 15 fathoms. This anchorage is exposed to west weather, and northeast winds sometimes blow with considerable force.

(702) In the neck off the entrance of Malka Bay is an island 0.4 mile long and 115 feet high with a clump of trees near its middle. There is no safe passage between it and the shore southeast. An islet 30 feet high is on the south side of the neck 0.4 mile east of the island, and foul ground extends 225 yards from the south shore just east of the islet. A rock, 15 feet high, with a small one close west, is 400 yards northeast of the islet. The best channel is between the 30-foot islet and the 15-foot rock. A rock awash is 400 yards east of the 15-foot rock and over 300 yards from the north shore.

(703) To pass through the neck, pass 200 yards north of the island, steer 121° and pass 100 yards south of the 15-foot rock, in the middle of the neck.

(704) The basin has depths of 30 to 47 fathoms in its west half and shoals gradually east, affording secure anchorage. A rock covered at high water is 400 yards west from the north point at the entrance to the narrow arm extending east, and a shoal extends 600 yards southwest from a point on the north shore 0.4 mile north of the rock. The best anchorage is about 0.4 mile off the bight at the north end of the basin, with the entrance (neck) just closed, in 15 to 18 fathoms, sticky bottom.

(705) Malka Bay is a secure anchorage with a clear width of 0.2 mile. The northwest point of the island in the entrance should be given a berth of over 100 yards; a rock awash is 100 yards from the shore southwest of the same point.

(706) To enter Malka Bay, steer 163° pass 150 yards south of the northwest point of the island, and follow the southwest shore of the arm at a distance of about 250 yards. Anchor in the broad part about 0.6 mile from the head, in about 10 fathoms, sticky bottom. A flat extends nearly 0.4 mile from the head.

(707) High and low water in Malina Bay occur about 10 minutes earlier than at Seldovia.

(708) Raspberry Strait between Raspberry Island and Afognak Island, is about 16 miles long, uniformly narrow and about 1 mile wide from Shelikof Strait, at its northwest end, to Afognak Strait at its southeast end.

(709) The approach to the northwest entrance is clear of dangers; no known shoals or detached rocks are more than 100 yards offshore. The Shelikof Strait sides of Raspberry Island and Afognak Island are rugged with barren cliffs and bluffs except where valleys make into the interior of the islands.

(710) The southeast end of Raspberry Strait ends in two passes that lead into Afognak Strait around Little Raspberry Island. Both passes are dry at from 2 to 3 feet above low water, and numerous reefs border the shores of Raspberry Island in this vicinity and of Little Raspberry Island. However, the northeast pass is used at high water by local boats drawing less than 8 feet. Neither of these is recommended without local knowledge.

(711) Steep Cape also known as Twin Heads about 2.5 miles north of the northwest entrance to Raspberry Strait, is the most prominent headland between Malina Bay and the strait. Its bare, gray rocky sides rise abruptly from the water’s edge to its twin summits, 1,535 and 1,562 feet high. A light-colored rockslide is quite noticeable. A prominent 78-foot-high pinnacle rock is about 100 yards offshore; it is indistinguishable when seen against the cape.

(712) Between Steep Cape and the entrance to the strait is a bight with a gravel beach at the foot of a valley blocked by a bluff of glacial moraine about 250 feet high. The shore between the cape and this bight consists of a steep gravel bluff, 213 feet high, grass covered at the top, and giving the appearance of a tableland. The bluff is in the form of a point from which shoals extend for 0.5 mile offshore.

(713) The rounding point of the headland on the southwest side of the entrance to Raspberry Strait when seen from the southwest is somewhat similar to Steep Cape. However, its cliffs and rockslides are covered with grassy patches and do not have the general gray appearance that makes Steep Cape more prominent. The summit of this headland is 1,996 feet high and the slopes are steep. A pinnacle rock, 25 feet high off the southwest shore, makes a good landmark when not seen against the foot of the headland. Between this headland and Raspberry Cape are bights from which low valleys lead into the interior of Raspberry Island. The shores of these bights are gravel and the valleys are easily distinguished from offshore.

(714) Anchorages
(715) Since Raspberry Strait itself is not wide, small vessels may anchor along the shores throughout the strait where depths appear suitable, depending upon the protection required. The following anchorages are recommended for deep-draft vessels:

(716) On the northwest shore of Raspberry Island in Shelikof Strait are two bights, with gravel beaches, about 3 and 5 miles southwest of the entrance to Raspberry Strait. At the head of these bights deep valleys extend inland. Anchorage may be had in 10 to 15 fathoms, sand bottom, with good protection from east storms but exposed to the west. The northeast of these two bights is clear; the southwest bight is foul; coming in from the north vessels should keep at least 800 yards offshore.

(717) North of the entrance to Raspberry Strait and south of Steep Cape is a small bight with suitable protection from east storms and where anchorage may be had in 10 to 15 fathoms, sand and gravel bottom. The shore of this bight is a gravel beach just north of which are low grass-covered hills of glacial gravel.

(718) About 1.5 miles northwest of Dolphin Point, vessels may anchor off the northeast shore of the strait, in 12 to 15 fathoms, sand bottom, with good protection from east storms about 400 to 500 yards offshore.

(719) Fair anchorage for deep-draft vessels is 0.9 mile about 210° from Dolphin Point, in 12 to 15 fathoms, mud bottom.

(720) The best anchorage in the strait for large vessels with protection from east storms is 2 miles southeast of the mouth of Muskomee Bay and 600 yards off the northeast shore. A prominent white cabin, which bears between 250° and 270° is at the Port Vita Cannery ruins. Depths are 12 to 18 fathoms, sticky bottom.

(721) Another possible anchorage is located in deeper water, in midstrait off Selief Bay in about 18 fathoms, sand bottom.

(722) Anchorage for small vessels with good protection in any weather may be found in Selief Bay.

(723) Dangers
(724) There are no off-lying dangers or shoals at the northwest approach and entrance to Raspberry Strait. From the entrance of the strait to Selief Bay, the only dangers are inside 300 yards of the strait shore except for a shoal of 3½ fathoms about in midstrait, 0.75 mile 124° from Dolphin Point. This shoal is passed to the north as broken bottom is between the shoal and the gravel point on the south side of the strait.

(725) From Selief Bay to the southeast end of the strait are numerous shoals and dangers, and local knowledge is required even by small boats. Deep-draft vessels should not proceed beyond the entrance to Selief Bay. Between this bay and The Narrows are four rocky shoals well offshore; one of these has a least depth of 11 feet and is in midchannel about 0.4 mile north of Tiger Cape. From this cape southeast to The Narrows, sandspits make well out into the strait from many of the points.

(726) Routes
(727) The northwest entrance to Raspberry Strait may be approached from any direction by keeping 1 mile offshore. Come into the middle of the entrance off Raspberry Strait Light and steer a course 138° for about 4 miles until Dolphin Point is abeam about 700 yards. Thence steer 090° for about 1.5 miles until abeam the end of a low gravel point. Pass this gravel point about 0.4 mile and change course to 120°. Hold this course for about 1 mile and when the abandoned Iron Creek Cannery comes abeam, follow the middle of the strait on a course 151°.

(728) Approaching The Narrows at the southeast end of Raspberry Strait from Kupreanof Strait set a course 007° with the east end of Little Raspberry Island ahead. Approaching from the east, that is from Afognak Strait, set a course 270° with the south tangent of Little Raspberry Island ahead and pass 500 yards south of the foul ground south of Shoal Point. Give the east tip of Little Raspberry Island a berth of 400 yards as reefs make out 200 yards off the high-water line. Enter the pass favoring the north side and pass about 100 yards off Nochlega Point and the next point, which is adjacent. These two points form a double point with a short gravel beach between them. The Narrows uncovers several feet and is not recommended to vessels without local knowledge. This pass can be negotiated at high water springs by vessels up to 8-foot draft with extreme caution.

(729) Currents
(730) Tidal currents in Raspberry Strait are weak, except at The Slough and The Narrows where the range at the north end is greater than the range at the south end. It is estimated that from approximately midtide to high tide and vice versa, the current flows from Raspberry Strait into Afognak Strait. This current probably amounts to from 2 to 3 knots during spring tides. At approximately midtide the tidal level at the two ends of The Narrows is equalized, and as the tide falls below midtide the current reverses and flows from southeast to northwest until the pass goes dry at 2.5 feet above low water.

(731) Weather, Raspberry Strait and vicinity
(732) Southwest winds prevail from June to September. This prevailing wind is attended by good weather, mostly clear skies with little rain. These winds, however, often blow with such force as to build up heavy seas in Shelikof Strait, uncomfortable for all except full-powered vessels. The storms with east winds come with a frequency of one or two per month from June to October. During the summer, July is the worst month as the prevailing wind seems to be east attended by much rain although there are no severe east storms.

(733) Raspberry Strait Light (58°09'35"N., 153°13'25"W.), 50 feet above the water, is shown from a small house with a red and white diamond-shaped daymark on a small grass-covered island off Cape Nuniliak on the northeast side of the entrance. This island blends with the shore and it is difficult to pick up except when approaching from the north. Inside the strait, about 1 mile southeast from Raspberry Strait Light on the northeast side, is a prominent light-gray rocky bluff, which rises from the water’s edge 150 to 200 feet high.

(734) Both shores of Raspberry Strait, from the northwest entrance for about 7 miles, consist of rock ledges and numerous short gravel beaches between small rocky points. The shores rise steeply to the mountains except where valleys intervene. Close along the southwest shore about 1 mile inside the entrance are a number of off-lying pinnacle rocks, 5 to 41 feet high.

(735) Dolphin Point when approached from Shelikof Strait appears as a long grass- and tree-covered point with several low hills or nobs between it and the foot of the steep slope inland.

(736) Muskomee Bay receding 1.5 miles, is about 3 miles east of Dolphin Point on the east side of the strait. This bay is not suitable as an anchorage for large vessels, and it offers little protection for smaller vessels as east and west winds draw through the deep valleys at the head of the bay. Along its shores are outcropping ledges and a few gravel beaches. The bottom near the head is rocky. At the south side of the entrance, 200 yards off the shore, is a reef that uncovers 7½ feet. Off the north shore at the entrance to the bay are three rocky shoals with least depths of 6 to 20 feet. The head of the bay is foul except around the north side of an island in the head of the bay.

(737) From Muskomee Bay, the shores of the southeast part of the strait consist of boulder and gravel beaches and several low, grass-covered shale or gravel points. The terrain back of these shores is not as steep as in the northwest part of the strait and is timbered from Dolphin Point. The points extend from 200 to 300 yards and have shoals or outcropping ledges extending into the strait another 100 yards or more. One of these is on the northwest side of the strait about opposite Selief Bay.

(738) Selief Bay is on the southwest side of the strait about 6 miles southeast of Dolphin Point. The outer part of the small peninsula on the east side of the entrance to Selief Bay is a grass-covered glacial hill 93 feet high, serrated at the top and the most prominent landmark southeast of Dolphin Point. This bay offers good protection and anchorage for small vessels in any weather, particularly from southeast or east storms. The entrance to the bay is shoal with a bottom formation similar to a bar and with a least depth of 8 feet. Inside the bay the best anchorage is with the end of the point at the east side of the entrance bearing about north and in 1½ to 3 fathoms. The bottom is mud and the west side is shoal.

(739) Tiger Cape about 2 miles southeast of Selief Bay on the same side of the strait, is a low grass-covered shale point with several abandoned houses near the foot. More abandoned buildings of a former sawmill are about 0.25 mile farther to the southeast.

(740) The two islands opposite Tiger Cape and about 2 miles east of the entrance to Selief Bay are also prominent. The crests of these islands are wooded and the westernmost is 100 feet high, the other 160 feet.

(741) No other landmarks are between Tiger Cape and the south end of Raspberry Strait.

(742) On the opposite side of the strait north of Tiger Cape is Yukuk Bay a shallow bay, about 1 mile wide in a northwest and southeast direction, locally known as Cottonwood Bay. This bay shoals to 1 fathom about 300 yards inside the general trend of the northeast shore of the strait. Throughout the bay the depth varies from 2 to 8 feet. A long gravel and rocky spit making into the bay from the north point at the entrance uncovers. Favor the opposite side in entering.

(743) Another bay, locally known as Waskanareska Bay is east of Tiger Cape and on the southeast side of a gravel spit that separates it from Yukuk Bay. Depths vary from 3 to 6 feet. The inner part of the bay and the part along the northeast shore for 200 yards offshore uncovers. The east half of the entrance is foul and uncovers.

(744) Through The Narrows which is the pass on the northeast side of Little Raspberry Island and the approaches in Afognak Strait, the shores are mostly rock ledges with many off-lying dangers, some of which are dangerous to small craft.

(745) Rocks and shoals too numerous to mention are in the passes among Deranof Island, Little Raspberry Island and Raspberry Island. The pass on the west side of Little Raspberry Island is The Slough. These passes are used only by small vessels with local knowledge and at high tide only.

(746) The west side of Raspberry Island is mountainous and grass covered; the principal points are three high cliffs, between which are two deep valleys trending east. The south valley, about the middle of the island, is especially low and extends through to Onion Bay. The south side of Raspberry Island and Kupreanof Strait have been described earlier in this chapter.

(747) Viekoda Bay is on the east side of Shelikof Strait between Outlet Cape and Uganik Island. It extends east-southeast about 15 miles into Kodiak Island to a narrow head. Uganik East Passage enters Viekoda Bay on the south side about 7 miles inside the entrance. Good anchorage for moderate-sized vessels in 12 to 17 fathoms may be had 0.5 to 1 mile northwest from the islands 1.5 miles from the head of Viekoda Bay.

(748) Off the entrance, about 3 miles from Outlet Cape, is a bank on which the least depth found is 6¾ fathoms.

(749) A narrow point, its end detached, extends 0.4 mile from Uganik Island 1 mile east from its north end. Broken ground, with depths of 4 and 5 fathoms, extends 0.6 mile north from the point. A fair anchorage in south weather is in the bight on the east side of the point, 0.3 to 0.4 mile from shore, in 10 to 15 fathoms.

(750) A rock covered 4¾ fathoms, which should be avoided, is 0.6 mile from Uganik Island and 2.5 miles northwest of Naugolka Point.

(751) This point has an islet near it, and a rock that uncovers, is 0.8 mile east of the islet and 0.4 mile from the south shore of Viekoda Bay. Depths of 3 to 5 fathoms extend 0.3 mile north of the rock.

(752) Uganik Passage and Uganik East Passage border the south and east sides, respectively, of Uganik Island and connect Viekoda and Uganik Bays. Fishing gear extends outward along the shoreline of Uganik Passage between the spring and fall; mariners are advised to use caution.

(753) Uganik East Passage is clear of dangers in midchannel except for a flat that extends about 600 yards from the east shore, about 5 miles south-southeast of Naugolka Point, and a rock covered 5¼ fathoms, near the middle of the channel at the south end of the passage. An islet is close to Uganik Island in the bight about 0.2 mile southwest of the flat.

(754) Uganik Passage is 9 miles long from the southeast end of Uganik Island to East Point, where it joins Uganik Bay. The west end of the passage is broad and free from outlying dangers. ​Rocks that uncover extend 0.5 mile from the south shore of the passage, 1.8 miles east of East Point, and 0.5 mile farther east rocks extend 600 yards on the northwest side of a point on the south shore.

(755) A large bight on the south side of Uganik Island, 5 miles east of East Point, has shallow water extending 0.5 mile from the north shore for 1 mile from its head. From this bight a broad, low divide extends across the island. Anchorage in 12 fathoms, with good holding ground and protection from all except west weather, can be had off the entrance to the bight in 57°50.7'N., 153°21.8'W.

(756) The east end of the passage is much narrower than the west end. A 500-foot high peninsula extends south from Uganik Island, 2 miles from its southeast end, and narrows the passage to 0.2 mile. From the point on the south shore southeast of the peninsula, a ledge, which uncovers, makes out nearly half way across the narrowest part of the passage. Vessels transiting through this section should favor the southeast end of the peninsula. In the approach towards the peninsula from the east, a rock which uncovers is 0.3 mile from the south side of Uganik Island and 0.7 mile from its southeast end. A 5-fathom spot is reported 500 yards southeast of this rock.

(757) An island is in the middle of the passage west of the peninsula. Several rocks, submerged and bare at various stages of the tide, are in the vicinity and west of the island. Vessels from east may pass north of the island by following the southwest shore of the peninsula at a distance of 175 yards, taking care to avoid a rock awash on the west side. Once the island is abaft the port beam, steer 300° for the southernmost point of Uganik Island, which shows ahead with the summit of a peninsula a little on the port quarter. Foul ground and rocks awash extend 0.3 mile from Uganik Island 0.4 to 0.9 mile northwest of the peninsula.

(758) Vessels transiting the channel south of the island from east should bring the south end of the peninsula barely open from the point east, astern, and steer for the prominent point on the south shore 0.8 mile west of the island, course 281°. Keep close on this line, passing midway between the island and an islet near the south shore 0.3 mile southwest of the island. When the islet is passed, haul northwest and give the point a berth of over 100 yards. The principal dangers are a rock that uncovers, 200 yards southeast of the island, and a rock with 8 feet over it 0.3 mile west of the island. The islet should be given a berth of over 130 yards.

(759) ​Terror Bay extends several miles south from the turn of Uganik East Passage at the southeast end of Uganik Island. The main part of the bay is clear with the exception of a rock and charted shoals along the west shore. Secure anchorage for vessels of any size is 3 miles above the entrance and about 2.5 miles from the head of the bay, in 7 to 15 fathoms.

(760) Charts 16576, 16597

(761) Uganik Bay is on the east side of Shelikof Strait between Cape Uganik and Miners Point. In general the bay and its arms, with exception of East Arm, have depths too great for anchoring. Several small shoal spots rise abruptly from the general level of the bottom. One of these is in midchannel about 1 mile northwest from Mink Point at the junction of East and South Arms, and two others are in the passage between Sally Island and the shore at Starr Point. The shores of Uganik Bay rise abruptly from cliffs in places and are generally covered with grass and alder bushes.

(762) Pilotage, Uganik Bay
(763) Pilotage, except for certain exempted vessels, is compulsory for all vessels navigating the waters of the State of Alaska.

(764) The Kodiak Island area is served by the Southwest Alaska Pilots Association. (See Pilotage, General (indexed), Chapter 3, for the pilot pickup stations and other details.)

(765) Vessels en route to Uganik Bay can contact the pilot boat by calling “UGANIK BAY PILOT BOAT” on VHF-FM channel 16 or on a prearranged frequency between pilot and agent/vessel.

(766) Cape Uganik the northwest end of Uganik Island, is low and flat for about 0.3 mile back and then rises 1,200 to 1,500 feet. Foul ground extends 1.5 miles south from the cape and 0.3 mile or more offshore. Vessels should give the cape a berth of 1 mile.

(767) Noisy Islands a group of two, are 0.5 and 0.6 mile from Uganik Island and 2.5 miles SW from Cape Uganik. The north island is rolling with round-topped, grass-covered hills, the highest of which is about 192 feet. Noisy Islands Light (57°55'55"N., 153°33'48"W.), 80 feet above the water, is shown from a skeleton tower with a red and white diamond-shaped daymark on the west bluff of the north island. The south island is also grass-covered, but is low and flat. Two fine sand beaches are near the north end of this island and a house is nearby. When off Uganik Bay, these islands are sometimes hard to pick up as they merge into the brown hills of Uganik Island. Noisy Islands should be given a berth of 1 mile.

(768) Noisy Passage between Noisy Islands and Uganik Island, appears to be clear in midchannel with a least known depth of 7 fathoms. It is in constant use by small coasting vessels, but it is not recommended for deep-draft vessels. Vessels using this channel should avoid the rock awash, about 0.2 mile north of the north Noisy Islands. The area between the islands is shoal and rocky and should only be navigated by mariners possessing local knowledge.

(769) Miners Point 8 miles southwest from Cape Uganik, is distinctive in appearance as it terminates in three mound-like hills; the inner one is 390 feet high, and the outer one about 188 feet high.

(770) Broken Point about 3.5 miles east-southeast of Miners Point, is low and flat for 0.4 mile back and then rises to the highland back of it. The outer end of the point is detached and appears as if it had been broken off. A reef, which uncovers on a 2-foot minus tide, is about 250 yards off the point. The point should be given a berth of 0.8 mile.

(771) Anchorage in 12 to 18 fathoms, fair holding ground and protected from south wind, can be found about 1 mile west of Broken Point in 57°53.4'N., 153°39.0'W.

(772) A stream enters the bay in the bight 1.6 miles S from Broken Point. Good anchorage sheltered from south to west winds is off the mouth of the stream in 8 to 15 fathoms.

(773) West Point is a comparatively low rocky cliff that rises rapidly to the highland behind it.

(774) East Point 5 miles southeast from Broken Point, is the northwest extremity of the peninsula separating Uganik Bay and Uganik Passage. Two flat rocks with bluff sides are close to the point and from the point is a long gentle slope to the high land.

(775) Northeast Arm the first and largest arm in Uganik Bay, is about 3.3 miles south of East Point. Northeast Arm Light 1 (57°47'08"N., 153°27'14"W.), 58 feet (17.7 m) above the water, is shown from a small house with a square green daymark and marks the north entrance point to this arm.

(776) Rock Point the south entrance point, has several bare rocks that extend 250 yards north.

(777) Starr Point is the low rounding point on the northeast side of Northeast Arm where the channel is split by Sally Island. Starr Point Light 3 (57°45'21"N., 153°22'04"W.), 30 feet above the water, is shown from a skeleton tower with a square green daymark on a rock just off the point. The rock is awash at extreme high tide and attached to the shore at low tide.

(778) Sally Island just 2 miles long, occupies a central position in the basin at the head of Northeast Arm. The 1,000-foot-high island is covered by grass and alder bushes.

(779) Sheep Island is a small island just off the southeast point of Sally Island and is connected to it by a gravel spit which is covered at high water.

(780) A cannery is about 1.3 miles east-southeast of Starr Point. The wharf at the cannery has a face 110 feet long, with a least depth alongside of about 20 feet. In approaching this wharf care should be taken to avoid the spit that bares 150 yards off a small stream 0.3 mile west from the wharf. Deep water extends close up to the spit.

(781) The cannery at Port O’Brien 2.2 miles southeast of Starr Point, has a wharf 390 feet long with a 105-foot face and a depth of about 32 feet alongside. The oil wharf parallel to this main wharf is of equal length with a 30-foot face and has a depth of about 20 feet alongside. Both canneries store fuel oil, diesel oil and gasoline for their own use and have an abundant supply of water. They have some machine shop facilities and scow ways. Tides of 16.5 feet are necessary to use these ways. There are no marine railways. The cannery at Port O’Brien maintains radiotelephone and radiotelegraph communications.

(782) Deep water surrounds Sally and Sheep Islands except for the narrow passage between Sheep Island and the mainland, where it is nearly bare.

(783) A shoal with a least depth of 5¼ fathoms, sand and gravel bottom, is about 300 yards north from the north tip of Sally Island.

(784) Anchorage may be had off either cannery in about 30 fathoms.

(785) Village Islands are numerous islands and rocks 2 to 3.5 miles south from West Point. A cannery back of the islands maintains radiotelephone and radiotelegraph communications. An abandoned native village is in the cove just south of the islands. Anchorage for small craft may be had in 6 to 12 fathoms, but the approach is over broken ground making it safe for launches only. There are apparently no continuous channels between the various rocks and islands.

(786) East Arm extends southeast from Uganik Bay 7 miles south from East Point. It is 1 mile wide at the entrance and over 3 miles long, but a flat extends 1.5 miles from its head or 0.3 mile below the unnamed island on the bight on the south side of the arm. Depths range from 15 fathoms at the entrance to 3 fathoms near the flats. A rock 450 yards northwest from the island near the south shore uncovers 2 feet. Between this rock and the shore is another rock that uncovers. A row of four rocks, covered about 2 feet, is reported near the west shore about 0.4 mile southeast of Mink Point and to extend south about 0.2 mile to the beach. A saltery is on the south shore west of the unnamed island. It has a small wharf that bares at low water. In approaching the saltery, care should be taken to avoid the rocks mentioned above.

(787) East Arm affords an excellent anchorage for vessels of any size in 10 to 15 fathoms, sticky mud bottom. It is subject to heavy williwaws during south gales.

(788) South Arm extends 5.5 miles south from Mink Point the south entrance point to East Arm. The arm near its head is only 0.2 mile wide. A rock, covered ½ fathom, is 225 yards off the east shore, 0.6 mile south of Mink Point. Between the point and the submerged rock is a rock that uncovers 2 feet, 200 yards offshore. Anchorage may be had near the head in 16 fathoms, sticky mud bottom, where the arm is 0.7 mile wide.

(789) Routes
(790) Routes, Uganik Bay: From north, round Cape Uganik 1 mile and steer 222° for 3.5 miles to a position 1 mile off of Noisy Islands. Round the islands 1 mile and steer 158°for about 6 miles to a position midway between East and West Points.

(791) From south, give Cape Ugat and Miners Point a berth of 1.5 miles and Broken Point a berth of 0.8 mile. Then steer 143° for 4 miles to a point midway between East and West Points.

(792) To enter Northeast Arm: From a position midway between East and West Points steer 163° for 2.3 miles until the north tangent of the largest and most north of the Village Islands is on the starboard beam. Then change to 133° for 1.8 miles until Northeast Arm Light 1 is on the port beam, about 0.5 mile. Then change to 101° for 1.6 miles, thence change to 132° heading about 0.2 mile off Starr Point. Round Starr Point 0.2 mile or less and continue in midchannel along the east side of Sally Island to anchorage or wharf.

(793) To enter South Arm: From a position midway between East and West Points, steer 163° for 2.3 miles until the north tangent of the largest and most north of the Village Islands is on the starboard beam. Then change to 190° heading 0.4 mile off Mink Point, which separates East and South Arms. From midchannel off Mink Point, steer midchannel courses taking care to avoid the rocks that are as much as 225 yards offshore for 0.8 mile south from Mink Point.

(794) To enter East Arm: Follow courses as above until off East Arm and then enter on a midchannel course taking up anchorage as desired.

(795) Cape Ugat on the east shore of Shelikof Strait 12 miles southwest from Cape Uganik, is a high ridge sloping to a low rocky cliff at the point of the cape. A short distance off the cape is a small, rocky, grass-covered islet 104 feet high that can be seen for 15 miles up and down the coast on a clear day. A reef that uncovers about 5 feet is about 175 yards west of the islet. Between the islet and the cape is a channel used by the local cannery tenders. Little River is a meandering stream that enters the strait a short distance south of Cape Ugat.

(796) Cape Kuliuk about 5 miles southwest from Cape Ugat, is a cliff at the end of a ridge about 2,000 feet high. A peculiar and prominent clump of rocks is on the summit back of the cape.

(797) Uyak Bay is on the east side of Shelikof Strait, south of the mountainous peninsula terminating in Capes Ugat and Kuliuk.

(798) The approach between Cape Kuliuk and Rocky Point (see also chart 16598) is about 11 miles wide, east of which the bay converges rapidly to Harvester Island. It extends 25 miles southeast from Harvester Island. The shores of the bay rise in steep slopes of 2,000 to 4,000 feet and have many mountain streams. The only timber is some alders in the gulches and some cottonwoods at the heads of the bays. Uyak Bay is an important salmon fishery. The best anchorage in Uyak Bay is found south of Harvester Island and in Zachar Bay.

(799) Chief Point on the north shore of Uyak Bay opposite Harvester Island, is formed by a grass-covered island about 90 feet high and has several ridges and small hills. Several rocks awash are about 0.3 mile west from the northwest point of this island. The highest of a group of rocks, known as Bird Rock is 0.5 mile southeast from Chief Point and is 110 feet high.

(800) Chief Cove is the narrow strait behind the island forming Chief Point. A rock that uncovers 6 feet is in the north entrance. The south entrance is very shoal. Depths of 8 to 12 feet are in the north part of the cove. It is used as an anchorage by cannery tenders during the fishing season.

(801) Spiridon Bay opens into Uyak Bay northeast of Harvester Island. It extends 12 miles inland in an east-southeast direction. Broken ground, with a least depth of 4½ fathoms, extends about 0.6 mile northwest from the point on the south side of the entrance. The only good anchorages for large vessels in Spiridon Bay are at the head in 13 to 16 fathoms, sand and mud bottom. Care should be taken to avoid the 2¾-fathom shoal 0.3 mile off the east shore and 1.2 miles southeast from Telrod Cove. A temporary anchorage can be had in 16 to 18 fathoms about 0.5 mile north from Clover Rock. The bottom is volcanic ash, which has the appearance of yellow sand and has fair holding qualities.

(802) In entering Spiridon Bay from the north, Chief Point should be given a berth of 1 mile. In approaching from the south, the point separating Spiridon and Zachar Bays should not be approached closer than 1 mile to avoid the rock that is nearly 0.5 mile off the point. From a position 1.5 miles south from Chief Point steer 097° for about 8 miles until Ditto Islets are abeam to starboard, about 0.3 mile. Then change to 135° and anchor as desired.

(803) Clover Rock 34 feet high, is a rocky islet 0.2 mile off the south shore and 1.5 miles from the south entrance point to Spiridon Bay. It is connected to the mainland by a gravel shoal that bares at minus tides. A large stream enters the bay just east of Clover Rock.

(804) Thistle Rock is a small islet consisting of black jagged rocks, about 10 feet high, 0.8 mile northeast of Clover Rock. It is always bare and affords a good mark in clear weather. There are three dangerous rocks in the vicinity of the Thistle Rock. One rock, about 250 yards northwest of Thistle Rock, uncovers 1 foot. The other two are submerged 0.9 and 2.3 fathoms and are about 180 yards east and 440 yards south-southwest of Thistle Rock, respectively.

(805) Ditto Islets a pair 30 and 35 feet high, are in the middle of Spiridon Bay about 7 miles inside the entrance. The bottom between the pair and the south shore is broken and has several rocks awash and a rock 25 feet high. A group of islands in a foul area adjacent to the south shore is southwest of the Ditto Islets; of these, Anguk Island is the largest. There are several dangerous rocks, shoals and ledges amongst these islets and between Auguk Island and the south shore. These islands should be given a berth of at least 0.25 mile.

(806) Telrod Cove is a small cove on the north side of the bay about 10 miles from Chief Point. It affords good shelter in west weather for small craft. The cove shoals rapidly with mudflats at its head. Anchorage may be had in 7 to 15 fathoms, sand and shell bottom. A large stream enters the bay here.

(807) Weasel Cove which forms the west arm at the head of Spiridon Bay, is 0.3 mile wide and has depths of 5 to 7 fathoms in the middle, sand and mud bottom. The cove is an excellent anchorage for small craft. To enter Weasel Cove keep from 250 to 300 yards off the west shore and enter the cove in midchannel, taking up anchorage as desired.

(808) Chart 16599

(809) Harvester Island about 9 miles south of Cape Kulink and 0.3 mile off the southwest entrance point to Uyak Bay, is over 1 mile long, 844 feet high, steep sided and grass covered. The 20-fathom curve is about 0.3 mile off the north and east sides of the island, and foul ground extends off the north and east sides for 350 yards in places. A spit, which uncovers and is steep-to, extends 425 yards southwest from the south end of the island. Harvester Island Spit Light 2 (57°38'15"N., 153°59'41"W.), 22 feet above the water, is shown from a red triangular daymark on a multi-pile structure on the end of the spit.

(810) Bear Island 249 feet high and grass covered, is about 0.8 mile west of Harvester Island. It is 0.3 mile from the shore, with which it is connected by a boulder spit that uncovers about 7 feet.

(811) Uyak Anchorage between Harvester Island and the coast to the southwest, is one of the best harbors on the east side of Shelikof Strait south of Uganik Bay. It has two entrances of which the south is preferred. The depths range from about 5 fathoms between Harvester Island and Bear Island to 20 fathoms 0.4 mile north-northwest of Harvester Island Spit Light 2. The best anchorage is about 0.6 mile north-northwest of the light, in 12 to 14 fathoms. Good anchorage, except with heavy northeast or east winds, can be had about 500 yards south of the light 0.3 mile offshore, in 12 to 14 fathoms.

(812) The northwest entrance is 0.3 mile wide between two reefs, partly bare at half tide and marked by kelp, one extending 400 yards west from the northwest end of Harvester Island and the other 250 to 550 yards east from Bear Island. With care this entrance is not difficult in the daytime, especially at low water when the principal dangers show above water. Once entrance is made and the reefs are passed, favor the east side of the channel to avoid a 2-fathom shoal that is about 0.3 mile south-southwest of the northwest tip of Harvester Island.

(813) The better and safer entrance to the anchorage is around the south end of Harvester Island. Cormorant Rock which uncovers about 7 feet, is about 0.6 mile south-southeast of Harvester Island and 400 yards offshore.

(814) The native village of Uyak and the cannery on the southwest side of Uyak Anchorage have been abandoned and are in ruins. There are a few homestead cabins along the shore south of these ruins.

(815) Routes
(816) Routes, Uyak Anchorage: From northward, round Cape Ugat about 1.5 miles and steer 220° for 6 miles to a position 2.5 miles off Cape Kuliuk, bearing 102°. Then steer 172° for 10 miles, giving the east shore a berth of about 2 miles, to a position 0.5 mile east of Harvester Island. (See chart 16597.)

(817) Then steer 237° passing about 0.3 mile southeast of Harvester Island. Anchor 500 yards northeast or north of the slipways, in 10 to 14 fathoms.

(818) To go to the inner harbor, follow the preceding directions and then haul northwest, round the light at 100 yards, steer 335° for the northwest end of Harvester Island, pass 150 to 200 yards off the ruins of the cannery wharf at Uyak and continue the course to midchannel.

(819) From southward: Give Cape Uyak, Rocky Point and Bear Island berths of 1 mile or over, and follow the east shore of Harvester Island at a distance of 0.5 mile or more. Then follow directions as given above.

(820) In passing Rocky Point care should be taken to avoid Wolcott Reef, which is 0.3 mile off the point and bares only at extreme low water.

(821) Chart 16597

(822) Zachar Bay about 7 miles southeast of Harvester Island, is 0.8 mile wide at the entrance and extends southeast for 5.5 miles where the bay terminates in an extensive mudflat that uncovers. This mudflat affords an excellent place for beaching a vessel in an emergency.

(823) Carlsen Point the south entrance point to Zachar Bay, is low and appears as a bluff when off the entrance. Care should be taken with several rocks that lie about 200 yards off the north shore of the entrance.

(824) A dangerous rock, covered 2¾ fathoms, is 1.6 miles north from Carlsen Point and 0.6 mile offshore.

(825) Carlsen Reef which uncovers 10 feet, is a danger about 0.3 mile northwest from the northeast tip of Carlsen Point.

(826) A reduction plant is on the north shore of Zachar Bay 3 miles above the entrance. The plant has a wharf with a 100-foot face and a least depth alongside of 18 feet. Large vessels dock port-side-to. Radiotelephone and radiotelegraph communications are maintained. There is also float plane service available from Kodiak.

(827) A large stream, with many cottonwood trees along its sides, enters the head of the bay. Kodiak bears are numerous in the area.

(828) Excellent anchorage sheltered from all winds may be had in 12 to 15 fathoms, mud bottom, off the mudflats at the head of Zachar Bay. The anchorage is subjected to moderate williwaws. In anchoring, care should be taken to avoid the mudflats that extend 1.5 miles from the head of the bay.

(829) In entering Zachar Bay, the shore on the port hand should not be approached closer than 1 mile, and a course should be laid to pass 300 yards off the 2¾-fathom rock. From this point steer 127° until Carlsen Point is abeam on the starboard hand, then change to 145° and continue, keeping in midchannel.

(830) Amook Island formed by a mountainous ridge, divides an 8-mile stretch of Uyak Bay into two passages. The east passage is narrow and obstructed in places, and as a through route should be used only by small vessels with local knowledge. Reefs extend 0.3 mile north from the north end of Amook Island.

(831) The ship passage is west of Amook Island. Aleutian Rock marked by a daybeacon on its southwest side, is 0.3 mile off the southwest shore of Amook Island, in the south end of this passage. This dangerous rock uncovers 1 foot and is not marked by kelp. Vessels should pass between Aleutian Rock and Alf Island. The steamship ALEUTIAN was lost here in 1929.

(832) A cannery is on the west shore of Uyak Bay opposite the south end of Amook Island.

(833) In the bight on the west side of Amook Island, 2.5 miles from its north end, is an anchorage for a small vessel in about 10 fathoms, with shelter from east and south winds. The bottom is uneven with a possibility of dangers. The entrance is between the south point of the bight and a bare rock 0.6 mile north from the point and 0.5 mile from Amook Island. Between this rock and the island is a reef, partly bare at low water, which extends 0.5 mile southeast from an islet.

(834) The passage east of Amook Island for about 2.5 miles from its north end has suitable depths and sufficient width for anchoring vessels of moderate size. The passage then narrows to 300 yards, and from the point on the east side a kelp-marked reef extends west and northwest more than halfway across, leaving a narrow channel between the reef and the west shore. Near the northwest end of the reef is a bare rock. An anchorage for small vessels may be found on the west side of the south end of the narrows, around the point, in 5 to 8 fathoms. A small vessel can also anchor 300 yards off the narrow entrance of the shallow lagoon 0.4 mile northeast of the point of the narrows, in 5 to 6 fathoms. A 2¼-fathom spot is about 500 yards off the lagoon entrance.

(835) Thence for 2 miles the passage is clear to the second narrows where a spit, partly bare at low water, extends halfway across from a low grassy point on the west side and leaves a channel 125 yards wide between the south end of the spit and an island. The channel is west of this island and the next island 0.4 mile south; the west shore should be favored until over 0.2 mile south of the south island. South of this point the passage is clear. Some prospecting has been done on the east side of the passage 2 miles from its south end.

(836) Lying 0.8 to 2.5 miles south of Amook Island is a chain of islands with foul ground between them and about 300 yards off the northwest end of Alf Island.

(837) The safer and recommended passage is east of the chain composing Alf Island. Broken bottom extends about 300 yards into the passage from the central islets of the chain, and directly opposite, a reef extends 200 yards from the east side of the passage. The reef is marked at its outer end by a bare rock visible at all times.

(838) At the south end of the chain of islands is a small inlet in the west shore about 0.8 mile long and 300 yards wide, affording anchorage in about 12 fathoms.

(839) From 3 to 6 miles south of Alf Island, Uyak Bay shoals gradually from 20 to 4 fathoms and anchorage may be selected in any depth desired. The swinging room is about 1,400 yards in diameter.

(840) The upper end of Uyak Bay is bordered by high snow-covered mountains.

(841) Chart 16599

(842) Larsen Bay is on the west side of Uyak Bay, 6 miles south of Harvester Island. Depths inside the bay are 7 to 38 fathoms; the north shore slopes steeply to the flat bottom, while the south shore slopes more gradually. From its head, a trail leads over a low divide to the Karluk River. A large pier and a large cannery are on the west side of the spit that separates Larsen Bay from Uyak Bay. The pier, built over the shoal water, is 1,190 feet long and has a depth of 12 feet at its outer end. A 3-ton crane is on the pier. Water is available through a pipeline during summer months only. Gasoline, kerosene and diesel oil are stored for cannery use and may be purchased. A machine shop is maintained for cannery use, and a store is available for the purchase of food and clothing in small quantities. A small dispensary and first aid station are available but no doctor is in residence. There is a row of public pay telephones south of the cannery office.

(843) The entrance is between a spit extending 150 yards south of the north shore and a 20-foot islet about 150 yards from the south shore. There is a reef, marked by a light, in the middle of the entrance that uncovers at low water. Two narrow crooked channels lead on either side of the reef. The preferred south channel, between the mid-entrance reef and the 20-foot islet, 200 yards southeast of it, is marked by a 248° range. The front range is a pile on the flats bearing a circular orange disk, and the rear range is another circular orange disk painted under the gable of a building. This channel has a least depth of 3.7 fathoms on the range. A 291.3°inner lighted range marks the final approach to the bay.

(844) Anchorage
(845) A good anchorage for larger vessels will be found about 600 yards north of the small island on the south side of the bay and about 800 yards west of the cannery pier. This anchorage is in about 20 fathoms of water with mud bottom. In west weather, the winds blow down the bay with great force. The holding ground is good. On the south side of the small island there is a harbor for small vessels. A reef, marked by a buoy, extends about 50 yards west off the west end of the island. The harbor is bordered by three breakwaters. The south breakwater, which extends from Kodiak Island, is marked by a light. Depths in the harbor range from 1.5 to 2.7 fathoms.

(846) Routes
(847) Small vessels can enter Larsen Bay at any stage of the tide, but large vessels should choose a high-water slack with calm weather for entering or leaving.

(848) Enter on the range and pass midway between the reef marked by a light on the north side and the 20-foot rock, 200 yards south from it. Hold this range, 248° until within about 300 yards of the dolphin with the orange disk and then pick up the 291.3° inner range, passing between Daybeacons 2 and 3. Maintain course 291.3° until 400 yards from Larsen Bay Range Front Light and turn left to 245° for 0.5 mile, then haul south and anchor as desired.

(849) Currents
(850) A strong tidal current sweeps through the entrance with an estimated velocity of 4 to 5 knots. Steep waves will build at the entrance when strong easterly winds blow opposing the ebb current.

(851) Pilotage, Larsen Bay
(852) Pilotage, except for certain exempted vessels, is compulsory for all vessels navigating the waters of the State of Alaska.

(853) The Kodiak Island area is served by the Southwest Alaska Pilots Association. (See Pilotage, General (indexed), Chapter 3, for the pilot pickup stations and other details.)

(854) Vessels en route to Larsen Bay can contact the pilot boat by calling “LARSEN BAY PILOT BOAT” on VHF-FM channel 16 or on a prearranged frequency between pilot and agent/vessel.

(855) Chart 16598

(856) Sevenmile Beach is the long boulder-strewn beach from Bear Island to Rocky Point. It is backed by low cliffs from which a broad grassy valley extends back several miles toward Karluk Lake.

(857) Rocky Point is a double point on the south side of the approach to Uyak Bay. It consists of bold cliffs which rise rapidly to the ridges, of that the point is a termination.

(858) Wolcott Reef a dangerous group of rocks that bare at extreme low water, is 0.3 mile off the east spur of Rocky Point. A channel is between the reef and the point and has a least known depth of 4 fathoms. This channel is used by beach seiners in good weather. A buoy is 0.2 mile west of the reef.

(859) Cape Uyak on the east side of Shelikof Strait about 4 miles southwest from Rocky Point, is a precipitous high headland at the end of a ridge. From the water the slope rises abruptly to 647 feet. There is then a slight fall to a deep notch in the narrow neck back of the cape, from which there is a rise in steep, grassy slopes to higher land.

(860) Northeast Harbor is the bight on the south side of Cape Uyak. In northeast weather it affords excellent shelter for small craft that can anchor close under the shore in 3 to 5 fathoms, sandy bottom. Larger vessels anchor farther out in 9 fathoms with some protection but subject to an uncomfortable swell.

(861) Between Cape Uyak and Karluk are two long cliffs about 1,300 feet high, the south one having a marked slide extending from its highest point almost to the water. In the valley between the cliffs are two waterfalls. Beach seining is carried on here during the season, and a number of shacks used by fishermen are on the beach at the foot of the cliffs.

(862) Chart 16599

(863) Karluk 5.5 miles south from Cape Uyak and 1.5 miles east from Cape Karluk, is a native village with a school and a church. Fishing is the principal industry. Two of the old cannery buildings are still standing next to the river entrance, but they are no longer used, as the fish are now taken to Uyak Bay for canning. A strong set south toward the shoals inshore has been experienced.

(864) Radiotelephone and radiotelegraph communications are maintained.

(865) The entrance to Karluk River is through a narrow channel at the south end of a spit and is only passable by launches at high water. About 1.5 miles up the river is a weir where the salmon are counted as they ascend the river. The weir is removed during the winter.

(866) Karluk Anchorage off Karluk, is sheltered from offshore winds but is exposed to winds from the southwest around through west to northeast. Vessels should be prepared to move on short notice. Anchorage may be had off the town in 12 to 14 fathoms, sandy bottom. During the fishing season a number of scows and launches are usually found moored in the roadstead.

(867) The abandoned cannery buildings and the church spire are the principal objects to be seen in approaching Karluk.

(868) Tanglefoot Bay is the bight adjacent to Cape Karluk on its east side. It is separated from Karluk by a high cliff, the base of which is not passable by pedestrians at high water. Tanglefoot Beach is very steep and has a bad undertow. Landing here is dangerous if there is any surf.

(869) Chart 16598

(870) Cape Karluk is the most conspicuous landmark along the west coast of Kodiak Island. The cape is a prominent, projecting head, 1,420 feet high, with bare rock cliffs on its seaward face and grassy slopes on its east side to lowland. It is readily identified by its cone-shaped appearance, a notch in the summit and the lowland behind it.

(871) Sturgeon River has its mouth about 2 miles south from Cape Karluk. The entrance is between 2 shingle spits covered with driftwood. It can be entered by small boats at half tide or better. For about 1 mile back of the beach the river flows through a mudflat, which is covered at high water.

(872) Sturgeon Head is a high whitish eroded headland 5 miles southwest from Cape Karluk. Several rocks and reefs are as much as 200 yards offshore at the foot of Sturgeon Head.

(873) Cape Grant about 10 miles south-southwest of Cape Karluk, is a rugged headland at the end of a high ridge, the summit of which is marked by a small cluster of peculiar pinnacle rocks.

(874) A rock nearly awash at low water is 0.3 mile off the southwest tip of Cape Grant. Shoal water extends some distance beyond this rock and vessels rounding the cape into Halibut Bay should give it a berth of 0.8 mile.

(875) Halibut Bay is the large bight just southwest from Cape Grant. The bight is bordered by eroded bluffs and a broad sand beach. A stream enters the sea at the south part of Halibut Bay. Vessels anchor in 7 fathoms, hard sand bottom, 0.8 mile off the beach. Small craft may find more protection closer in near the mouth of the lagoon.

(876) Anchorage
(877) Anchorage is also available in the north corner of the bay, but care should be taken to avoid the reef that makes out from the southwest tip of Cape Grant.

(878) An abandoned cannery is at the south end of Halibut Bay at the entrance to the lagoon; the cannery wharf dries at low water.

(879) Middle Cape the westernmost promontory on Kodiak Island, consists of two headlands having precipitous, rocky cliffs facing the sea and smooth grassy slopes facing inland. The north headland is the higher, a little over 1,000 feet. Its summit consists of three rocky clumps, the middle one of which is the highest. These rocky clumps are prominent and easily distinguished from the north.

(880) A prominent high pinnacle rock is at the foot of the north slope of Middle Cape.

(881) Tombstone Rocks consist of two detached rocks about 100 yards apart 0.8 mile off Middle Cape. The south rock is 99 feet high while the north rock is only a few feet high. From some directions these rocks appear as the headstone and footstone of a grave. Deep water is close to the rocks.

(882) Mushroom Reef which uncovers 13 feet, is about 0.3 mile offshore and 1 mile southeast from Middle Cape. This rock when exposed by the tide is round and has the appearance of a huge mushroom. Deep water is close up to it.

(883) A prominent pillarlike shaft of rock, 170 feet high, with overhanging sides, is about 100 yards offshore and east from Mushroom Reef.

(884) Middle Bay is a small bight about midway between Middle Cape and Cape Ikolik. The 5-fathom curve is about 0.3 mile off the beach.

(885) Gurney Bay is the bay immediately northeast from Cape Ikolik. The head of the bay is shoal with a sand beach strewn with boulders. Anchorage may be had in 10 fathoms, sandy bottom, midway between the two entrance points. This is a comfortable and secure anchorage in east weather.

(886) Chart 16601

(887) Cape Ikolik 4 miles south of Middle Cape, is a rugged headland 1,008 feet high, with its summit forming a ridge lying in a northeast and southwest direction.

(888) Outer Seal Rock 1.8 miles west from Cape Ikolik, resembles a sail and is 89 feet high. The rock has deep water close-to except about 200 yards to the southwest where there are submerged rocks. Outer Seal Rock is a sea lion rookery.

(889) Inner Seal Rock 0.3 mile west from Cape Ikolik, is a steep-sided bare rock 125 feet high, surmounted by a rocky nub that gives it the appearance of a lighthouse. From some directions it appears as a huge bell.

(890) Bumble Bay is 2.5 miles east of Cape Ikolik. The west point of the bay is marked by three pinnacle rocks, while the east point is marked by a single pinnacle rock 127 feet high. Small craft will find shelter from east winds in the east part of the bay, while large vessels will find anchorage in the center of the bay in 12 fathoms, sand bottom.

(891) Ayakulik Island 5 miles southeast of Bumble Bay, is small and 220 feet high. A reef extends east from the east point of the island to a sandspit on the mainland of Kodiak Island. About 300 yards west and north of the island are bare rocks and rocks awash.

(892) Small launches will find shelter in southeast or east weather in 5 fathoms, 300 yards northeast of the island. Larger vessels will find shelter from east weather in 7 fathoms, 0.5 mile north of the island.

(893) Ayakulik River known locally as Red River discharges at a point 1.8 miles southeast of Ayakulik Island. With local knowledge, the river can be entered at high tide in smooth weather by small launches. The Fish and Wildlife Service maintains a station here during the salmon season.

(894) From a point 3 miles north of Ayakulik Island to Low Cape, the shoreline runs in a nearly north-south direction and is marked by earth bluffs varying from a few feet to 267 feet high.

(895) Ikpik Hill a prominent high dark-colored earth bluff, is 3.2 miles north of Low Cape, and in approaching from Cape Ikolik, this bluff may be mistaken by a stranger for Low Cape.

(896) Low Cape 11.5 miles northwest from Cape Alitak, is the west extremity of the lowland in this vicinity. The extremity of the cape is marked by a peak-shaped light-colored earth bluff about 90 feet high. A spit, bare at low water, extends nearly 0.3 mile off the cape. The water deepens gradually, the 10-fathom curve lying 2.3 miles off the cape.

(897) From a position 2 miles west of Low Cape, heavy kelp extends east-southeast. Soundings in this kelp showed depths of from 3 to 7 fathoms, but much shoaler water probably exists. Low Cape should be given a berth of about 3 miles.

(898) Sukhoi Bay has its entrance about 6 miles south of Low Cape. The entrance is narrow and is between two sandbars. It has a depth of about 6 feet but should not be attempted except with local knowledge.

(899) The coast from Low Cape to Cape Alitak apparently has no off-lying dangers.

(900) Cape Alitak has been described earlier in this chapter.

(901) Routes
(902) Routes, Cape Karluk to Cape Alitak: From a point 2 miles off Cape Karluk (see chart 16598), steer 222° for 5.5 miles to a position with Sturgeon Head (a high white eroded cliff) abeam. Then change to 213° for 11.5 miles until Tombstone Rock is on the port beam, 2 miles.

(903) Then change to 196° for 4 miles or until Outer Seal Rock (a sail-shaped pinnacle) is a little abaft the beam, 2 miles.

(904) Then change to 154° for 23.3 miles to pass 2.8 miles off Low Cape. On this course Low Cape should be passed in a depth of 14 fathoms.

(905) When Low Cape bears 083° 3 miles, haul to 132° for 12.5 miles, passing about 1.3 miles off Cape Alitak, to a position with the cape bearing 010° 1.5 miles.

(906) If bound to Alitak Bay, follow routes given in the description of that place.